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SQL in place of Adodc. How is it done?

I have been using Adodc recently to link my system in vb6 to my detabase until our professor required us recently to use SQL which is completely new to me and ive never encountered before. How is it related or is it related to Adodc or Adodb?im still on the process of researching my problem but since it is urgent i already posted it for me not to get stuck between these projects. I hope you understand and give some help.thanks and more power.
Mar 5 '08 #1
3 1553
Scott Price
1,384 Expert 1GB
SQL stands for Structured Query Language and is the standard (with various flavors) for querying any database anywhere in the world (just about).

ADO stands for ActiveX Data Objects and is a language used to connect databases.

The two languages are not mutually exclusive and actually make use of each other. This makes me think your professor is actually throwing you a curve ball, since using ADO for the connection requires you to use SQL for the queries.

Regards,
Scott
Mar 5 '08 #2
SQL stands for Structured Query Language and is the standard (with various flavors) for querying any database anywhere in the world (just about).

ADO stands for ActiveX Data Objects and is a language used to connect databases.

The two languages are not mutually exclusive and actually make use of each other. This makes me think your professor is actually throwing you a curve ball, since using ADO for the connection requires you to use SQL for the queries.

Regards,
Scott
Is that so? ah okay. . .
What about their use as a connection from the database to the system? For instance you are using VB?
Mar 12 '08 #3
Scott Price
1,384 Expert 1GB
The process is:

You make the connection from your front end GUI (written in VB6?) using ADODC.

SQL does not provide any connection capabilities. SQL is an international query language standard that is platform independent. That means that it doesn't matter which program you are using as a database manager, the basic SQL syntax stays the same as any other Relational DataBase Management System... Various software companies have added different specific high-level implementations to the basic SQL standard (MS' flavor is called T-SQL or Transact SQL), however they still do not provide the connection code.

A likely scenario is that you create the connection using a command from VB6. In the next lines of code you 'query' the database using an SQL statement which is going to take the form of: "SELECT [something] FROM [sometable] WHERE [somecondition]"

Regards,
Scott
Mar 12 '08 #4

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