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GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)


Gabor wrote:
>
On Jun 22, 9:15 am, MrB...@gmail.com wrote:
>Me and my buddy made a website called [deleted].com, its
basically a free forum and free blog driven web site dedicated as a
source people can goto to find out how to clean and remove stains from
pretty much anything. Problem is, as of yet, you couldn't find out how
to clean anything right now cause the site is new and no one has found
it yet.

We don't know enough about cleaning and tips and tricks to really fill
the site. Were looking to get more useful content so that the website
eventually shows up in search results.

If anyone here is interested, visitwww.CleaningTips.com/forum.html,
and if there is anything you could add to the site please feel free to
do so. Email me at [deleted]@gmail.com if you find anything that
could improve the site or if something doesn't seem to be working
properly.

How about...
How to clean your keyboard

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=11029793
----------------------------------------------------------------

GMCFESIL: (Guy Macon's Cure For Electronics Soaked In Liquids)
(Feel free to repost, but please include this reference
to my webpage at [ http://www.guymacon.com/ ].)
[1] Remove all power sources. Unplug the device and
remove all batteries, including soldered in batteries
if you can.
[2] Disassemble the device as well as your skills allow.
If there is a paper cone speaker or other part that
looks like it might be damaged by water, set it aside.
[3] Go outside with a garden hose or put it in the sink
and flush it with clean water to try to remove any
soap, coffee, urine, or whatever else you managed to
get in there.
[4] Use a 1/2 gallon jug of distilled water (make sure it's
the distilled kind) and flush out the normal water.
[5] Use a bottle or two of isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol to
flush the distilled water out. For antique devices
that may have natural rubber in them, use pure drinking
alcohol. In either case, the higher the proof/percentage
the better.
[6] Put it in a warm, dry place until you can't smell any
alcohol. Then leave it for at least another day before
reassembling and testing.
[7] If you are in a hurry, you can try to accelerate step
six with a fan, blow drier, etc. It's up to you to
insure that you don't start an alcohol fire.
Guy Macon
http://www.guymacon.com/
-------------------------------------------------------------

Jun 22 '07 #1
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