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Reenter your password functionality

P: 2
I am currently working on a database that requires passwords and accounts, during the registration I am wanting to have the user enter a string password into one textbox and then an additional one. I would like to check the textboxes to ensure that they match. Any help is much appreciated, Thanks in Advance!
Jun 20 '17 #1

✓ answered by NeoPa

Hi.

OTOH ==> On the other hand.
Using operating System accounts (IE. What you log onto the computer or network as.) saves you all that hassle as well as being a lot more reliable.

IE. In most cases you already have the user logging on to identify themselves. Why build a new system to duplicate what you already have, and have access to?

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3 Replies


NeoPa
Expert Mod 15k+
P: 31,419
So, you know what you want to do. How far are you getting before you're stuck?

Consider also, that in most systems nowadays you already have account information in as much as the user must log on to their system before they can get access to the database. This information is always available (Function to Return UserName (NT Login) of Current User) so it nearly always makes sense to use that instead of trying to roll your own.

If you really must roll your own then at the very least you should make sure that the passwords are never stored in plain text. That's criminal behaviour. I actually mean that. Almost. In some instances it actually can be considered criminal as it exposes users' passwords to those who would use the information for further criminal acts. This affects more than just those systems you're responsible for as users often use the same passwords in multiple systems. Hence the possibility of exposing yourself to criminal prosecution unless you can show you've taken reasonable measures to prevent that. An Access database with passwords stored in plain text is certainly not an example of reasonable measures.

OTOH using O/S accounts saves you all that hassle as well as being a lot more reliable.
Jun 20 '17 #2

P: 2
Some additional context. The database never stores passwords in plain text, nor are they ever entered in plain text. I have a function set up that is capable of login functionality. The problem I am having is occuring during the registration of a user. I am looking to create an extra barrier or poka-yoke to minimize future issues by making the user enter their password twice and check that it is the password they are wanting to save instead of just entering their password once.

Where am I getting stuck? I think that this could be achieved with a DLookup function in the VBA code of the form but I am not sure that is the best way to go about it

I am fairly new to heavy Access & VBA usage so I don't fully understand your last sentence, if you could clarify slightly I would be much obliged.

Thanks for answering!
Jun 20 '17 #3

NeoPa
Expert Mod 15k+
P: 31,419
Hi.

OTOH ==> On the other hand.
Using operating System accounts (IE. What you log onto the computer or network as.) saves you all that hassle as well as being a lot more reliable.

IE. In most cases you already have the user logging on to identify themselves. Why build a new system to duplicate what you already have, and have access to?
Jun 20 '17 #4

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