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return from ASP.NET to ASP

Hi,
I updated to aspx last three month,after developing serveral
applications,Idecided to downgraded to asp, following is my reasons:
1.in ASPX,the page format is hard to control,in ASP u can change every html
as u like ,but in aspx, a aspx control decide the page format,and its hard
to change the format.

2.ASPX is said to be faster that asp, but it is based on too-often
communication back to the server,for example,u click a radio a button,there
is new page request, but in reality,such a communication is
bandwidth-consuming and time-consuming. the user only need to submit the
form, and the exchange between IE and Server was minimazed.
the Speed of ASPX is not useful for most sites, for bigger sites, the speed
increase is singnificant,but for small sites with less traffic, the speed of
ASP is quite enough.

3.ASPX is based on Object Orinted Programming, but in most small sites,
Procedure orinted programming is used, we never build objects, and POP is
more efficient.ASPX is for three-tiered structure with a single layer of
business logic component, but in reality, most of us used two-tier
structure,that is Presetation layer and Datalayer, we can layout the page
and change the database in a single page, quite effienct too.

how about ur comment?

Nakhi
Lijiang,China
Jul 19 '05 #1
1 1756
nakhi wrote:
Hi,
I updated to aspx last three month,after developing serveral
applications,Idecided to downgraded to asp, following is my reasons:
1.in ASPX,the page format is hard to control,in ASP u can change every html
as u like ,but in aspx, a aspx control decide the page format,and its hard
to change the format. Yes. ASPX reminds me of Visual InterDev's Scripting Object Model(SOM),
which I learned initially out of curiosity but which I then as quickly
abandoned due to it's clumsiness and overhead. I find that generating
HTML is quite clear and straightforward, whereas setting attributes and
calling methods that (only later) do the HTML generation to be an
unwanted and unnecessary level of indirection.
2.ASPX is said to be faster that asp, I wonder if this is really so. Initially Microsoft would not allow
benchmarking of ASPX; if you used a pre-production version of the .NET
framework the EULA prohibited benchmarking. I don't know of any current
benchmarks that are not biased in some way. Has anyone done a valid
comparison of ASP versus ASPX?
but it is based on too-often
communication back to the server,for example,u click a radio a button,there
is new page request, but in reality,such a communication is
bandwidth-consuming and time-consuming. the user only need to submit the
form, and the exchange between IE and Server was minimazed. This was also present in the older SOM when the ASP page was set to do
server-side processing.
the Speed of ASPX is not useful for most sites, for bigger sites, the speed
increase is singnificant,but for small sites with less traffic, the speed of
ASP is quite enough. And if it isn't enough, the cost of additional memory or a faster
processor is quite low.
3.ASPX is based on Object Orinted Programming, And it's object-oriented all the way down to the lowest level,
Microsoft's developers might be proud to add!-) Unfortunately that
doesn't necessarily help produce production code.

One humorous part of this is ADO.NET's attempt at "objectifying"
relational database structure: I burst out laughing when I first read
about DataRelations. Now I'm well aware of the so-called "impedance
mismatch" problem (where object-oriented languages meet relational
databases), but the best solution IMO is to maintain all relationships
and business rules in the database per se and NOT to move them up into a
separate "business tier". But the latter is Microsoft's apparent
approach, so the "objectification" of .NET reaches into what is IMO
properly the database domain.

Time will tell if Microsoft's approach will be fruitful. But relational
databases have been around a long time and to use them merely as
repositories of disconnected data without internal referential integrity
and data constraints or to attempt to duplicate their internal
consistency rules needlessly in a separate business layer is to regress
to an earlier era of data processing. Luckily one has an implementation
choice in these matters (i.e., .NET doesn't _force_ you to use a
business rule layer). but in most small sites,
Procedure orinted programming is used, we never build objects, and POP is
more efficient.ASPX is for three-tiered structure with a single layer of
business logic component, but in reality, most of us used two-tier
structure,that is Presetation layer and Datalayer, we can layout the page
and change the database in a single page, quite effienct too.
how about ur comment?
Nakhi
Lijiang,China

I agree. Of course, this _is_ an ASP newsgroup!8-))

Good Luck,
Michael D. Kersey

Jul 19 '05 #2

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