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What is considered orthodox?

P: n/a
I am abvioulsy new to this and I need to ask a basic question.

What is the orthodox way or the normal or expected way that a web app is
written? Do you usually write it using localhost and the copy the
application to the web, or is it considered normal practice to write
directly to the web ( to your domain name) and the copy that to local host
for backup?

Nov 18 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
In most cases, it's certainly better to author the site on localhost and to
put changes on the live site when they are tested and ready...

"Woody Splawn" <no****@splawns.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I am abvioulsy new to this and I need to ask a basic question.

What is the orthodox way or the normal or expected way that a web app is
written? Do you usually write it using localhost and the copy the
application to the web, or is it considered normal practice to write
directly to the web ( to your domain name) and the copy that to local host
for backup?

Nov 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
It is logical to use a Development server for development and debugging.
Doing development and debugging on a live server is potentially
catastrophic, and at best, extremely difficult.

--
HTH,
Kevin Spencer
..Net Developer
Microsoft MVP
Big things are made up
of lots of little things.

"Woody Splawn" <no****@splawns.com> wrote in message
news:ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I am abvioulsy new to this and I need to ask a basic question.

What is the orthodox way or the normal or expected way that a web app is
written? Do you usually write it using localhost and the copy the
application to the web, or is it considered normal practice to write
directly to the web ( to your domain name) and the copy that to local host
for backup?

Nov 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Develop locally. If you have direct access to the production server, you can
use Project/Copy Project to copy just the files you need at runtime. If you
don't have this access, create a second local project and copy as above to
that, then deploy from there.

"Woody Splawn" <no****@splawns.com> wrote in message
news:ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I am abvioulsy new to this and I need to ask a basic question.

What is the orthodox way or the normal or expected way that a web app is
written? Do you usually write it using localhost and the copy the
application to the web, or is it considered normal practice to write
directly to the web ( to your domain name) and the copy that to local host
for backup?

Nov 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
For situations where you have "1 application, 1 developer" People almost
always develop on their local machine. Now, as far as how that gets to the
server, it depends on the person and their companies practices. Where I
work, we HAVE to create installation packages for everything, although we
really wish we could just do a straight file copy.
In a group environment, it can change a little. MSoft wrot an article you
might want to scan the looks at some pros and cons -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true

"Woody Splawn" <no****@splawns.com> wrote in message
news:ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
I am abvioulsy new to this and I need to ask a basic question.

What is the orthodox way or the normal or expected way that a web app is
written? Do you usually write it using localhost and the copy the
application to the web, or is it considered normal practice to write
directly to the web ( to your domain name) and the copy that to local host
for backup?

Nov 18 '05 #5

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