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A07 RTF w/SQL Server

P: n/a
I was reading on the Microsoft web site that to use the Rich Text property
in Access 2007, that you needed to set the table field's TextFormat property
to RichText, in addition to setting the text box's property as well. Where
does that leave SQL Server users?

If one uses SQL Server as a back end, one cannot set the TextFormat property
(since it doesn't exist). Would setting the property (if it even exists) in
the ODBC link to the SQL Server table suffice to be able to use the property
with a SQL Server back end? Or is using the new RichText property with a SQL
Server back end out of the question?

Thanks!

Neil
May 6 '07 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Neil wrote:
I was reading on the Microsoft web site that to use the Rich Text
property in Access 2007, that you needed to set the table field's
TextFormat property to RichText, in addition to setting the text
box's property as well. Where does that leave SQL Server users?

If one uses SQL Server as a back end, one cannot set the TextFormat
property (since it doesn't exist). Would setting the property (if it
even exists) in the ODBC link to the SQL Server table suffice to be
able to use the property with a SQL Server back end? Or is using the
new RichText property with a SQL Server back end out of the question?

Thanks!

Neil
It appears to work fine with a SQL Server text field. Setting the text format
property to Rich Text on the link does take even though you get the warning that
certain aspects of linked tables cannot be altered.

If you don't even bother to set the text format of the link field and just do it
in the form it gives you a warning, but still works.
--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
May 6 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Sun, 06 May 2007 12:26:14 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.comwrote:

RTF is essentially standard text with some html-like meta-information.
It can be stored in a standard text field.

-Tom.
>Neil wrote:
>I was reading on the Microsoft web site that to use the Rich Text
property in Access 2007, that you needed to set the table field's
TextFormat property to RichText, in addition to setting the text
box's property as well. Where does that leave SQL Server users?

If one uses SQL Server as a back end, one cannot set the TextFormat
property (since it doesn't exist). Would setting the property (if it
even exists) in the ODBC link to the SQL Server table suffice to be
able to use the property with a SQL Server back end? Or is using the
new RichText property with a SQL Server back end out of the question?

Thanks!

Neil

It appears to work fine with a SQL Server text field. Setting the text format
property to Rich Text on the link does take even though you get the warning that
certain aspects of linked tables cannot be altered.

If you don't even bother to set the text format of the link field and just do it
in the form it gives you a warning, but still works.
May 6 '07 #3

P: n/a
Great! Thanks! Wondering something: does setting or not setting the RichText
property in the back end affect whether nor not you can access the plain
text in the field? The Microsoft Rich Textbox Control had a feature where
you could just see the plain text through a property of the text box. Is
that available with the RichText property, and does whether or not you set
the property in the back end affect that?

Thanks!

Neil
"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:GP****************@newssvr14.news.prodigy.net ...
Neil wrote:
>I was reading on the Microsoft web site that to use the Rich Text
property in Access 2007, that you needed to set the table field's
TextFormat property to RichText, in addition to setting the text
box's property as well. Where does that leave SQL Server users?

If one uses SQL Server as a back end, one cannot set the TextFormat
property (since it doesn't exist). Would setting the property (if it
even exists) in the ODBC link to the SQL Server table suffice to be
able to use the property with a SQL Server back end? Or is using the
new RichText property with a SQL Server back end out of the question?

Thanks!

Neil

It appears to work fine with a SQL Server text field. Setting the text
format property to Rich Text on the link does take even though you get the
warning that certain aspects of linked tables cannot be altered.

If you don't even bother to set the text format of the link field and just
do it in the form it gives you a warning, but still works.
--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com


May 6 '07 #4

P: n/a
Microsoft in their article about Rich Text talks about rich text getting
"out of sync" if you don't set the back end property. Maybe that just
happens if someone directly updates the back end or does so through a text
box that isn't set to Rich Text. That would make sense.

"Tom van Stiphout" <no*************@cox.netwrote in message
news:3u********************************@4ax.com...
On Sun, 06 May 2007 12:26:14 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.comwrote:

RTF is essentially standard text with some html-like meta-information.
It can be stored in a standard text field.

-Tom.
>>Neil wrote:
>>I was reading on the Microsoft web site that to use the Rich Text
property in Access 2007, that you needed to set the table field's
TextFormat property to RichText, in addition to setting the text
box's property as well. Where does that leave SQL Server users?

If one uses SQL Server as a back end, one cannot set the TextFormat
property (since it doesn't exist). Would setting the property (if it
even exists) in the ODBC link to the SQL Server table suffice to be
able to use the property with a SQL Server back end? Or is using the
new RichText property with a SQL Server back end out of the question?

Thanks!

Neil

It appears to work fine with a SQL Server text field. Setting the text
format
property to Rich Text on the link does take even though you get the
warning that
certain aspects of linked tables cannot be altered.

If you don't even bother to set the text format of the link field and just
do it
in the form it gives you a warning, but still works.

May 6 '07 #5

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