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Very NEWBIE question:-)

P: 3
This is so basic and I am so uneducated in Access, but I have a program and I am trying to type in a number that may have one, two or three digits after the decimal point. I changed it from a number field to a text field thinking that would help, but it doesn't. I can't have it fill in with 0s because that changes my diagnosis code if you have additional numbers that are not really there. Can someone help with very simple instructions. I know it's not difficult, I'm just not sure how to do it....Thanks, Robin
Jul 16 '07 #1
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8 Replies


P: 49
We all started somewhere !

If I'm getting this right (and I hope I am) you need to have the text box formatted as a NUMBER

Then you want to be able to type in .123 rather than 0.123?

If this is the case I don't think Access will allow it as it has to have a preceed the point with something to have a the correct format.

even if you format the record in the table properties to DECIMAL and the scale as ZERO it will still put the pre point zero in for you

why is not haveing the points preceeding zero important?

Gareth
Jul 16 '07 #2

P: 3
We all started somewhere !

If I'm getting this right (and I hope I am) you need to have the text box formatted as a NUMBER

Then you want to be able to type in .123 rather than 0.123?

If this is the case I don't think Access will allow it as it has to have a preceed the point with something to have a the correct format.

even if you format the record in the table properties to DECIMAL and the scale as ZERO it will still put the pre point zero in for you

why is not haveing the points preceeding zero important?

Gareth
Actually what I need is a 0 following the decimal point. Some codes are 236.30 others are 236.3 but they mean different things. So, I need the option to have the 0 showing if I type it in. Does that clarify things??? Thanks, Robin
Jul 19 '07 #3

P: 48
i'm somewhat new myself, but you might wanna try changing the data type to a DOUBLE and set the number of decimal places. Also, if you're working in currency, i believe their is a data mask for that specifically.
Jul 19 '07 #4

P: 24
in this case it depends...

changing it to a texxt box can help if ure typing everything in yourself. If so then i believe a text box would be more beneficial then any numerical field you would have in there since with a text field it reads it as is; however, with a numerical field 1.23 is the same as 1.2300000000. so how exactly are you using this data?
Jul 19 '07 #5

P: 1
On the format of the tex box use &
That will allow any character including numbers.
Jul 19 '07 #6

missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
I am trying to type in a number that may have one, two or three digits after the decimal point. I changed it from a number field to a text field thinking that would help, but it doesn't.
You say that changing the datatype to text "doesn't" help, but you've never actually said what kind of problem you're having to begin with! If these are ICD-9 codes, or something similar, there's no reason for them to be defined as numeric data. While they're composed of digits and "decimals" they will never be used in mathematical calculations. Defining them as text allows you to have the trailing zeros you need without Access lopping them off!

Welcome to TheScripts

Linq ;0)>
Jul 20 '07 #7

P: 3
I will try again to identify them as text but when I tried that it still dropped the trailing 0 I needed. Yes, some of these are ICD-9 codes for diagnoses so the additional digits after the decimal including 0 is essential.

I appreciate all the responses and will try again. Thanks for your help!!

You say that changing the datatype to text "doesn't" help, but you've never actually said what kind of problem you're having to begin with! If these are ICD-9 codes, or something similar, there's no reason for them to be defined as numeric data. While they're composed of digits and "decimals" they will never be used in mathematical calculations. Defining them as text allows you to have the trailing zeros you need without Access lopping them off!

Welcome to TheScripts

Linq ;0)>
Jul 25 '07 #8

missinglinq
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,532
You need to recheck the relevant fields in the table for datatype. If the field is defined as text it makes no sense for any characters, zeros or otherwise, to be "dropped!" Trailing zeros are only dropped when they are the "decimal" part of a numeric datatype!

Linq ;0)>
Jul 25 '07 #9

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