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Design theory going from Access 97 to 2007

P: n/a
ARC
Ok, so I'm looking at Access 2007, and I have imported my existing Access 97
application. I'm feeling a bit overwelmed in what to do here. In my original
97 application, I had one form: Mainmenu, which contained a header area /
customer selection area, and a subform. I had a custom toolbar that had a
button for each major screen. So clicking Customers would load the customers
form into the subform of the mainmenu. By choosing a customer in the header
area, it would then load the info into the subform.

I designed the system to follow along with the customer. So if you had
selected a customer in the header area of Mainmenu, then clicked the
"Invoices" screen button, the Invoice form would load into the subform of
mainmenu and you would see the history of all invoices created for the
current customer.

Here's a screen picture so you can see what I mean:
http://www.pcesoft.com/newres.html

Now, in 2007, I'm having ideas, but am still feeling lost as what to do. My
first thought was to abandon the mainmenu / submenu concept, and somehow
build a ribbon with the customer selection (header area of main screen), and
build a ribbon with a button for each screen name to replace the toolbar.

I've tried creating a sample ribbon, and as yet, cannot even get it to show,
even if I go under options for current database and select the ribbon. If I
set it to be the ribbon of the mainmenu form, it will show for a minute, but
then will be replaced by the default access ribbon.

Design-wise, and looking at the screenshot, I am just lost on how to
re-design such a complex screen to make it easier for the user!! Yikes...

I realize this is a lot to read, but would definetely appreciate the help of
a 2007 Access pro. Feeling a bit lost with 2007. I know I can't continue to
use the main design I have in the screenshot, and need to refresh the look
with ribbons, etc. But, wow, what a task this will be!

Thanks!

Andy
May 24 '07 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Hi Andy,

Your form looks fairly sophisticated, but you did not mention what you
are using for the backend. I will assume it is an Access backend (as
opposed to sql Server).

Access 2007 is different enough from Access97 (still not OOP though),
that to migrate to Acc2007 won't happen in 5 minutes (depending on how
much code you have behind that form - I will guess a lot - been there).

You probably can't just import all the object from the Acc97 to Acc2007
db. So I could create your form(s) and copy the controls and get the
form(s) going. Then just copy and paste the code from the code modules.
When the debugger starts complaining, that is when you can post what
each bug/complaint is and take it from there.

Just a suggestion here, but as long as you are migrating to a newer
technology, for an app as sophisticated as the one on your site - I
would go with VB.Net2005. It is OOP, but once you get the hang of OOP
you will find that the coding required will be reduced by almost 50% -
no kidding. Much more scalable, flexible, and doesn't have the
limitations of Access if you happen to step your backend up to Sql
Server (or Oracle). VB2005 might be overkill for a simple application,
but for complex ones - it makes them much simpler to mange than Access.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
May 24 '07 #2

P: n/a
ARC
Yes, the back-end is access 97. It is an interesting thought to move to
another development system. The only problem is, financially, I'm under a
time crunch to get out a version 6, that I can charge for.

The app did migrate over to 2007 without troubles. It put all my custom
toolbars and menu's under add-ins. I'm just trying to figure a way to
re-design the interface so it's not so overwelming to new users.

Thanks for your reply!

"Rich P" <rp*****@aol.comwrote in message
news:46*********************@news.qwest.net...
Hi Andy,

Your form looks fairly sophisticated, but you did not mention what you
are using for the backend. I will assume it is an Access backend (as
opposed to sql Server).

Access 2007 is different enough from Access97 (still not OOP though),
that to migrate to Acc2007 won't happen in 5 minutes (depending on how
much code you have behind that form - I will guess a lot - been there).

You probably can't just import all the object from the Acc97 to Acc2007
db. So I could create your form(s) and copy the controls and get the
form(s) going. Then just copy and paste the code from the code modules.
When the debugger starts complaining, that is when you can post what
each bug/complaint is and take it from there.

Just a suggestion here, but as long as you are migrating to a newer
technology, for an app as sophisticated as the one on your site - I
would go with VB.Net2005. It is OOP, but once you get the hang of OOP
you will find that the coding required will be reduced by almost 50% -
no kidding. Much more scalable, flexible, and doesn't have the
limitations of Access if you happen to step your backend up to Sql
Server (or Oracle). VB2005 might be overkill for a simple application,
but for complex ones - it makes them much simpler to mange than Access.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***

May 24 '07 #3

P: n/a
The form did seem a little overwhelming, lots of functions. I have had
to deal with these also. What I did was to group the functions, like
Reporting stuff would go under a Reports button which would bring up a
Reports form that would have buttons just for different kinds of
reporting, and so on.

I would break up your form by grouping the functions into more general
functions and then bring up various forms for each group of more
specific functions. It will make it a little easier to maintain also,
rather than having to scroll one gigantic code module.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
May 24 '07 #4

P: n/a
Unless there are specific functionallity that you can't perform in Access,
but can in VB.Net, then switching to VB.Net for a data centric application
is a waste of time, and will require MORE coding, not less. And for
reporting, you will have to use SQL Reporting Services or Crystal Reports.

Regarding upscaling to SQL, Access is more than capable of using SQL Server
as a back-end server, including executing passthrough queries on the server.

Now, if you need to go break your application into three tiers (GUI,
business rules, data server), then VB.Net is the way to go.

Steven

"Rich P" <rp*****@aol.comwrote in message
news:46*********************@news.qwest.net...
<snip>
Just a suggestion here, but as long as you are migrating to a newer
technology, for an app as sophisticated as the one on your site - I
would go with VB.Net2005. It is OOP, but once you get the hang of OOP
you will find that the coding required will be reduced by almost 50% -
no kidding. Much more scalable, flexible, and doesn't have the
limitations of Access if you happen to step your backend up to Sql
Server (or Oracle). VB2005 might be overkill for a simple application,
but for complex ones - it makes them much simpler to mange than Access.

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***

May 25 '07 #5

P: n/a
Rich P <rp*****@aol.comwrote:
>Access 2007 is different enough from Access97 (still not OOP though),
that to migrate to Acc2007 won't happen in 5 minutes (depending on how
much code you have behind that form - I will guess a lot - been there).
Oh? How so?
>You probably can't just import all the object from the Acc97 to Acc2007
db.
Again why not?

One system I've been able to convert over for testing purposes had 450 forms, 350
reports and 70,000 lines of code and it converted just fine.
>So I could create your form(s) and copy the controls and get the
form(s) going. Then just copy and paste the code from the code modules.
When the debugger starts complaining, that is when you can post what
each bug/complaint is and take it from there.
This certainly hasn't been my experience. I was working on one database with
hundred forms and another hundred reports half the time in A2007 and the other half
time in A2003 going back and forth at the whim of the moment.
>Just a suggestion here, but as long as you are migrating to a newer
technology, for an app as sophisticated as the one on your site - I
would go with VB.Net2005. It is OOP, but once you get the hang of OOP
you will find that the coding required will be reduced by almost 50% -
no kidding. Much more scalable, flexible, and doesn't have the
limitations of Access if you happen to step your backend up to Sql
Server (or Oracle). VB2005 might be overkill for a simple application,
but for complex ones - it makes them much simpler to mange than Access.
Simpler? I know next to nothing about VB.Net but that certainly hasn't been what
I've read.

Essentially this would require a complete rewrite of the app.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
May 27 '07 #6

P: n/a
Rich P <rp*****@aol.comwrote in
news:46*********************@news.qwest.net:
as long as you are migrating to a newer
technology, for an app as sophisticated as the one on your site -
I would go with VB.Net2005. It is OOP, but once you get the hang
of OOP you will find that the coding required will be reduced by
almost 50% - no kidding. Much more scalable, flexible, and
doesn't have the limitations of Access if you happen to step your
backend up to Sql Server (or Oracle).
What limitations would those be? Specifically, that is, not in some
general fashion.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
May 27 '07 #7

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