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ASP upload best practice question / help

P: n/a
Folks

Please bear with me - I'm not a real ASP pro...

I need some advice about the following problem:

I have "inherited" of a working ASP site which is hosted on a
collocated IIS machine.

At some point the site offers the possibility for any user to fill a
form and upload a file that is then dispatched, with the content of the
form, to an e-mail address.

The "legacy" code uses Scripting.FileSystemObject to transfer
(write) the file from the user POST to a local directory of the IIS
server. An e-mail message is then created, the said file attached and
the message submitted.

Our hosting company has recently replaced the IIS server and they are
very reluctant to give IUSR_<machinename> (the user running the ASP
code) write access to the local directory we were using.

So my question is: what is the best practice in such cases ?

Any info / pointer most welcome

Regards
--alexT

Mar 8 '06 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a

AlexT wrote:
Folks

Please bear with me - I'm not a real ASP pro...

I need some advice about the following problem:

I have "inherited" of a working ASP site which is hosted on a
collocated IIS machine.

At some point the site offers the possibility for any user to fill a
form and upload a file that is then dispatched, with the content of the
form, to an e-mail address.

The "legacy" code uses Scripting.FileSystemObject to transfer
(write) the file from the user POST to a local directory of the IIS
server. An e-mail message is then created, the said file attached and
the message submitted.

Our hosting company has recently replaced the IIS server and they are
very reluctant to give IUSR_<machinename> (the user running the ASP
code) write access to the local directory we were using.

So my question is: what is the best practice in such cases ?

Any info / pointer most welcome

Regards
--alexT


Best practice is that the service provider tries to offer the customer
solutions. What does your hosting company propose you do instead?

--
Mike Brind

Mar 8 '06 #2

P: n/a
They are reviewing the issue, for what it's worth...

--alexT

Mar 8 '06 #3

P: n/a

AlexT wrote:
They are reviewing the issue, for what it's worth...

--alexT


Then you should be reviewing them too, and you should be letting them
know that. After all, you pay the bills. And I'm sure for every one
hosting company that takes this kind of approach, there are hundreds
who will say "no problem", or, "here's an alternative that won't
interfere with your service".

Incidentally, when you reply to a post using Google Groups, don't use
the "Reply" link at the bottom of the post - it wipes out what you are
replying too, and people accessing the message through newsreaders that
don't thread won't have the foggiest what you are talking about.

Instead, click on Show Options at the top of the post and use the Reply
link there. I keeps the messages intact.

I know that Google Groups is in Beta, but the way they've programmed
the reply mechanism, well... you'd almost think they own Usenet!

--
Mike Brind

Mar 8 '06 #4

P: n/a
AlexT wrote:
Our hosting company has recently replaced the IIS server and
they are very reluctant to give IUSR_<machinename> (the user
running the ASP code) write access to the local directory we
were using.


See if they will provide write access to a dedicated subdirectory. The
uploaded file need not sit where the scripts do.

--
Dave Anderson

Unsolicited commercial email will be read at a cost of $500 per message. Use
of this email address implies consent to these terms. Please do not contact
me directly or ask me to contact you directly for assistance. If your
question is worth asking, it's worth posting.
Mar 8 '06 #5

P: n/a

Dave Anderson wrote:
AlexT wrote:
Our hosting company has recently replaced the IIS server and
they are very reluctant to give IUSR_<machinename> (the user
running the ASP code) write access to the local directory we
were using.


See if they will provide write access to a dedicated subdirectory. The
uploaded file need not sit where the scripts do.


There are plenty of hosting providers that will allow you to control
access to your own directory, and everything below it.

Mar 8 '06 #6

P: n/a
There are plenty of hosting providers that will allow you to control
access to your own directory, and everything below it.


so the consensus is that there nothing inherently wrong with my
scripting and that I should lobby my hosting company ?

Regards

--alexT

Mar 9 '06 #7

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