By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
424,949 Members | 950 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 424,949 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

HttpStatusCode Enumerations...

P: n/a
The StatusCode is returned as an HttpWebResponse Member Name
such as OK, Moved, NotFound and so on.

Does anybody know how to get an actual HTTP return code?

--
<%= Clinton Gallagher
A/E/C Consulting, Web Design, e-Commerce Software Development
Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin USA
NET cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com
URL http://www.metromilwaukee.com/clintongallagher/
Nov 18 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


P: n/a
"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote in
news:Or**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl:
The StatusCode is returned as an HttpWebResponse Member Name
such as OK, Moved, NotFound and so on.

Does anybody know how to get an actual HTTP return code?


From the help entry for HttpStatusCode:

"The HttpStatusCode enumeration contains the values of the status
codes defined in RFC 2616 for HTTP 1.1."

HttpStatusCode is an enumeration, so it's already a number. An
enumeration's default numeric type is Int32 (int in C#). Try:

using System;
using System.Net;

namespace ExampleNamespace
{
public class ExampleClass
{
[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
HttpWebRequest httpReq =
(HttpWebRequest) WebRequest.Create("http://www.yahoo.com");
httpReq.AllowAutoRedirect = false;

HttpWebResponse httpRes =
(HttpWebResponse) httpReq.GetResponse();

Console.WriteLine("httpRes.StatusCode name = {0}",
httpRes.StatusCode) ;
Console.WriteLine("httpRes.StatusCode value = {0}",
(int) httpRes.StatusCode) ;

// Close the response.
httpRes.Close();
}
}
}
Hope this helps.

Chris.
-------------
C.R. Timmons Consulting, Inc.
http://www.crtimmonsinc.com/
Nov 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks for the copy and pasted code Chris. ;-) I used a similar snippet
and read the same statement regarding the enumeration...

Using the remote MSDN copy of what we have locally...
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...classtopic.asp
To make the long story short I was not casting the StatusCode
property to an int. How would I know? Am I to understand that
all enums return an integer type?

Here's my (curious) code that now returns desired results...

HttpWebRequest httpReq =
(HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://metromilwaukee.com");
httpReq.AllowAutoRedirect = false;

HttpWebResponse httpRes = (HttpWebResponse)httpReq.GetResponse();

lblResponseValue.Text = "<b>Member Name: </b>"
+ httpRes.StatusCode + "<br
/>"
+ "<b>Status Code: </b>"
+ (int) httpRes.StatusCode
+"<br />"
+ "<b>Last Modified: </b>"
+ httpRes.LastModified;

// Note the curiosity regarding no requirement to use the ToString( )
method
nor cast the same property to an int unless I would have somehow known
to
do so. These circumstantial uses of type are keeping me confused.

<%= Clinton Gallagher


"Chris R. Timmons" <crtimmons@X_NOSPAM_Xcrtimmonsinc.com> wrote in
message news:Xn**********************************@207.46.2 48.16...
"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote in
news:Or**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl:
The StatusCode is returned as an HttpWebResponse Member Name
such as OK, Moved, NotFound and so on.

Does anybody know how to get an actual HTTP return code?


From the help entry for HttpStatusCode:

"The HttpStatusCode enumeration contains the values of the status
codes defined in RFC 2616 for HTTP 1.1."

HttpStatusCode is an enumeration, so it's already a number. An
enumeration's default numeric type is Int32 (int in C#). Try:

using System;
using System.Net;

namespace ExampleNamespace
{
public class ExampleClass
{
[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
HttpWebRequest httpReq =
(HttpWebRequest) WebRequest.Create("http://www.yahoo.com");
httpReq.AllowAutoRedirect = false;

HttpWebResponse httpRes =
(HttpWebResponse) httpReq.GetResponse();

Console.WriteLine("httpRes.StatusCode name = {0}",
httpRes.StatusCode) ;
Console.WriteLine("httpRes.StatusCode value = {0}",
(int) httpRes.StatusCode) ;

// Close the response.
httpRes.Close();
}
}
}
Hope this helps.

Chris.
-------------
C.R. Timmons Consulting, Inc.
http://www.crtimmonsinc.com/

Nov 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote
in news:eV**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl:
Thanks for the copy and pasted code Chris. ;-) I used a similar
snippet and read the same statement regarding the enumeration...

Using the remote MSDN copy of what we have locally...
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...library/en-us/
cpref/html/frlrfsystemnethttpstatuscodeclasstopic.asp

To make the long story short I was not casting the StatusCode
property to an int. How would I know? Am I to understand that
all enums return an integer type?
Clinton,

Int32 is the default type for enums. You can specify any other
integral type (except System.Char) as the type for an enum.

Enums can be a little confusing. A fair amount of casting has to be
used when accessing an enum value. There's also one way to create an
enum, and another way to access its properties and methods.

Creating an enum is done via the enum keyword:

// Using the default System.Int32 (C# "int) type:
public enum Enum1 { Value1 = 1, Value2 = 2 }

// Using the System.Byte (C# "byte") type:
public enum Enum2 : byte { Value1 = 128, Value2 = 138 }

Enum instances can be accessed using the methods and
properties defined in the System.Enum class. The help entries for
this class have several examples.

// Note the curiosity regarding no requirement to use the
ToString( ) method
nor cast the same property to an int unless I would have somehow
known to
do so. These circumstantial uses of type are keeping me
confused.


The C# Language Reference, while dry at times, is invaluable in
learning all of the nuances and quirks of C#. Section 7.7.4 covers
the addition operator (+). For string addition where only one of the
operands is a string, the compiler will call the .ToString() method
of the non-string operand. You can see this in action by overriding
the .ToString() method of a simple class:
using System;

namespace ExampleNamespace
{
public class ToStringClass
{
// By default, ToString() returns the fully
// qualified name of its type. Comment out this
// ToString() method to see what would otherwise be printed
// by the code in the Main() method...

public override string ToString()
{
return "42";
}
}

public class ExampleClass
{
[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
ToStringClass tsc = new ToStringClass();

string msg =
"The answer to life, the universe and " +
"everything is " + tsc;

Console.WriteLine(msg) ;
}
}
}
Hope this helps.

Chris.
-------------
C.R. Timmons Consulting, Inc.
http://www.crtimmonsinc.com/
Nov 18 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Chris R. Timmons" <crtimmons@X_NOSPAM_Xcrtimmonsinc.com> wrote in
message news:Xn**********************************@207.46.2 48.16...
"clintonG" <csgallagher@RE************@metromilwaukee.com> wrote
in news:eV**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl:
Thanks for the copy and pasted code Chris. ;-) I used a similar
snippet and read the same statement regarding the enumeration...

Using the remote MSDN copy of what we have locally...
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...library/en-us/
cpref/html/frlrfsystemnethttpstatuscodeclasstopic.asp

To make the long story short I was not casting the StatusCode
property to an int. How would I know? Am I to understand that
all enums return an integer type?
Clinton,

Int32 is the default type for enums. You can specify any other
integral type (except System.Char) as the type for an enum.

Enums can be a little confusing. A fair amount of casting has to be
used when accessing an enum value. There's also one way to create an
enum, and another way to access its properties and methods.

Creating an enum is done via the enum keyword:

// Using the default System.Int32 (C# "int) type:
public enum Enum1 { Value1 = 1, Value2 = 2 }

// Using the System.Byte (C# "byte") type:
public enum Enum2 : byte { Value1 = 128, Value2 = 138 }

Enum instances can be accessed using the methods and
properties defined in the System.Enum class. The help entries for
this class have several examples.

// Note the curiosity regarding no requirement to use the
ToString( ) method
nor cast the same property to an int unless I would have somehow
known to
do so. These circumstantial uses of type are keeping me
confused.


The C# Language Reference, while dry at times, is invaluable in
learning all of the nuances and quirks of C#. Section 7.7.4 covers
the addition operator (+). For string addition where only one of the

operands is a string, the compiler will call the .ToString() method
of the non-string operand. You can see this in action by overriding
the .ToString() method of a simple class:
using System;

namespace ExampleNamespace
{
public class ToStringClass
{
// By default, ToString() returns the fully
// qualified name of its type. Comment out this
// ToString() method to see what would otherwise be printed
// by the code in the Main() method...

public override string ToString()
{
return "42";
}
}

public class ExampleClass
{
[STAThread]
public static void Main()
{
ToStringClass tsc = new ToStringClass();

string msg =
"The answer to life, the universe and " +
"everything is " + tsc;

Console.WriteLine(msg) ;
}
}
}
Hope this helps.

Chris.
-------------
C.R. Timmons Consulting, Inc.
http://www.crtimmonsinc.com/


Thanks so much for the lucid explanations Chris. I will be making an
effort to make a thorough study of enums as well as study of the
C# language reference with regard to its type casting behaviors.

<%= Clinton
Nov 18 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.