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Replication rules in Access 2003 ??

P: n/a

I have inherited an application written in Access that is a replicated
copy from the PC that was used to develop the app. When we had both
PCs, we synced the DB nightly.

The master PC is gone.

Can I buy a copy of Access and install it on a second PC and then
start syncing the DB with what I have running on my machine?

If we can't get a copy of Access 2003, will the Access 2007 work with
my Access 2003 or do we both have to upgrade?

Thanks

--
Al Dykes
News is something someone wants to suppress, everything else is advertising.
- Lord Northcliffe, publisher of the Daily Mail

Aug 3 '08 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
On 3 Aug 2008 08:25:22 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

First decide if you really need replication. It is an advanced topic
and you just discovered the company may not be ready for it or that PC
would not be gone without some consideration.

You can use the "Recover design master" procedure to promote your
replica to a design master.

I don't know if it is technically possible to run in a mixed
environment (I would assume it is), but I would not run the risk.
Think how much work the Microsoft Access development team has put into
replication. Think how much time into testing. Think how much time
into testing in a mixed environment. Weigh that against the price of
an upgrade.

-Tom.
Microsoft Access MVP

>
I have inherited an application written in Access that is a replicated
copy from the PC that was used to develop the app. When we had both
PCs, we synced the DB nightly.

The master PC is gone.

Can I buy a copy of Access and install it on a second PC and then
start syncing the DB with what I have running on my machine?

If we can't get a copy of Access 2003, will the Access 2007 work with
my Access 2003 or do we both have to upgrade?

Thanks
Aug 3 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Sun, 03 Aug 2008 07:03:38 -0700, Tom van Stiphout
<no*************@cox.netwrote:

Oh, and after recovering the DM create two new replicas, one for each
computer. You don't want to use the DM for production.

-Tom.

>On 3 Aug 2008 08:25:22 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

First decide if you really need replication. It is an advanced topic
and you just discovered the company may not be ready for it or that PC
would not be gone without some consideration.

You can use the "Recover design master" procedure to promote your
replica to a design master.

I don't know if it is technically possible to run in a mixed
environment (I would assume it is), but I would not run the risk.
Think how much work the Microsoft Access development team has put into
replication. Think how much time into testing. Think how much time
into testing in a mixed environment. Weigh that against the price of
an upgrade.

-Tom.
Microsoft Access MVP

>>
I have inherited an application written in Access that is a replicated
copy from the PC that was used to develop the app. When we had both
PCs, we synced the DB nightly.

The master PC is gone.

Can I buy a copy of Access and install it on a second PC and then
start syncing the DB with what I have running on my machine?

If we can't get a copy of Access 2003, will the Access 2007 work with
my Access 2003 or do we both have to upgrade?

Thanks
Aug 3 '08 #3

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.netwrote in
news:kd********************************@4ax.com:
I don't know if it is technically possible to run in a mixed
environment (I would assume it is), but I would not run the risk.
Think how much work the Microsoft Access development team has put
into replication. Think how much time into testing. Think how much
time into testing in a mixed environment. Weigh that against the
price of an upgrade.
It should run just fine in a mixed environment, assuming:

1. split architecture, AND

2. only data replicated.

MDB is a native format for A2K7 and replication is a full-fledged
part of the MDB format.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Aug 3 '08 #4

P: n/a
In article <kd********************************@4ax.com>,
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.netwrote:
>On 3 Aug 2008 08:25:22 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

First decide if you really need replication. It is an advanced topic
and you just discovered the company may not be ready for it or that PC
would not be gone without some consideration.

What is the alternative to replication for a multi-site Access application?

FWIW, the guy that developed the app ran it and modified
it on his laptop and replicated it with mine and I got all functional modifications
along with the updates data.

(Thanks, everyone, for the thoughtful responses. I'm soaking it all in)

--
Al Dykes
News is something someone wants to suppress, everything else is advertising.
- Lord Northcliffe, publisher of the Daily Mail

Aug 4 '08 #5

P: n/a
On 3 Aug 2008 20:26:34 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

That all depends on how much data needs to be sync'ed. In some
organizations individual locations run pretty much on their own, only
sending summary data to headquarters, while in others there is a lot
of sharing of information going on. You be the judge.

You will agree with me that the organization was not quite ready for
replication when it decided to dump that PC without consideration for
the implications. "Oh I was not aware something bad could happen". If
that's a common attitude, replication may not be for you/them. It
requires attention and discipline.

-Tom.
>In article <kd********************************@4ax.com>,
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.netwrote:
>>On 3 Aug 2008 08:25:22 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

First decide if you really need replication. It is an advanced topic
and you just discovered the company may not be ready for it or that PC
would not be gone without some consideration.


What is the alternative to replication for a multi-site Access application?

FWIW, the guy that developed the app ran it and modified
it on his laptop and replicated it with mine and I got all functional modifications
along with the updates data.

(Thanks, everyone, for the thoughtful responses. I'm soaking it all in)
Aug 4 '08 #6

P: n/a
In article <ef********************************@4ax.com>,
Tom van Stiphout <no*************@cox.netwrote:
>On 3 Aug 2008 20:26:34 -0400, ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote:

That all depends on how much data needs to be sync'ed. In some
organizations individual locations run pretty much on their own, only
sending summary data to headquarters, while in others there is a lot
of sharing of information going on. You be the judge.
How much typing can one person do?

The DB is ~10MB and we sent to back and forth as an email attachment.
>
You will agree with me that the organization was not quite ready for
replication when it decided to dump that PC without consideration for

"Management", while great at what they do, is clueless about what made
things work. For not educating the boss, I fault the guy that
developed the app since he was at the "head office" was involved with
the boss daily and I was at the remote location and when I was working
with the head guy, it was focused and very busy.
--
Al Dykes
News is something someone wants to suppress, everything else is advertising.
- Lord Northcliffe, publisher of the Daily Mail

Aug 4 '08 #7

P: n/a
ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in
news:g7**********@panix5.panix.com:
The DB is ~10MB and we sent to back and forth as an email
attachment.
If that was a replicated DB, then you've got serious problems ahead
of you. Replicas cannot be moved once they have live data in them --
they must be edited and synched in one location and one location
only.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Aug 5 '08 #8

P: n/a
In article <Xn**********************************@64.209.0.91> ,
David W. Fenton <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalidwrote:
>ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in
news:g7**********@panix5.panix.com:
>The DB is ~10MB and we sent to back and forth as an email
attachment.

If that was a replicated DB, then you've got serious problems ahead
of you. Replicas cannot be moved once they have live data in them --
they must be edited and synched in one location and one location
only.

I don't understand. What is a "location" for the purposes of this
discussion?


--
Al Dykes
News is something someone wants to suppress, everything else is advertising.
- Lord Northcliffe, publisher of the Daily Mail

Aug 5 '08 #9

P: n/a
ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in
news:g7**********@panix5.panix.com:
In article <Xn**********************************@64.209.0.91> ,
David W. Fenton <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalidwrote:
>>ad****@panix.com (Al Dykes) wrote in
news:g7**********@panix5.panix.com:
>>The DB is ~10MB and we sent to back and forth as an email
attachment.

If that was a replicated DB, then you've got serious problems
ahead of you. Replicas cannot be moved once they have live data in
them -- they must be edited and synched in one location and one
location only.

I don't understand. What is a "location" for the purposes of this
discussion?
A particular drive/path on a particular machine. On PC \\MyPC the
replica C:\Replicas\MyReplica.mdb must always stay in that folder
with the same name. Change the folder name or the replica name or
the PC name or move the replica to a USB stick, or email it to
someone else, and it is no longer the same replica.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Aug 6 '08 #10

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