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New to relational databases

P: n/a
Hello,

I'm new to relational DBs and I'm trying to learn. Just curious if
anyone has any suggestions on what I should be reading or taking a
class in first? Essentially, I'm looking to utilize Access to set up
a work management system.

Any suggestions are appreciated.

Thanks,

Ian

Jun 7 '07 #1
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P: n/a
Hi, Ian.
I'm new to relational DBs and I'm trying to learn. Just curious if
anyone has any suggestions on what I should be reading or taking a
class in first?
Microsoft MVP Tom Wickerath has a few links he always recommends for
beginners. One of the links to former Access MVP Jeff Conrad's Access
Junkie lists has been moved to another Web site. Please see the following
Web pages for resources:

http://www.accessmvp.com/JConrad/acc...abaseDesign101

http://groups.google.com/group/micro...1b19428ac92d0c

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
Blogs: www.DataDevilDog.BlogSpot.com, www.DatabaseTips.BlogSpot.com
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
Jun 7 '07 #2

P: n/a
I would also recommend Dev Ashish's 'The Access Web' (http://mvps.org/
access/) as this contains lots of different code samples that will
give you a very good idea about the capabilities of Access.

As a rule of thumb, your application (if developed completely in
Access) should not have a size bigger than 2GB and should have
(depending on various factors) no more than 25 concurrent users.

I have found Access to be the *best* entry point to learn the
fundamentals (and more!) of relational databases so your starting
point is a solid one.

Good luck!

Jun 7 '07 #3

P: n/a
boston_dude wrote:
class in first? Essentially, I'm looking to utilize Access to set up
a work management system.
Ian
Hi Ian,

As someone who has written and worked with various work management
systems since 1bout 1991, I'd strongly recommend you get a very strong
backing in database theory and some practice before you embark on as
involved a project as this. You might have a simple concept at first,
but work management systems eventually and inevitably, because of user
requirements, spread out to all sorts of things, such as equipment and
vehicle management, fixed assets, parts inventories, scheduled
work/maintenace and a host of other things.
--
Tim http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Be Careful, Big Bird!" - Ditto "TIM-MAY!!" - Me
Jun 7 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Jun 7, 11:29 am, Tim Marshall
<TIM...@PurplePandaChasers.Moertheriumwrote:
boston_dude wrote:
class in first? Essentially, I'm looking to utilize Access to set up
a work management system.
Ian

Hi Ian,

As someone who has written and worked with various work management
systems since 1bout 1991, I'd strongly recommend you get a very strong
backing in database theory and some practice before you embark on as
involved a project as this. You might have a simple concept at first,
but work management systems eventually and inevitably, because of user
requirements, spread out to all sorts of things, such as equipment and
vehicle management, fixed assets, parts inventories, scheduled
work/maintenace and a host of other things.
--
Tim http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Be Careful, Big Bird!" - Ditto "TIM-MAY!!" - Me


Everyone,

Thanks a million for the advice. I'll start taking a look at the
sites and get back to you with any questions that I have.

Cheers!

Ian

Jun 7 '07 #5

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