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Who has the *.DB open?

P: n/a
Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?

Dec 20 '07 #1
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14 Replies


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Roy
On Dec 20, 3:19 pm, Tom Louchbaum <t...@uwm.eduwrote:
Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?
Right click the .ldb file and open it with a text file.You can see
either the user name or the machine name.

There is a module in the site,http://www.mvps.org/access/modules/
index.html(LDB Viewer Form).Check this.

Roy
Dec 20 '07 #2

P: n/a
Tom Louchbaum wrote:
Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?
There's a couple of ways.

http://www.mvps.org/access/general/gen0034.htm

or if you know the ldb file name get to the command line and enter

Type LDBFileName.ldb
Strength
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcc2_lKy58I
Dec 20 '07 #3

P: n/a
Tom Louchbaum <tw*@uwm.eduwrote:
>Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?
Opening the .ldb file using notepad will show you both who's currently in the
database and some of the workstations which were in the database. When a person
exits Access their workstation name and Access login id, Admin unless you are using
Access security, are left in a "slot" or record in the ldb file. This slot or record
may get overwritten the next time someone enters the MDB depending on what slot or
record is available previous to it in the ldb file.

Determining the workstation which caused the Microsoft Access MDB corruption
http://www.granite.ab.ca/access/corr...orkstation.htm

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Dec 21 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Dec 20, 8:19*pm, Tom Louchbaum <t...@uwm.eduwrote:
Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?
Hi, Is there also a way to throw out users who have logged in, then
gone home without closing access?
Dec 21 '07 #5

P: n/a
Hi,

he***********@gmail.com wrote:
On Dec 20, 8:19 pm, Tom Louchbaum <t...@uwm.eduwrote:
>Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?

Hi, Is there also a way to throw out users who have logged in, then
gone home without closing access?
I remember several samples demonstrating this, take a look at the following
links :

Auto-Logout
http://www.amazecreations.com/datafast/Download.aspx

Kick Em Off
http://www.datastrat.com/Download2.html

http://www.rogersaccesslibrary.com/d...sOffNonUse.mdb

Regards
Jens

Dec 21 '07 #6

P: n/a
I have a client with many computer stations and they have upgraded about
half of them to Access2003 while the others remain with Access2000. The
databases I have created for them all seem to continue to run fine. However,
when I visit them to work on design changes I do not always get to sit at
the same computer. Sometimes I work at a A2000 workstation and other times I
work at a A2003 workstation.

I seem to experience more corruptions lately. I absolutely HATE seeing the
message, "Access has encountered a problem and must shut down." This is
evidently a new 'feature' in A2003. Interestingly, when I get this msg on a
A2003 workstation, I can sometimes go to a A2000 workstation and it will run
fine. This particular mdb resides on the server, not on either workstation.

Could this be related to conflicts in the references between versions?

I have noticed that the situation improves if I restrict myself to only
making design changes from a A2000 workstation.

Fred Zuckerman
Dec 21 '07 #7

P: n/a
Hi, Fred

I think it's not related to conflicts in the references between versions,
but as Allen mentioned yesterday in another thread, every version uses a
different binary. So it's recommended to decompile a database before you
edit it in another version.

Regards
Jens
Fred Zuckerman wrote:
I have a client with many computer stations and they have upgraded
about half of them to Access2003 while the others remain with
Access2000. The databases I have created for them all seem to
continue to run fine. However, when I visit them to work on design
changes I do not always get to sit at the same computer. Sometimes I
work at a A2000 workstation and other times I work at a A2003
workstation.
I seem to experience more corruptions lately. I absolutely HATE
seeing the message, "Access has encountered a problem and must shut
down." This is evidently a new 'feature' in A2003. Interestingly,
when I get this msg on a A2003 workstation, I can sometimes go to a
A2000 workstation and it will run fine. This particular mdb resides
on the server, not on either workstation.
Could this be related to conflicts in the references between versions?

I have noticed that the situation improves if I restrict myself to
only making design changes from a A2000 workstation.

Fred Zuckerman

Dec 21 '07 #8

P: n/a
Fred Zuckerman wrote:
>I have a client with many computer stations and they have upgraded
about half of them to Access2003 while the others remain with
Access2000. The databases I have created for them all seem to
continue to run fine. However, when I visit them to work on design
changes I do not always get to sit at the same computer. Sometimes I
work at a A2000 workstation and other times I work at a A2003
workstation.
I seem to experience more corruptions lately. I absolutely HATE
seeing the message, "Access has encountered a problem and must shut
down." This is evidently a new 'feature' in A2003. Interestingly,
when I get this msg on a A2003 workstation, I can sometimes go to a
A2000 workstation and it will run fine. This particular mdb resides
on the server, not on either workstation.
Could this be related to conflicts in the references between versions?

I have noticed that the situation improves if I restrict myself to
only making design changes from a A2000 workstation.

Fred Zuckerman
"Jens Schilling" <Je************************@fissership.dewrote in message
news:fk*************@news.t-online.com...
Hi, Fred

I think it's not related to conflicts in the references between versions,
but as Allen mentioned yesterday in another thread, every version uses a
different binary. So it's recommended to decompile a database before you
edit it in another version.

Regards
Jens
Thanks for the response Jens. Interesting...I hadn't thought about that. I
assume that decompiling and recompiling is best done on a A2000 workstation
for optimum backwards compatability, right?
Fred
Dec 21 '07 #9

P: n/a
Hi, Fred

Fred Zuckerman wrote:
>Fred Zuckerman wrote:
>>I have a client with many computer stations and they have upgraded
about half of them to Access2003 while the others remain with
Access2000. The databases I have created for them all seem to
continue to run fine. However, when I visit them to work on design
changes I do not always get to sit at the same computer. Sometimes I
work at a A2000 workstation and other times I work at a A2003
workstation.
I seem to experience more corruptions lately. I absolutely HATE
seeing the message, "Access has encountered a problem and must shut
down." This is evidently a new 'feature' in A2003. Interestingly,
when I get this msg on a A2003 workstation, I can sometimes go to a
A2000 workstation and it will run fine. This particular mdb resides
on the server, not on either workstation.
Could this be related to conflicts in the references between
versions? I have noticed that the situation improves if I restrict
myself to
only making design changes from a A2000 workstation.

Fred Zuckerman

"Jens Schilling" <Je************************@fissership.dewrote in
message news:fk*************@news.t-online.com...
>Hi, Fred

I think it's not related to conflicts in the references between
versions, but as Allen mentioned yesterday in another thread, every
version uses a different binary. So it's recommended to decompile a
database before you edit it in another version.

Regards
Jens
Thanks for the response Jens. Interesting...I hadn't thought about
that. I assume that decompiling and recompiling is best done on a
A2000 workstation for optimum backwards compatability, right?
Yes - but you should ensure that the latest service pack is installed on the
machine as especially A2000 need it to run in a stabil manner.

Regards
Jens

Dec 21 '07 #10

P: n/a
Tom Louchbaum <tw*@uwm.eduwrote in news:47***************@uwm.edu:
Is there someway to tell who has the *.DB open on a network?
http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/download/Access/Admin.zip

That has two methods, one using the ldbusr.dll and the other using
the ADO UserRoster function.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Dec 21 '07 #11

P: n/a
"Jens Schilling" <Je************************@fissership.dewrote in
news:fk*************@news.t-online.com:
you should ensure that the latest service pack is installed on the
machine as especially A2000 need it to run in a stabil manner.
For A2K all you need is SR1.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Dec 21 '07 #12

P: n/a
Hi, David

David W. Fenton wrote:
"Jens Schilling" <Je************************@fissership.dewrote in
news:fk*************@news.t-online.com:
>you should ensure that the latest service pack is installed on the
machine as especially A2000 need it to run in a stabil manner.

For A2K all you need is SR1.
I think there were some remarkable issues fixed with SP3

- 100 percent CPU usage
- incorrect value returned by the Sum function
- horizontal scroll bar in subforms
- SendObject

Just my 2C..

Regards
Jens


Dec 21 '07 #13

P: n/a
"Jens Schilling" <Je************************@fissership.dewrote:
>I assume that decompiling and recompiling is best done on a
>A2000 workstation for optimum backwards compatability, right?

Yes - but you should ensure that the latest service pack is installed on the
machine as especially A2000 need it to run in a stabil manner.
A2003 does puke on me as well occasionally. However decompiling on either version
wouldn't matter. I do all my work in A2003 as that has some nice features I like.
But I switch to A2000 to create the MDE and distribute the app.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Dec 22 '07 #14

P: n/a
On Dec 21, 7:05 am, "Fred Zuckerman" <Zuckerm...@sbcglobal.netwrote:
I have a client with many computer stations and they have upgraded about
half of them to Access2003 while the others remain with Access2000. The
databases I have created for them all seem to continue to run fine. However,
when I visit them to work on design changes I do not always get to sit at
the same computer. Sometimes I work at a A2000 workstation and other times I
work at a A2003 workstation.

I seem to experience more corruptions lately. I absolutely HATE seeing the
message, "Access has encountered a problemand must shut down." This is
evidently a new 'feature' in A2003. Interestingly, when I get this msg on a
A2003 workstation, I can sometimes go to a A2000 workstation and it will run
fine. This particular mdb resides on the server, not on either workstation.

Could this be related to conflicts in the references between versions?

I have noticed that the situation improves if I restrict myself to only
making design changes from a A2000 workstation.

Fred Zuckerman
Fred,

I hope your entire application isn't running from the server. For
multiple users, it is important that they run their own frontend on
their PC and share the data on the server by linking tables on the
server's .mdb/.mde. You can download the latest frontend from the
server to their PC when they login.

Using Access 2003 for development since it came out, I have found that
it crashes with the message you describe on some PCs but not others.
This isn't a scientific survey, but I have had more troubles, it
seems, on AMD CPU PCs. Also, I've reduced the number of incidents by
removing FMS add-ins, such as Code Library. While your operating
system should have all the latest service packs, I would warn against
Office 2003 SP3, which causes bizarre loss of functionality and
crashing (such as you are experiencing) throughout the Office 2003
Suite. Let's hope Microsoft fixes SP3 soon.

Best wishes,
Duane
Dec 22 '07 #15

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