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Access 2010 Lost Data

P: 14
My client is running an Access 2010 database, front-end linked to back-end. Users are few, only one or two. Yesterday, I needed them to send me a copy of the back-end so that I'm looking at the same data. They sent me a compressed copy, and went on with their day. Today, they noticed that, after researching, all the data they entered yesterday (one person, a lot, the second only changed a few records) was gone. They have reports printed from last night that show the data in there. I am at a loss as to what could have happened to yesterday's data. We ran Compact/Repair today, but no change. We've never lost data in 10 years with this database.
Mar 7 '12 #1

✓ answered by Stewart Ross

We're all in the dark about this one, but in my view losing a whole day's worth of data suggests that the back-end database has been overwritten with a previous version.

Access stores records to its tables on a row-by-row basis as they are entered. Other than by deliberate deletion, there is no way that Access can 'lose' or 'not store' a day's data.

Access 2010 is no different in this respect than its 2007 or 2003 predecessors - the database engine simply does not take days into account when storing data, so losing a whole day's data suggests that a restore from a previous version really has taken place, by accident I guess.

-Stewart

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8 Replies


TheSmileyCoder
Expert Mod 100+
P: 2,321
Did they just make a manual copy of the backend file, or did they use any built-in tools? or third party tools?

I am wondering if some built in tool could have started a transaction that went unconcluded, to finally be rolled back when they closed the db. But to be honest I am pretty much shooting in the dark here.
Mar 7 '12 #2

P: 14
They only manually made a compressed zipped file and sent me that. There was no other copy made. It's very odd, and driving me crazy trying to figure it out.
Mar 8 '12 #3

NeoPa
Expert Mod 15k+
P: 31,307
Nothing obvious occurs Karen. As in most such cases, and quite understandably, the information that would lead to an answer is not available in the question. If you recognised the information that eventually turned out to be critical, then you would probably not have needed to ask in the first place of course.
Mar 8 '12 #4

TheSmileyCoder
Expert Mod 100+
P: 2,321
I presume they would have told you if they had some fatal error that triggered a Compact and Repair?

I had a client once, which migrated their network file server to a external company that claimed high and mighty that there would be no trouble with the data. We would not need to do anything to synchronize it, they would handle it all, and automatically remap the network drives. (Im not a network file server guru, on the contrary so if any of the above is in-correct details, then so be it)

Now just around the same time we had to release a 500 page report from the Access tool. We were 4 people at work doing last minute checks and editing proably between 200 or 300 of the 3k records included in that report. Just as in your case we made the report, and made a pdf. This was in fact a major milestone in the project, and once that was down I think it was around a month before I returned to do stuff in the application. Thats when I realised first that some of the data was missing (And then later that alot/all data entered that day was missing.

The external company that was now handling the file server claimed that I had probably messed up my files. Now I know that the information was entered, cause I had the pdf report to proove it.
I tried, but I couldn't get information on WHEN they had switched the servers, so was unsure if that indeed was the problem, allthough it was the most logical explanation.

Well best option I could get was to get a restore from that day. Now the service contract with the company stated that they had 5 working days to respond to issues raised. And guess what...it took them 4 days and 23 hours to restore the file...
They kindly placed it in a subfolder of the original file location. They just forgot to give me read/write access to it..... guess how long it took them to fix the rights. Yup! 4 days, 23 hours.

Turned out the restore did not contain the information we had entered that day. Now desperate, I asked for all restores from 3 days before our release and 3 days after (Figured it would be better to ask for them all since I knew I was in for a 5 day wait). Of course, they once again forgot to give me the correct permissions to access the files, and another 5 day way. Now those files also did not contain the information I needed.

The information in the database is highly critical and safety related for a mayor railroad company. Every action is logged in the database, and there is alot of (internal) information that is not available in the pdf, so recreating the data based on the pdf was not a "real" option. Telling the safety authorities that we had lost the information and had no backup was also not a real option, since this is something we MUST have control of.

Finally I got the idea to track down the original guy mainting the servers while they were still kept inside the firm. He managed to give me acces to the old servers and low and behold, I finally found my information.


Sorry if there was alot of bile in this post. I guess I had something I needed of my chest :P

I think my story could be a longshot, and don't really know if it applies for you. It just has alot of similarities, so thought I would share it.
Mar 8 '12 #5

P: 14
Thanks so much, SmileyCode, for your response. Wow, what a story! How frustrating to have waited so long for your problem-solving. You must have bitten all your nails off! Thankfully we just lost one day. We are so careful. I know the staff would've called me immediately had they received any kind of error; they're great. We've never had a problem in 10 years, and I just can't figure out what couldv'e caused it.
Mar 8 '12 #6

Expert Mod 2.5K+
P: 2,545
We're all in the dark about this one, but in my view losing a whole day's worth of data suggests that the back-end database has been overwritten with a previous version.

Access stores records to its tables on a row-by-row basis as they are entered. Other than by deliberate deletion, there is no way that Access can 'lose' or 'not store' a day's data.

Access 2010 is no different in this respect than its 2007 or 2003 predecessors - the database engine simply does not take days into account when storing data, so losing a whole day's data suggests that a restore from a previous version really has taken place, by accident I guess.

-Stewart
Mar 8 '12 #7

P: 14
Mystery solved! It has been bothering me so much, I kept thinking, thinking... You are absolutley right, had to have been written over. They had two zipped files in the folder, one for the backend she'd sent me the day before, and now one for the frontend with the updates I'd sent. (It's not typical for us to have a zipped backend out there.) I remembered that she'd tried to update the frontend, and first asked me, "Where is that new report you added? I don't see it. I'll try the update again." When she tried a second time, she saw the new report. That got me thinking that she must've accidentally extracted the backend the first time, written over the master backend, and that's why we never saw another copy with a recent modification date. The master backend had been written over/replaced when she accidentally unzipped and extracted the wrong file. We try to be so careful, but we humans are capable of accidents! We've had a stable database for over 10 years, and I'm glad I don't have to live with doubting it. Thank you all very, very much for trouble-shooting this with me!
Mar 9 '12 #8

NeoPa
Expert Mod 15k+
P: 31,307
Considering the lack of clues, I'm doubly impressed - yet again - at Stewart's ability to find an answer anyway. Might be worth a Best Answer too, as it's the sort of thing one searches for and it could help others who do, to be directed to the most likely cause.

It's also very gratifying to hear you have your conundrum resolved of course Karen :-)
Mar 9 '12 #9

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