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Start Main Menu Form when you open Access

4
I have a form named Main Menu in Access. Instead of openning Access and double click that form to start a session. I would like to have that form start automatically when I double click or open Access. I'm using Access 2000.

Can someone provide a solution? Thank you.
Feb 2 '07 #1
8 13991
Rabbit
12,516 Expert Mod 8TB
Tools > Startup

You can set a bunch of options for when the file opens.
Feb 2 '07 #2
ADezii
8,800 Expert 8TB
I have a form named Main Menu in Access. Instead of openning Access and double click that form to start a session. I would like to have that form start automatically when I double click or open Access. I'm using Access 2000.

Can someone provide a solution? Thank you.
Create a New Macro abd name it AutoExec
__1 Specify OpenForm for the Action Argument.
__2 At the bottom of the Macro Window enter additional information such as: Form Name, Data View, etc.
__3 The next time you open the database, your Form will be the first thing you see.
Feb 2 '07 #3
NeoPa
32,173 Expert Mod 16PB
In the Startup Options (See post #2) there is a specific option for this.
Many people feel they don't want to use macros as they are old technology and harder to support. I would have to recommend the Startup option for preference (of the two solutions - both of which work), unless there are reasons we don't know of which would make this inappropriate in your particular case.
Feb 4 '07 #4
ADezii
8,800 Expert 8TB
In the Startup Options (See post #2) there is a specific option for this.
Many people feel they don't want to use macros as they are old technology and harder to support. I would have to recommend the Startup option for preference (of the two solutions - both of which work), unless there are reasons we don't know of which would make this inappropriate in your particular case.
NeoPa:
I don't think the AutoExec Macro will ever become obsolete, do you?
Feb 4 '07 #5
NeoPa
32,173 Expert Mod 16PB
I'm afraid I think it will ADezii.
I guess you like the macro side of things, I know you're a bit of a wiz at them, and we really benefit from your experience in that area, but I don't like macros myself (Probably my own prejudice).
As macros are so limited and hard to document, I feel that most programmers will have to get into the VBA side at some stage, so it's better that they get their feet wet straight away. Then they don't have to learn two sets of rules.

Specifically, most Access programmers I know will create a nothing form with code in the OnOpen event to replace the functionality of the AutoExec macro in VBA code.
Feb 4 '07 #6
Rabbit
12,516 Expert Mod 8TB
I personally don't like macros either.

Rather than a nothing form I usually do it through a main menu which I setup to open everytime using Tools > Startup.
Feb 5 '07 #7
NeoPa
32,173 Expert Mod 16PB
I was trying to say that a nothing form would be used even if there weren't any reason to open a form. If a main menu is required then I can't imagine anyone would use an AutoExec macro. Maybe that's wrong, there's a whole world of different ideas and ways of going about things I suppose.
Too bad they're all wrong except for mine ;)
Feb 5 '07 #8
NeoPa
32,173 Expert Mod 16PB
A new topic was posted in here by a visitor so it's been moved to its own thread. You can find it in AutoExec Macro - Is It Really?.
Nov 2 '10 #9

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