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Getting back a deleted record

Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?

If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?

Thanks!

magmike

Oct 12 '07 #1
12 5276
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <ma******@yahoo.com>
wrote:

If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
from last night's backup as well.

Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!

Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
field.

-Tom.
>Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?

If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?

Thanks!

magmike
Oct 12 '07 #2
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?

If I had referential integrity setup (i'll need to research that),
what would have happened when I selected Delete Record?

mike

On Oct 12, 10:01 am, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
from last night's backup as well.

Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!

Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
field.

-Tom.
Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?
If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?
Thanks!
magmike- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?

Oct 12 '07 #3
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:55:24 -0000, magmike <ma******@yahoo.com>
wrote:

INSERT INTO SomeTable ( ID, SomeOtherField )
SELECT [Give ID:] AS Expr1, [Give SomeOtherField:] AS Expr2;

It would have said "Yo! Can't do that. There are related records in
other tables."
Just try it for yourself.

-Tom.
>got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?

If I had referential integrity setup (i'll need to research that),
what would have happened when I selected Delete Record?

mike

On Oct 12, 10:01 am, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
>On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
from last night's backup as well.

Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!

Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
field.

-Tom.
>Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?
>If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?
>Thanks!
>magmike- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?
Oct 13 '07 #4
On Oct 12, 9:27 pm, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:55:24 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

INSERT INTO SomeTable ( ID, SomeOtherField )
SELECT [Give ID:] AS Expr1, [Give SomeOtherField:] AS Expr2;

It would have said "Yo! Can't do that. There are related records in
other tables."
Just try it for yourself.

-Tom.
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?
If I had referential integrity setup (i'll need to research that),
what would have happened when I selected Delete Record?
mike
On Oct 12, 10:01 am, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
from last night's backup as well.
Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!
Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
field.
-Tom.
Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?
If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?
Thanks!
magmike- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
How could I change the ID (autonumber) of a current record?
Oct 19 '07 #5
On Oct 12, 9:27 pm, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:55:24 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:

INSERT INTO SomeTable ( ID, SomeOtherField )
SELECT [Give ID:] AS Expr1, [Give SomeOtherField:] AS Expr2;

It would have said "Yo! Can't do that. There are related records in
other tables."
Just try it for yourself.

-Tom.
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?
If I had referential integrity setup (i'll need to research that),
what would have happened when I selected Delete Record?
mike
On Oct 12, 10:01 am, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
from last night's backup as well.
Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!
Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
field.
-Tom.
Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?
If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?
Thanks!
magmike- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
What kind of WHERE statement could I use in the append query, to use a
current record, and change it's autonumber to a different (not already
existing) one?

Oct 19 '07 #6
On Oct 19, 12:18 pm, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.comwrote:
On Oct 12, 9:27 pm, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:


On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 15:55:24 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
wrote:
INSERT INTO SomeTable ( ID, SomeOtherField )
SELECT [Give ID:] AS Expr1, [Give SomeOtherField:] AS Expr2;
It would have said "Yo! Can't do that. There are related records in
other tables."
Just try it for yourself.
-Tom.
>got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?
>If I had referential integrity setup (i'll need to research that),
>what would have happened when I selected Delete Record?
>mike
>On Oct 12, 10:01 am, Tom van Stiphout <no.spam.tom7...@cox.netwrote:
>On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:34:26 -0000, magmike <magmi...@yahoo.com>
>wrote:
>If you haven't done anything else with the db, a data recovery service
>may still be able to get it back for you. Of course you can recover it
>from last night's backup as well.
>Sounds like you violated rule #1 of database design, and did not have
>referential integrity enforcement selected in the table relationships.
>That would have prevented the accidental delete. Fix that!
>Yes, you can create an append query and specify the value of your ID
>field.
>-Tom.
>Accidentally deleted a record. Anyway to get it back?
>If not, I know the ID number - which is an autonumber field. Because
>of the related data from other tables, would I be able to create a new
>record and make its ID number, that of the deleted record?
>Thanks!
>magmike- Hide quoted text -
>- Show quoted text -
>got an example of the append query for changing the ID #?- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

What kind of WHERE statement could I use in the append query, to use a
current record, and change it's autonumber to a different (not already
existing) one?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
If you are using an autonumber field for ANYTHING meaningful in your
data structure you are messing up BIG time. Autonumber is NOT
designed to be a 'record number' or ANY meaningful what so ever. It
is ONLY used as a way to INTERANLLY identify a unique record. You
should NOT use autonumber to be things such as Record Number, PO
Number, Item Number, etc. It sounds like you are doing something of
the sort.

Oct 19 '07 #7
On Oct 21, 1:10 am, "Larry Linson" <boun...@localhost.notwrote:
Also, if you start to create a new
record and cancel it, that number will be "lost and gone forever like
Clementine of song and story"
Khalil Gibran wrote a poem about autonumbers.
I try to keep its theme in mind when working with them:

Your autonumbers are not your autonumbers.
They are the sons and daughters of Data's longing for uniqueness.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you, yet they belong not to you.

Oct 21 '07 #8
"lyle" <ly************@gmail.comwrote
Khalil Gibran wrote a poem about autonumbers.
I try to keep its theme in mind when working with them:

Your autonumbers are not your autonumbers.
They are the sons and daughters of Data's longing for uniqueness.
They come through you but not from you,
And though they are with you, yet they belong not to you.
Very perceptive, that Khalil.
Oct 22 '07 #9
"DavidB" <je***@yahoo.comwrote
EXACTLY the reason that I always use RANDOM
for my autonumebr fields rather than sequential. This
way I am rid of even the appearance that the numbers
'mean' anything.
Appearance to whom? Surely not to the users... the occasion would truly be
a rare one for me to expose an Autonumber field. They are for internal use,
surrogate keys, and linking and none of those functions requires the user to
see them.

It's not neccessarily, always true, but it is a reasonable assumption that
after paying my rate, a client will likely get a competent contractor to
follow me, and a competent Access contractor should know that Autonumber
fields have no intrinsic meaning.

And, I certainly don't need a reminder. My first encounter with a client's
high-tempered-green-eyeshade-and-sleeve-garter accounting/bookkeeping type
over missing numbers in a sequence of AutoNumbers was quite enough to
impress on my memory forever: even if you think the person is knowledgeable
and won't be misled, you can and should avoid showing them Autonumbers.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Oct 23 '07 #10
On Oct 22, 9:09 pm, "Larry Linson" <boun...@localhost.notwrote:
"DavidB" <je...@yahoo.comwrote
EXACTLY the reason that I always use RANDOM
for my autonumebr fields rather than sequential. This
way I am rid of even the appearance that the numbers
'mean' anything.

Appearance to whom? Surely not to the users... the occasion would truly be
a rare one for me to expose an Autonumber field. They are for internal use,
surrogate keys, and linking and none of those functions requires the user to
see them.

It's not neccessarily, always true, but it is a reasonable assumption that
after paying my rate, a client will likely get a competent contractor to
follow me, and a competent Access contractor should know that Autonumber
fields have no intrinsic meaning.

And, I certainly don't need a reminder. My first encounter with a client's
high-tempered-green-eyeshade-and-sleeve-garter accounting/bookkeeping type
over missing numbers in a sequence of AutoNumbers was quite enough to
impress on my memory forever: even if you think the person is knowledgeable
and won't be misled, you can and should avoid showing them Autonumbers.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Agreed that end users should never see the autonumber. Indeed in my
work they never do. Also having been a green visor type in a previou
incarnation (for some reason i did audit work for 9 years), I know all
to well what they infer fro a 'missing' number. It is my normal
practice to assume nothing. So I don't assume that whoever takes over
my databases when I get hit by a bus is at any given level. In
addition since there (IMHO) is no specific benefit in using
incremental or a detriment to using sequential, I opt for the latter.
Probably more a matter of personal choice than anything else.
Oct 23 '07 #11
On Oct 23, 2:00 pm, DavidB <je...@yahoo.comwrote:
On Oct 22, 9:09 pm, "Larry Linson" <boun...@localhost.notwrote:


"DavidB" <je...@yahoo.comwrote
EXACTLY the reason that I always use RANDOM
for my autonumebr fields rather than sequential. This
way I am rid of even the appearance that the numbers
'mean' anything.
Appearance to whom? Surely not to the users... the occasion would truly be
a rare one for me to expose an Autonumber field. They are for internal use,
surrogate keys, and linking and none of those functions requires the user to
see them.
It's not neccessarily, always true, but it is a reasonable assumption that
after paying my rate, a client will likely get a competent contractor to
follow me, and a competent Access contractor should know that Autonumber
fields have no intrinsic meaning.
And, I certainly don't need a reminder. My first encounter with a client's
high-tempered-green-eyeshade-and-sleeve-garter accounting/bookkeeping type
over missing numbers in a sequence of AutoNumbers was quite enough to
impress on my memory forever: even if you think the person is knowledgeable
and won't be misled, you can and should avoid showing them Autonumbers.
Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Agreed that end users should never see the autonumber. Indeed in my
work they never do. Also having been a green visor type in a previou
incarnation (for some reason i did audit work for 9 years), I know all
to well what they infer fro a 'missing' number. It is my normal
practice to assume nothing. So I don't assume that whoever takes over
my databases when I get hit by a bus is at any given level. In
addition since there (IMHO) is no specific benefit in using
incremental or a detriment to using sequential, I opt for the latter.
Probably more a matter of personal choice than anything else.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I have been using auto numbers to create an output file to import into
a relational database. These numbers are used to batch file and create
tickets to pull material. I am still creating the database and was
reading your info and I might have duplicate values. I have created a
table with a number of "00001" and I do an append into the auto number
field of the primary table prior to importing the data and appending
the primary table with some queries which then is exported in the
proper format. I compact the database when it is opened so the numbers
will start over. This will create duplicate values if more than one
file is imported and the database has been closed. Is there a way to
loop the numbers from "00001" thru "1998" or even have a letter at
the begining.
Thanks.
Wayne

Oct 24 '07 #12
On Oct 24, 6:44 am, Wayne <lawayne.loesc...@navy.milwrote:
On Oct 23, 2:00 pm, DavidB <je...@yahoo.comwrote:


On Oct 22, 9:09 pm, "Larry Linson" <boun...@localhost.notwrote:
"DavidB" <je...@yahoo.comwrote
EXACTLY the reason that I always use RANDOM
for my autonumebr fields rather than sequential. This
way I am rid of even the appearance that the numbers
'mean' anything.
Appearance to whom? Surely not to the users... the occasion would truly be
a rare one for me to expose an Autonumber field. They are for internal use,
surrogate keys, and linking and none of those functions requires the user to
see them.
It's not neccessarily, always true, but it is a reasonable assumption that
after paying my rate, a client will likely get a competent contractor to
follow me, and a competent Access contractor should know that Autonumber
fields have no intrinsic meaning.
And, I certainly don't need a reminder. My first encounter with a client's
high-tempered-green-eyeshade-and-sleeve-garter accounting/bookkeeping type
over missing numbers in a sequence of AutoNumbers was quite enough to
impress on my memory forever: even if you think the person is knowledgeable
and won't be misled, you can and should avoid showing them Autonumbers.
Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Agreed that end users should never see the autonumber. Indeed in my
work they never do. Also having been a green visor type in a previou
incarnation (for some reason i did audit work for 9 years), I know all
to well what they infer fro a 'missing' number. It is my normal
practice to assume nothing. So I don't assume that whoever takes over
my databases when I get hit by a bus is at any given level. In
addition since there (IMHO) is no specific benefit in using
incremental or a detriment to using sequential, I opt for the latter.
Probably more a matter of personal choice than anything else.- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -

I have been using auto numbers to create an output file to import into
a relational database. These numbers are used to batch file and create
tickets to pull material. I am still creating the database and was
reading your info and I might have duplicate values. I have created a
table with a number of "00001" and I do an append into the auto number
field of the primary table prior to importing the data and appending
the primary table with some queries which then is exported in the
proper format. I compact the database when it is opened so the numbers
will start over. This will create duplicate values if more than one
file is imported and the database has been closed. Is there a way to
loop the numbers from "00001" thru "1998" or even have a letter at
the begining.
Thanks.
Wayne- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
"00001" is a string not a number.

Oct 26 '07 #13

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