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Linked DB2 table records showing up as #Deleted

P: n/a
I have a DB2 table and when I open it, all the records show up as
#Deleted. I went here: http://www.techonthenet.com/access/t...err_linked.php
and tried this, but I don't get a pop-up box to choose any primary
keys. The kicker is that the table works fine in Crystal Reports.
What is wrong with Access? Why doesn't it work?

Thanks in advance,
Laura

Sep 25 '07 #1
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P: n/a
musicloverlch wrote:
I have a DB2 table and when I open it, all the records show up as
#Deleted. I went here:
http://www.techonthenet.com/access/t...err_linked.php and
tried this, but I don't get a pop-up box to choose any primary
keys. The kicker is that the table works fine in Crystal Reports.
What is wrong with Access? Why doesn't it work?

Thanks in advance,
Laura
You are only prompted to select key fields when creating the link if there
is not already a PK or unique index on the table at the server. If one
exists the link will just use it.

The article that you reference is not exactly correct. The #Deleted is
caused by using a PK that is of a DataType that does not map properly to an
Access/Jet DataType. This can cause rounding between the actual value and
what Access "sees" as the value. Therefore Access loses track of the
records and it appears that they have been deleted.

That article is only relevent in the sense that IF the table had no unique
index or PK and you chose columns yourself when creating the link, you might
inadvertantly choose one or more columns that have this problem. However;
if the table DOES have a PK or unique index that is of the wrong DataType
then Access will use it and you have no choice in the matter.

About all you can do is use a passthrough queries instead for all reading
and updates. Of course if the PK is of a type that Access doesn't work with
well then a query that does updates is something you have to be careful with
as you might update the wrong rows.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com

Sep 25 '07 #2

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