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StrConv question... (continued from an old post)

P: n/a
MLH

Tom van Stiphout pointed out a syntaxn error that I
had made using StrConv on Mar 28. I was using
vbFromUnicode instead of vbUnicode. So, am OK
on that now.

Can someone help me understand what is being done
in the StrConv operation that turns this 19-character
string into a 38-char string:
?StrConv("My****@MyDomain.com", vbUnicode)
M y A d d r @ M y D o m a i n . c o m

Here are the ASCII codes for each of the 38 characters:
77 0 121 0 65 0 100 0 100 0 114 0 64 0 77 0 121 0
68 0 111 0 109 0 97 0 105 0 110 0 46 0 99 0 111 0
109 0
What purpose is served by inserting a Chr$(0) after each character?
May 14 '07 #1
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P: n/a
MLH wrote:
>
Tom van Stiphout pointed out a syntaxn error that I
had made using StrConv on Mar 28. I was using
vbFromUnicode instead of vbUnicode. So, am OK
on that now.

Can someone help me understand what is being done
in the StrConv operation that turns this 19-character
string into a 38-char string:
?StrConv("My****@MyDomain.com", vbUnicode)
M y A d d r @ M y D o m a i n . c o m

Here are the ASCII codes for each of the 38 characters:
77 0 121 0 65 0 100 0 100 0 114 0 64 0 77 0 121 0
68 0 111 0 109 0 97 0 105 0 110 0 46 0 99 0 111 0
109 0
What purpose is served by inserting a Chr$(0) after each character?
http://homepage.mac.com/thgewecke/unicode.html

From the article
"UTF-16 and 32 are not normally used to represent Unicode over the
internet. This is because various internet processes depend on the
recognition of 7-bit ASCII strings to function properly. When such ASCII
strings are encoded in the UTF -32 and 16 formats, they become
interspersed with bytes of the form 00, which represent the NULL control
character. This can make correct recognition difficult. Also there is
the general possiblity of UTF-16/32 bytes being interpreted as 7-bit
ASCII when this was not the intention, which could cause major problems.
In HTML documents, for example, almost all of the 33 control characters
present in 7-bit ASCII are not allowed."
May 14 '07 #2

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