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once upon a time... : linked tables

P: n/a
hi,

once upon a time I read that the communication with the back end would be
faster if one table there was kept open.
For that purpose you were supposed to make an otherwise useless table in the
back end, link to it and open it when opening the front end, keeping it open
until you close the front end.
Is this a indeed viable and useful?

thanks voor your thoughts and experience

Michiel
Jan 31 '08 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
Michiel Rapati-Kekkonen wrote:
hi,

once upon a time I read that the communication with the back end
would be faster if one table there was kept open.
For that purpose you were supposed to make an otherwise useless table
in the back end, link to it and open it when opening the front end,
keeping it open until you close the front end.
Is this a indeed viable and useful?

thanks voor your thoughts and experience

Michiel
Yes. Most of the benefit is that the LDB file has to be created (or modified)
when you open the back end file and there is a slight delay while that happens.
If you keep a persistent connection then that delay happens only once.
Otherwise that delay is incurred over and over each time you connect to the file
when there are no other existing connections.

You don't really have to create a "useless table" to do this though. Just open
a bound form or a VBA Recordset in code at startup and leave it open. It
doesn't really matter what table is used.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Jan 31 '08 #2

P: n/a
and every little helps.
do you know of more of such somewhat unexpected ways of improving
performance.
or is such question too general?

Michiel

"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:O8*****************@newssvr19.news.prodigy.ne t...
Michiel Rapati-Kekkonen wrote:
>hi,

once upon a time I read that the communication with the back end
would be faster if one table there was kept open.
For that purpose you were supposed to make an otherwise useless table
in the back end, link to it and open it when opening the front end,
keeping it open until you close the front end.
Is this a indeed viable and useful?

thanks voor your thoughts and experience

Michiel

Yes. Most of the benefit is that the LDB file has to be created (or
modified) when you open the back end file and there is a slight delay
while that happens. If you keep a persistent connection then that delay
happens only once. Otherwise that delay is incurred over and over each
time you connect to the file when there are no other existing connections.

You don't really have to create a "useless table" to do this though. Just
open a bound form or a VBA Recordset in code at startup and leave it open.
It doesn't really matter what table is used.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com

Jan 31 '08 #3

P: n/a
http://www.granite.ab.ca/Access/performancefaq.htm

John

"Michiel Rapati-Kekkonen" <mi*****@nonsense.zzschreef in bericht
news:kM*************@read4.inet.fi...
and every little helps.
do you know of more of such somewhat unexpected ways of improving
performance.
or is such question too general?

Michiel

"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:O8*****************@newssvr19.news.prodigy.ne t...
>Michiel Rapati-Kekkonen wrote:
>>hi,

once upon a time I read that the communication with the back end
would be faster if one table there was kept open.
For that purpose you were supposed to make an otherwise useless table
in the back end, link to it and open it when opening the front end,
keeping it open until you close the front end.
Is this a indeed viable and useful?

thanks voor your thoughts and experience

Michiel

Yes. Most of the benefit is that the LDB file has to be created (or
modified) when you open the back end file and there is a slight delay
while that happens. If you keep a persistent connection then that delay
happens only once. Otherwise that delay is incurred over and over each
time you connect to the file when there are no other existing
connections.

You don't really have to create a "useless table" to do this though.
Just open a bound form or a VBA Recordset in code at startup and leave it
open. It doesn't really matter what table is used.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com


Feb 3 '08 #4

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