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Office 2000 / Office 2007 compatibility question

P: n/a
I currently have a handful of Access 2000 tools I've written for my office.
Here in the next few weeks, the office is getting upgraded to Office 2007.

My question is, does anybody know how much trouble my Access 2000 tools are
going to have running on Access 2007? Am I going to have to rewrite all my
code (or half, or 1/3 of my code) or rebuild the tools again in Access 2007
as happy little .acdb databases (or whatever that new extension is) ?

Any info you might be able to share on this would be appreciated.

--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com

May 31 '07 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
Access 2007 can run an MDB created in 2000, 2002 or 2003, as well as its own
new format (ACCDB.)

So, if your utilities use standard approaches and don't rely on external
libraries that are version specific, they will execute under A2007 without
change.

More info about the issues you could face in:
Converting to Access 2007
at:
http://allenbrowne.com/Access2007.html

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"bkdraper via AccessMonster.com" <u7849@uwewrote in message
news:73058c1e74bc6@uwe...
>I currently have a handful of Access 2000 tools I've written for my office.
Here in the next few weeks, the office is getting upgraded to Office 2007.

My question is, does anybody know how much trouble my Access 2000 tools
are
going to have running on Access 2007? Am I going to have to rewrite all
my
code (or half, or 1/3 of my code) or rebuild the tools again in Access
2007
as happy little .acdb databases (or whatever that new extension is) ?

Any info you might be able to share on this would be appreciated.
Jun 1 '07 #2

P: n/a
Thank you very much for that info Allen, it was both informative and a relief
to know I won't need to rebuild my tools because they're all standard code
with no uncommon libraries.

My tools are chalked full of Active-x controls because I loves me a good tree-
view and list-view control. I use them so often, it'd almost be considered
abusing it, but I can't imagine them having any trouble with 2007 unless 2007
doesn't like the version 6 controls.

I beta tested 2007 for about 6 months a while back but gave up on it because
it was too buggy, but it looks like, according to that article you linked to,
that alot of thats been fixed.

I do remember one conclusion I drew about 2007 that became predominately
clear....I hate the ribbon!
Call me old-fashioned, but the worst thing about Microsoft reinventing the
wheel is that I have to relearn the wheel.

Any, thanks again for your reply. It was most useful.

P.S. one more question, I didn't notice any comments in your article
regarding SQL so I was wondering if you knew whether or not Access SQL got an
upgrade in 2007 as well? I can recall some frustrating nights trying to
recreate some standard SQL queries in Access because Access doesn't support
some kinds of complex joins, nor is it able to display non-standard joins in
the query designer. Plus I always thought stored procedures would be kinda
nice in Access.

--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com

Jun 1 '07 #3

P: n/a
The query designer in A2007 is very similar to previous versions.

There's a few visual differences (e.g. the Properties pane, and the wider
Parameters dialog), but beneath the surface it works the same as previous
versions.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"bkdraper via AccessMonster.com" <u7849@uwewrote in message
news:73081054aa195@uwe...
Thank you very much for that info Allen, it was both informative and a
relief
to know I won't need to rebuild my tools because they're all standard code
with no uncommon libraries.

My tools are chalked full of Active-x controls because I loves me a good
tree-
view and list-view control. I use them so often, it'd almost be considered
abusing it, but I can't imagine them having any trouble with 2007 unless
2007
doesn't like the version 6 controls.

I beta tested 2007 for about 6 months a while back but gave up on it
because
it was too buggy, but it looks like, according to that article you linked
to,
that alot of thats been fixed.

I do remember one conclusion I drew about 2007 that became predominately
clear....I hate the ribbon!
Call me old-fashioned, but the worst thing about Microsoft reinventing the
wheel is that I have to relearn the wheel.

Any, thanks again for your reply. It was most useful.

P.S. one more question, I didn't notice any comments in your article
regarding SQL so I was wondering if you knew whether or not Access SQL got
an
upgrade in 2007 as well? I can recall some frustrating nights trying to
recreate some standard SQL queries in Access because Access doesn't
support
some kinds of complex joins, nor is it able to display non-standard joins
in
the query designer. Plus I always thought stored procedures would be
kinda
nice in Access.
Jun 1 '07 #4

P: n/a
"bkdraper via AccessMonster.com" <u7849@uwewrote in
news:73081054aa195@uwe:
I always thought stored procedures would be kinda
nice in Access.
How could that possibly work, given that there's no server-side
processing? If you're expecting stored procedures, you're also
expecting triggers and transaction logging.

Not gonna happen.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 1 '07 #5

P: n/a
I always imagined that if they really wanted to, some level of stored-
procedure-like functionality could be built into the jet engine. If SQL
express can do it, being a file-based db, then it wouldn't be impossible for
Access to do either. At least to some degree.

--
Kelly D

Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com

Jun 1 '07 #6

P: n/a
"bkdraper via AccessMonster.com" <u7849@uwewrote in
news:7310936512c86@uwe:
I always imagined that if they really wanted to, some level of
stored- procedure-like functionality could be built into the jet
engine. If SQL express can do it, being a file-based db, then it
wouldn't be impossible for Access to do either. At least to some
degree.
I don't see how it could be done. I know nothing about SQL Express.
The only way I can think of that this could work is if there were a
process running on the other machine that executed the stored
procedure there. Otherwise, this kind of "stored procedure" is on
different from just writing VBA code that does the same thing.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 2 '07 #7

P: n/a
Well, fair enough.

Just like the wise old owl says in those old tootsie-pop commercials, "...the
world may never know."

Thanks for the debate David. Perhaps we'll do it again sometime on another
topic.

--
Kelly D

Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200706/1

Jun 3 '07 #8

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