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Question on Query criteria

P: n/a
Hi,

OK, I admit it from the outset, this may seem like a really silly
question but an explanation is stumping me.

The file I have been modifying runs a query when the main form & subform
open. Anyway, the query populates ten fields from the main table when
the subform opens. The first columns "Criteria" line has the following,

Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And <>"0"

with <>"0" repeated on each of the subsequent 9 "or" lines in the first
column. The Like statement is repeated for each of the subsequent
fields and columns as you go along and down.

So, here's the question -- What's the <>"0" mean? Is this the same as
saying "is not null". If I leave this in, the subform often tells me
the expression is too complex to be evaluated. If it is taken out, all
seems to work OK. This is the same form/subform I carried over from the
original file and it was working without any problems in the old file.
The only difference is I've split the new database as the old one was
taking too long to open on the network.

Thanx in advance,

Stinky Pete ;-)

Feb 13 '07 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
Stinky Pete wrote:
Hi,

OK, I admit it from the outset, this may seem like a really silly
question but an explanation is stumping me.

The file I have been modifying runs a query when the main form & subform
open. Anyway, the query populates ten fields from the main table when
the subform opens. The first columns "Criteria" line has the following,

Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And <>"0"

with <>"0" repeated on each of the subsequent 9 "or" lines in the first
column. The Like statement is repeated for each of the subsequent
fields and columns as you go along and down.
So, here's the question -- What's the <>"0" mean? Is this the same as
saying "is not null". If I leave this in, the subform often tells me
the expression is too complex to be evaluated. If it is taken out, all
seems to work OK. This is the same form/subform I carried over from the
original file and it was working without any problems in the old file.
The only difference is I've split the new database as the old one was
taking too long to open on the network.

Thanx in advance,

Stinky Pete ;-)
It looks incorrect. The <"0" isn't being compared to anything. It
might make sense if it were
Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And _
[Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch]<>"0"
Feb 13 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Feb 14, 1:00 am, salad <o...@vinegar.comwrote:
Stinky Pete wrote:
Hi,
OK, I admit it from the outset, this may seem like a really silly
question but an explanation is stumping me.
The file I have been modifying runs a query when the main form & subform
open. Anyway, the query populates ten fields from the main table when
the subform opens. The first columns "Criteria" line has the following,
Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And <>"0"
with <>"0" repeated on each of the subsequent 9 "or" lines in the first
column. The Like statement is repeated for each of the subsequent
fields and columns as you go along and down.
So, here's the question -- What's the <>"0" mean? Is this the same as
saying "is not null". If I leave this in, the subform often tells me
the expression is too complex to be evaluated. If it is taken out, all
seems to work OK. This is the same form/subform I carried over from the
original file and it was working without any problems in the old file.
The only difference is I've split the new database as the old one was
taking too long to open on the network.
Thanx in advance,
Stinky Pete ;-)

It looks incorrect. The <"0" isn't being compared to anything. It
might make sense if it were
Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And _
[Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch]<>"0" - Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Thanx for the update and comment. I'll give it a whirl to see what
happens after pasting the new bit into the query. Could anyone still
give me a heads up as to what the <>"0" bit is supposed to be doing?

Stinky Pete ;-)

Feb 13 '07 #3

P: n/a
Stinky Pete wrote:
On Feb 14, 1:00 am, salad <o...@vinegar.comwrote:
>>Stinky Pete wrote:
>>>Hi,
>>>OK, I admit it from the outset, this may seem like a really silly
question but an explanation is stumping me.
>>>The file I have been modifying runs a query when the main form & subform
open. Anyway, the query populates ten fields from the main table when
the subform opens. The first columns "Criteria" line has the following,
>>>Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And <>"0"
>>>with <>"0" repeated on each of the subsequent 9 "or" lines in the first
column. The Like statement is repeated for each of the subsequent
fields and columns as you go along and down.
So, here's the question -- What's the <>"0" mean? Is this the same as
saying "is not null". If I leave this in, the subform often tells me
the expression is too complex to be evaluated. If it is taken out, all
seems to work OK. This is the same form/subform I carried over from the
original file and it was working without any problems in the old file.
The only difference is I've split the new database as the old one was
taking too long to open on the network.
>>>Thanx in advance,
>>>Stinky Pete ;-)

It looks incorrect. The <"0" isn't being compared to anything. It
might make sense if it were
Like "*" & [Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch] & "*" And _
[Forms]![NCF List]![BroardSearch]<>"0" - Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Thanx for the update and comment. I'll give it a whirl to see what
happens after pasting the new bit into the query. Could anyone still
give me a heads up as to what the <>"0" bit is supposed to be doing?

Stinky Pete ;-)
It's asking for searches of [BroardSearch] but don't look at those that
aren't 0. The original coder did it wrong.

You can keep it in or not. Btw, what is a Broard?
Feb 14 '07 #4

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