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full screen form

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Hi I'm just starting to build an access database for school project. Iwas wondering if anybody can tell me how to make a form open on full screen, covering all of the taskbar...

much much appriciated... thx :D
Jul 21 '07 #1
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missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
There may be a slicker one of doing it, but I simply make the form Popup and size it to cover the entire screen, which takes a bit of tweeking. The form width needs to be set to 8.375, I think, and then you just have to adjust and test until you get the length correct.Also, opening the form from with the Design View will never place it at the top of the screen. After you think you've got it right you need to open the form by clicking on it in the objects dialog box.

Also, centering the form can be tricky! It's sort of counterintuitive, as you'll see in step one:

1) AutoCenter must be set to No
2) In design view move form to correct position
3) Click on Save
4) Close form without doing anything else!

Once again its sort of trial and error until you get it right! Most of my users are intimidated by the Access interface, which is why I give them a straight Visual Basic looking GUI.

Being in Popup mode, the standard menus aren't available to your users, even using shortcut keys. This suits my purpose perfectly, but may not be for everyone.

Good Luck and Welcome to TheScripts, Gabriela!

Linq ;0)>
Jul 21 '07 #2

100+
P: 675
If your form is named fFORM, then after opening form -
Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1. DoCmd.SelectObject acForm, "fFORM"    'Force fFORMto be current, active object
  2. DoCmd.Maximize
  3.  
OldBirdman
Sep 29 '07 #3

missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
make a form open on full screen, covering all of the taskbar

DoCmd.Maximize
will only maximize the form so that it fills the Access window, OldBirdman! The OP wants it to fill the entire computer screen, menus taskbars and all!

Linq ;0)>
Sep 29 '07 #4

100+
P: 675
OK, I misread the problem. Thank you for pointing that out.

OldBirdman
Sep 29 '07 #5

Jim Doherty
Expert 100+
P: 897
Hi I'm just starting to build an access database for school project. Iwas wondering if anybody can tell me how to make a form open on full screen, covering all of the taskbar...

much much appriciated... thx :D
Make the form as wide as you like wider than the screen longer than the screen and if you set at least these properties of the form the effect will be as you desire a full screen form. You obviously will have to put some mechanism on there to close it in the event of some problem (a transparent close command button or something.)

min max buttons none
Borderstyle none
popup yes
navigation buttons no
Recordselectors no
scrollbars neither

then in the on load event enter the code

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1.  DoCmd.Maximize
Sep 29 '07 #6

missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
As I said in Post # 4 , DoCmd.Maximize only causes the form to maximize to fill the Access window. If the form has been sized correctly, it will cover the entire screen, menus, taskbar and all without this. In fact, if this has been done, adding the DoCmd.Maximize command will sometimes (in ACC2000 and ACC2003) cause only half of the form to appear. Never have figured out why that happens.

Linq ;0)>
Sep 30 '07 #7

Jim Doherty
Expert 100+
P: 897
As I said in Post # 4 , DoCmd.Maximize only causes the form to maximize to fill the Access window. If the form has been sized correctly, it will cover the entire screen, menus, taskbar and all without this. In fact, if this has been done, adding the DoCmd.Maximize command will sometimes (in ACC2000 and ACC2003) cause only half of the form to appear. Never have figured out why that happens.

Linq ;0)>
Hi Ling :)

Its interesting I tried to post the metadata for a form I have here that shows a 1 inch width by one inch tall form with a simple close button on it intention being that you could then load it in to a db to look at using application.LoadFromText the idea being to show that without the Docmd.maximize command it opens centre screen and small without borders. (obviously because its popup and autocenter) If you then add the docmd.maximize command because the various form properties option have been set ie: borderless and so on the form opens up to fill the entire screen not just the access window 'irrespective' of the actual size dimensions of the form. In other words the form can be as big or small as you like.

Needless to say the posted metadata data for the form didnt work on preview when I copied it back out of the html page to make sure that you could be able to reconstitute it your end (using the LoadFromText method) using either 'notepad' or 'write' so obviously some formats relied on in the rebuild text are being lost oh well it was worth a try

Jim :)
Oct 1 '07 #8

missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
It's always worth a try, especially where Access is concerned! Of all the environments I've used to develop apps, Access/VBA has got to be the least/worst documented. Part of this is due, I think, to the fact that about 75-85% of VBA was not written from scratch, so to speak, but rather was "snitched" from QuickBasic 4.5! I think a lot of the things simply never made it into the Help files. Another part is that Access is simply so incredibly big and complicated! I've been dancing this dance for over ten years and find out something new about it almost weekly. The bottom line is you really can't depend on Access Help; you almost have to try out everything for yourself!

Linq ;0)>
Oct 1 '07 #9

Jim Doherty
Expert 100+
P: 897
It's always worth a try, especially where Access is concerned! Of all the environments I've used to develop apps, Access/VBA has got to be the least/worst documented. Part of this is due, I think, to the fact that about 75-85% of VBA was not written from scratch, so to speak, but rather was "snitched" from QuickBasic 4.5! I think a lot of the things simply never made it into the Help files. Another part is that Access is simply so incredibly big and complicated! I've been dancing this dance for over ten years and find out something new about it almost weekly. The bottom line is you really can't depend on Access Help; you almost have to try out everything for yourself!

Linq ;0)>

Haha I'm glad you feel the same way

Jim :)
Oct 1 '07 #10

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