By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
434,870 Members | 2,347 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 434,870 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Requiring user to re-login periodically

P: n/a
I'm using the Access User-Level Security features with various users
set up.

I have a form/timer all set up to trigger an event after a period of
inactivity.

I'd like that event to log off a user and force them to log back in or
to require them to login periodically. The reason for this is that
multiple people use the database and I want to make sure the current
user is the logged in person.

Also, I'd like to configure a button for them to log off when they
walk away from the computer.

On top of that, I'm wondering if this can be done without kicking them
out of the database and having to reload it every time.
Aug 18 '08 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
6 Replies


P: n/a
"RussCRM" <sr*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:8c**********************************@56g2000h sm.googlegroups.com...
I'm using the Access User-Level Security features with various users
set up.

I have a form/timer all set up to trigger an event after a period of
inactivity.

I'd like that event to log off a user and force them to log back in or
to require them to login periodically. The reason for this is that
multiple people use the database and I want to make sure the current
user is the logged in person.

Also, I'd like to configure a button for them to log off when they
walk away from the computer.

On top of that, I'm wondering if this can be done without kicking them
out of the database and having to reload it every time.

To the best of my knowledge, no, there is no way to log out without closing
the database. If you want to do that, it's simply DoCmd.CloseDatabase.
You'll need to make very sure that your users really are not currently using
the application and have saved any pending updates, though. And at the end
of the day, will it really accomplish your goal? Doing this may decrease the
probability that the person using the app is not the person who logged in,
but it cannot completely prevent it.

--
Brendan Reynolds

Aug 19 '08 #2

P: n/a
sounds to me like you're be much better off using Integrated Windows
Security with SQL Server and Access Data Projects

File, New, Project (existing data) in Access 2003

On Aug 18, 1:01*pm, RussCRM <srusskin...@gmail.comwrote:
I'm using the Access User-Level Security features with various users
set up.

I have a form/timer all set up to trigger an event after a period of
inactivity.

I'd like that event to log off a user and force them to log back in or
to require them to login periodically. *The reason for this is that
multiple people use the database and I want to make sure the current
user is the logged in person.

Also, I'd like to configure a button for them to log off when they
walk away from the computer.

On top of that, I'm wondering if this can be done without kicking them
out of the database and having to reload it every time.
Aug 19 '08 #3

P: n/a
Thanks for the advice! I've never gone to the level of an Access Data
Project, but we'll give it a try!

I don't suppose there's a way to close the database and then reopen it
via code is there?
Aug 19 '08 #4

P: n/a
I urge you to check out other postings by Aaron. His invariable
"suggestion" to use ADP and SQL Server has been "discussed" at length, and
seems to be recommended mostly by Aaron. He does not have a history of
providing solid, detailed advice. Also, ADP is supported for backward
compatibility, as I understand it, so it may not be the best choice for a
new project.

"Rustle" <sr*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:d8**********************************@56g2000h sm.googlegroups.com...
Thanks for the advice! I've never gone to the level of an Access Data
Project, but we'll give it a try!

I don't suppose there's a way to close the database and then reopen it
via code is there?
Aug 19 '08 #5

P: n/a
Thanks! I've been learning about database design on the fly for about
a year now and still feel like I've barely scratched the surface! So
many "simple" ideas to you pros are an enigma to us newbies, so know
that we appreciate the help immensely!
Aug 19 '08 #6

P: n/a
I tried looking at this but it requires SQL Server 2000 Desktop
Engine, which I can't figure out how to install.

Aug 22 '08 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.