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Sharepoint

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What is Sharepoint, and should I care?
Jul 13 '07 #1
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20 Replies


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On Jul 13, 10:35 am, "Neil" <nos...@nospam.netwrote:
What is Sharepoint, and should I care?
It's a web delivered collaboration tool with forum, blogs, wiki, etc
functionalities.

Jul 13 '07 #2

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"Max Vit" <mv**@safe-mail.netwrote
<nos...@nospam.netwrote:
>What is Sharepoint, and should I care?

It's a web delivered collaboration tool with
forum, blogs, wiki, etc functionalities.
And, the answer to the second question is "Probably not, unless you are a
moderately-large or greater-sized organization."

One problem SharePoint has faced is that most such organizations already had
adopted standards for collaboration tools. It's much more an uphill battle
if you have to replace entrenched software than just sell the client on the
need for a new function.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Jul 13 '07 #3

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Thanks to both of you for your replies. The reason I ask is because whenever
I read about A07, it's like, "Sharepoint this," "Sharepoint that." I'm
waiting for a client to say, "We want to integrate this with Sharepoint,"
and I'd be, like, "What the F is Sharepoint?"

So, should I worry about this from a career perspective?

Thx.
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.notwrote in message
news:SeDli.41646$sq4.36733@trnddc05...
"Max Vit" <mv**@safe-mail.netwrote
<nos...@nospam.netwrote:
What is Sharepoint, and should I care?
It's a web delivered collaboration tool with
forum, blogs, wiki, etc functionalities.

And, the answer to the second question is "Probably not, unless you are a
moderately-large or greater-sized organization."

One problem SharePoint has faced is that most such organizations already
had adopted standards for collaboration tools. It's much more an uphill
battle if you have to replace entrenched software than just sell the
client on the need for a new function.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Jul 13 '07 #4

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"Neil" <no****@nospam.netwrote in
news:8G*******************@newssvr12.news.prodigy. net:
So, should I worry about this from a career perspective?
I'm not worrying about it myself.

But I didn't worry about ADO either.

Er, uh, well, that worked out, how, exactly?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jul 13 '07 #5

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"Neil" <no****@nospam.netwrote
Thanks to both of you for your replies. The reason I ask is because
whenever
I read about A07, it's like, "Sharepoint this," "Sharepoint that." I'm
waiting for a client to say, "We want to integrate this with Sharepoint,"
and I'd be, like, "What the F is Sharepoint?"
It is true that, in the newly-current release, Microsoft has enhanced
Sharepoint, and is promoting using its collaboration features with Microsoft
Office. So, you will definitely keep hearing about it, particularly from
Microsoft.
So, should I worry about this from a career perspective?
That would depend on who your career is with... if you work for, or contract
to, an organization that depends heavily on Microsoft Office, and has
implemented Sharepoint, then, yes, it is important. If you work for, or
contract to, an organization that doesn't so heavily depend oon Microsoft
Office, and has not implemented Sharepoint, especially if they have a
history with other collaboration tools, it's only important that you know
what it is and can discuss it intelligently (all of which you can get from
reading about it).

If the possibility is clear, and the probability more than "low" that you
_will_ work for or contract to, an organization that will want Sharepoint,
then it's worth investing some time and effort. You will need a Server... or
will need to run virtual PC software that runs concurrently with your
workstation OS, if you are to get actual experince with it.

It's of interest to me, not because I have clients who've implemented it,
but because I may get the call you describe. Fortunately, my user group has
implemented Sharepoint for some functions (not exactly the ones Microsoft
had in mind) and are about to upgrade to the most recent versions, so, by
volunteering, I'll be able to get at least enough experience to do more than
talk about Sharepoing.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP


Jul 13 '07 #6

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"David W. Fenton" <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalidwrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@127.0.0. 1...
"Neil" <no****@nospam.netwrote in
news:8G*******************@newssvr12.news.prodigy. net:
>So, should I worry about this from a career perspective?

I'm not worrying about it myself.

But I didn't worry about ADO either.

Er, uh, well, that worked out, how, exactly?
That was a good call. I didn't go with ADO for a different reason: I tend to
put off new technologies until they mature, if at all possible. With ADO,
that just never happened. (Uh oh! Here come the ADO defenders!!)

Neil
>
--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

Jul 13 '07 #7

P: n/a
Thanks, Larry. Since, as you note, it just depends on the client, and it
doesn't look like the world is going to Sharepoint, I won't worry about it
just yet. If I do, then I guess I'll swing by your user group. :-)

Neil
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.notwrote in message
news:J2Tli.153$LH5.0@trnddc02...
"Neil" <no****@nospam.netwrote
Thanks to both of you for your replies. The reason I ask is because
whenever
I read about A07, it's like, "Sharepoint this," "Sharepoint that." I'm
waiting for a client to say, "We want to integrate this with
Sharepoint,"
and I'd be, like, "What the F is Sharepoint?"

It is true that, in the newly-current release, Microsoft has enhanced
Sharepoint, and is promoting using its collaboration features with
Microsoft Office. So, you will definitely keep hearing about it,
particularly from Microsoft.
>So, should I worry about this from a career perspective?

That would depend on who your career is with... if you work for, or
contract to, an organization that depends heavily on Microsoft Office, and
has implemented Sharepoint, then, yes, it is important. If you work for,
or contract to, an organization that doesn't so heavily depend oon
Microsoft Office, and has not implemented Sharepoint, especially if they
have a history with other collaboration tools, it's only important that
you know what it is and can discuss it intelligently (all of which you can
get from reading about it).

If the possibility is clear, and the probability more than "low" that you
_will_ work for or contract to, an organization that will want Sharepoint,
then it's worth investing some time and effort. You will need a Server...
or will need to run virtual PC software that runs concurrently with your
workstation OS, if you are to get actual experince with it.

It's of interest to me, not because I have clients who've implemented it,
but because I may get the call you describe. Fortunately, my user group
has implemented Sharepoint for some functions (not exactly the ones
Microsoft had in mind) and are about to upgrade to the most recent
versions, so, by volunteering, I'll be able to get at least enough
experience to do more than talk about Sharepoing.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP


Jul 13 '07 #8

P: n/a
On Jul 13, 6:31 pm, "Larry Linson" <boun...@localhost.notwrote:
volunteering, I'll be able to get at least enough experience to do more than
talk about Sharepoing.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
I'll call it "shar-pei" if it dogs :-).

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com
Jul 13 '07 #9

P: n/a
Neil wrote:
What is Sharepoint, and should I care?
Perhaps of interest is the related Microsoft Groove (fwiw). Here's more
info if interested:

http://www.microsoft.com/midsizebusi...ue/groove.mspx

--
'--------------------------
' John Mishefske
' UtterAccess Editor
' 2007 Microsoft Access MVP
'--------------------------
Jul 15 '07 #10

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Max Vit <mv**@safe-mail.netwrote:
>It's a web delivered collaboration tool with forum, blogs, wiki, etc
functionalities.
In one situation I was using the forum software. It sucked brutally as it doesn't
remember the postings you've read. So you have no way of seeing only the new
postings since you last logged in.

DOS based BBS software I used with a 2400 bps modem in 1989 did a better job in this
area.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Jul 16 '07 #11

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"Tony Toews [MVP]" <tt****@telusplanet.netwrote in
news:mb********************************@4ax.com:
Max Vit <mv**@safe-mail.netwrote:
>>It's a web delivered collaboration tool with forum, blogs, wiki,
etc functionalities.

In one situation I was using the forum software. It sucked
brutally as it doesn't remember the postings you've read. So you
have no way of seeing only the new postings since you last logged
in.

DOS based BBS software I used with a 2400 bps modem in 1989 did a
better job in this area.
A client of mine insists all our discussions take place in
Sharepoint forums and it's a royal pain.

Color me unimpressed, but it's really only a version 2 product for
Microsoft, so maybe the next iteration will be great, as so many
version 3 releases of MS products are.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jul 16 '07 #12

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On Jul 12, 8:35 pm, "Neil" <nos...@nospam.netwrote:
What is Sharepoint, and should I care?
Here are my initial impressions about SharePoint:

I completed viewing all the PDC 05 files except for the ones on
Microsoft Presentation Foundation (which I will view later) and one
symposium (I'm in the middle of it). A significant number of the
Office 2007 presentations were devoted either to SharePoint or to
services available through SharePoint. BTW, I'm amazed as an Access
programmer at what I didn't know about Microsoft's plans for the
future. It is clear that Microsoft has big plans for SharePoint.

SharePoint comes on the scene at a time when, for example, many
companies are trying to cut down on software expenses such as server
licenses by going to open source. Companies are demanding increasing
value for their dollar, yet another Microsoft server is attempting to
buck the current trend so that they can move software revenue higher.
How is it going to do that? SharePoint has a lot of sales "hooks."
By that I mean that Microsoft is positioning SharePoint in a way that
it is Microsoft's only solution for a number of common business
problems. Do you want snapshot backups of data? Do you want to use
Workflow without having to use Visual Studio? Do you want InfoPath to
provide easy DAP-like forms? Do you want easy security? There are
other hooks also. The convenience of SharePoint provides such value
hooks to buck the trend. While SharePoint seems to be getting out of
the gate slowly, over time those hooks will catch enough business to
make the development more than worthwhile. The vision seems almost
like putting Office on the web and saying, "now look at what you can
do with Office."

Microsoft's success has been largely about convenience. SharePoint is
no exception, but the constant stream of naive businesses willing to
close their eyes and say, "Just let Microsoft do it all!" is showing
signs of change. Yet with the time commitment required for developers
to keep abreast of Microsoft's "new" technologies along with those
from other vendors, we have to find our own equilibrium point between
in-house development and prepackaged convenience. This is where I'm
really pleased with what Microsoft has done. By adopting standards
they have created many ways to integrate with their ideas at many
points between those extremes. By providing many extension points for
the software they make it possible to do a little or a lot on your
own. Right now, SharePoint is a little too prepackaged for my tastes
but I am constantly looking at various software products for ways to
find the right balance for where I am right now.

Ignoring something that Microsoft is spending a lot of time and effort
on is not a good idea. I'll watch closely how SharePoint does and try
to be ready in case a company wants to go with SharePoint or even
Visual Studio. The presentations made Windows development look a lot
more fun than developing in Access, but maybe it's just greener-
looking grass. In any event (no pun intended), I think the risk I'm
taking by expanding into other technologies will make me a more well-
rounded Access developer.

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com

Jul 17 '07 #13

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CD********@FortuneJames.com wrote in
news:11**********************@g4g2000hsf.googlegro ups.com:
Ignoring something that Microsoft is spending a lot of time and
effort on is not a good idea.
I have looked at the materials on this subject trying for the life
of me to figure out how Sharepoint could ever fit into any of my
clients' operations (I'm not even including the small businesses
that don't have a server), and I just don't see it.

I believe in a software ecosystem with variety, and I just don't see
Sharepoint as relevant. The only place it *is* is in things like
Access 2007 where it's the new method for replacing Jet replication.
That's a completely artificial decision on MS's part (and a poorly
implemented one), and serves only to make me think that Sharepoint
is not good enough on its own to get market share without
intentionally removing functionality offered in other products and
replacing it with Sharepoint-provided solutions.

At least, that's the way I see it as a consultant for small
businesses and individuals.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jul 17 '07 #14

P: n/a
On Jul 17, 7:18 am, "David W. Fenton" <XXXuse...@dfenton.com.invalid>
wrote:
CDMAPos...@FortuneJames.com wrote innews:11**********************@g4g2000hsf.googleg roups.com:
Ignoring something that Microsoft is spending a lot of time and
effort on is not a good idea.

I have looked at the materials on this subject trying for the life
of me to figure out how Sharepoint could ever fit into any of my
clients' operations (I'm not even including the small businesses
that don't have a server), and I just don't see it.

I believe in a software ecosystem with variety, and I just don't see
Sharepoint as relevant. The only place it *is* is in things like
Access 2007 where it's the new method for replacing Jet replication.
That's a completely artificial decision on MS's part (and a poorly
implemented one), and serves only to make me think that Sharepoint
is not good enough on its own to get market share without
intentionally removing functionality offered in other products and
replacing it with Sharepoint-provided solutions.

At least, that's the way I see it as a consultant for small
businesses and individuals.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
David,

I agree with your comments but I still stand by my comment.

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com

Jul 17 '07 #15

P: n/a
On Jul 17, 7:18 am, "David W. Fenton" <XXXuse...@dfenton.com.invalid>
wrote:
CDMAPos...@FortuneJames.com wrote innews:11**********************@g4g2000hsf.googleg roups.com:
Ignoring something that Microsoft is spending a lot of time and
effort on is not a good idea.

I have looked at the materials on this subject trying for the life
of me to figure out how Sharepoint could ever fit into any of my
clients' operations (I'm not even including the small businesses
that don't have a server), and I just don't see it.

I believe in a software ecosystem with variety, and I just don't see
Sharepoint as relevant. The only place it *is* is in things like
Access 2007 where it's the new method for replacing Jet replication.
That's a completely artificial decision on MS's part (and a poorly
implemented one), and serves only to make me think that Sharepoint
is not good enough on its own to get market share without
intentionally removing functionality offered in other products and
replacing it with Sharepoint-provided solutions.

At least, that's the way I see it as a consultant for small
businesses and individuals.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
I don't see my post from several hours ago so I'm trying again. I
agree with your comments but still stand by my comment.

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com

Jul 18 '07 #16

P: n/a
I use Access 2007 linked to SharePoint v3 to access the same data from
home and work.

It's so easy can see a whole new wave of access applications for me to
fix in the next few years!

Regards,
Tom Bizannes
Microsoft Access Specialist
Sydney, Australia

Jul 19 '07 #17

P: n/a
SmartbizAustralia <to*@smartbiz.com.auwrote in
news:11**********************@x35g2000prf.googlegr oups.com:
I use Access 2007 linked to SharePoint v3 to access the same data
from home and work.

It's so easy can see a whole new wave of access applications for
me to fix in the next few years!
You never used replication?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jul 19 '07 #18

P: n/a
SmartbizAustralia <to*@smartbiz.com.auwrote:
>I use Access 2007 linked to SharePoint v3 to access the same data from
home and work.

It's so easy can see a whole new wave of access applications for me to
fix in the next few years!
Trouble is Sharepoint is missing such basic functionality as relational integrity.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Jul 19 '07 #19

P: n/a
On Jul 19, 8:24 am, SmartbizAustralia <t...@smartbiz.com.auwrote:
I use Access 2007 linked to SharePoint v3 to access the same data from
home and work.

It's so easy can see a whole new wave of access applications for me to
fix in the next few years!

Regards,
Tom Bizannes
Microsoft Access Specialist
Sydney, Australia
Sharing data is yet another hook. Regardless of the quality of
software implementation, Microsoft does a great job at determining
what customers want. I don't necessarily want to leverage SharePoint
software yet, but I do want to leverage all that outstanding market
research. Rich data, rich controls, rich this, rich that -- I want to
use it to make me rich! Many of SharePoint's hooks were a direct
result of marketing research. There are millions of programmers (a
television program recently stated that roughly a third of U.S. tax
returns state an occupation of "programmer") out there who do not have
sufficient skills to set up a database, normalize schemata or even set
up tables with a many-to-many relationship. SharePoint will become a
way to allow them to wallow in blissful ignorance. Yet SharePoint may
still be able to provide value for the technologically savvy
programmer by allowing her to concentrate on getting things done more
quickly at a higher level. For the rest, I agree that failed
SharePoint implementations will provide lots of new opportunities for
Access programmers and others who understand the limitations of the
short cuts.

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com

Jul 19 '07 #20

P: n/a
On Jul 20, 4:28 am, "David W. Fenton" <XXXuse...@dfenton.com.invalid>
wrote:
SmartbizAustralia <t...@smartbiz.com.auwrote innews:11**********************@x35g2000prf.google groups.com:
I use Access 2007 linked to SharePoint v3 to access the same data
from home and work.
It's so easy can see a whole new wave of access applications for
me to fix in the next few years!

You never used replication?

? Depends on the business requirement.

Say you have a web form that fills in requests from the internet, then
you can have an asp.net form that fills in your SharePoint list.

MsAccess is then used to do quick updates, reporting etc. So
replication can be nice except when you want the latest data all the
time.

The concept of offline is now becoming a dirty word, with switched on
all the time ability becoming the norm.

Since SharePoint doesn't have relational integrity, you are better off
exposing only some data as sharepoint lists, and the business units
love being able to update items without expensive applications or many
business requests.

One example was a bank who can update their branch details via a list.

As most will agree, it depends on the flexibility and business
requirements as to what technology or combination thereof you use.

Tom Bizannes
Microsoft Access Developer
Sydney, Australia

Jul 22 '07 #21

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