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What database object or table is corrupted.

P: n/a
Is there any way to find out what database object or table was corrupt after
a repair has run in Access 2000? If I can find this out I may find out why
the corruption is happening.
Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark

Dec 29 '06 #1
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3 Replies


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On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 22:09:44 -0500, "NEWSGROUPS"
<ma***********@comcast.netwrote:

If the R&C was successful, I don't think that information is made
available to us mere mortals.
You may be able to find out BEFORE you R&C, depending on the kind of
corruption. For example corruption of a memo field is a fairly common
occurrence. You can write DAO code to loop over the tables, and over
the fields, looking for memo fields. Once found you loop over the
records, trying to read the contents of those fields into a string
variable. When it fails, you've found your corruption.
Other kinds of corruption you might find out about when you try to
export that object to another db. Or export the data to a text file.

-Tom.

>Is there any way to find out what database object or table was corrupt after
a repair has run in Access 2000? If I can find this out I may find out why
the corruption is happening.
Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark

Dec 29 '06 #2

P: n/a
Hi, Mark.
Is there any way to find out what database object or table was corrupt after a
repair has run in Access 2000? If I can find this out I may find out why the
corruption is happening.
That's probably not as productive an investigation as it sounds. Corruption
occurs from an interrupted write to disk, but any record in any table may be in
the process of being written to disk and the power cord could be yanked. You
would have a corrupt record or a corrupt table, but that wouldn't tell you that
Mr. Parker has a trip hazard in his office and moving the power cord would
prevent this problem that happens infrequently.

The most common cause of corruption is sharing a multiuser database across the
network. Another very common cause is flaky network hardware. Right up near
the top is "user intervention," i.e., manually turning off the power to the
workstation while Access is open and still writing records.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact info.
"NEWSGROUPS" <ma***********@comcast.netwrote in message
news:Zo******************************@comcast.com. ..
Is there any way to find out what database object or table was corrupt after a
repair has run in Access 2000? If I can find this out I may find out why the
corruption is happening.
Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark

Dec 29 '06 #3

P: n/a
"NEWSGROUPS" <ma***********@comcast.netwrote in
news:Zo******************************@comcast.com:
Is there any way to find out what database object or table was corrupt
after a repair has run in Access 2000? If I can find this out I may
find out why the corruption is happening.
I would try decompiles/compiles and compact/repairs,

Then I would try running the code found at
http://www.ffdba.com/downloads/Save_...ts_As_Text.htm

The procedures should fail on trying to process a corrupted Access Object.
The Error Message->Debug route may identify both the nature and source of
the "corruption".

What will it do with a corrupted table or other JET object? I've never had
a corrupted table so I don't know. Maybe you'll tell us.

--
Lyle Fairfield
Dec 29 '06 #4

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