By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
434,824 Members | 2,337 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 434,824 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Creating DB "user accounts" with passwords and restrictions...

100+
P: 135
Hello

Iam about to finish my first DB and i was wondering about security, which is the easiest way of creating "user accounts" with passwords and restrictions????

Thanks
Sep 20 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


ADezii
Expert 5K+
P: 8,636
Hello

Iam about to finish my first DB and i was wondering about security, which is the easiest way of creating "user accounts" with passwords and restrictions????

Thanks
Access Security is both a complex and confusing fellow, be ready for a rough ride. Just a couple of pointers to get you started:
  1. Create User and/or Group Accounts via Tools ==> Security ==> User and Group Accounts.
  2. Create User-Level Security via Tools ==> Security ==> User-Level Security Wizard.
  3. Assign Permissions to Groups not Users, then move Users into these Groups.
  4. Remove all Permissions from the Users Groups and reassign them to a new Group (the Users Group is Global).
  5. Remove the Admin Users from the Admins Group once a new User within Admins has been created (like the Users Group, the Admin User's account is Global).
  6. Do a lot of research/reading before you attempt any of this.
  7. Backup the original Database and Workgroup File (System.mdw), Backup the original Database and Workgroup File (System.mdw), and Backup the original Database and Workgroup File (System.mdw).
Sep 20 '07 #2

NeoPa
Expert Mod 15k+
P: 31,489
Unless you're using Windows 98, Millenium or an earlier (non-NT based) version of Windows, the users name (generally network ID) is available as the environment variable UserName (Environ("UserName")). There are other ways of getting this which are more reliable (after all anyone can change their environment variables if they know how to).

However, I often do security based on this value. The code would have to check it for allowed users (searching through a list of such allowed users is quite simple) before continuing or showing a message explaining the user is not cleared to run the task.

This increases coding overhead (by a little or a bit more depending on how organised your code is) but is a lot more "simple" than using Access security. I've used that, and though it is usable it's a pain for all involved - users and admins.
Sep 20 '07 #3

Post your reply

Sign in to post your reply or Sign up for a free account.