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Troubles Access/SQL Database on Network

P: n/a
I have an Access database on a Windows Server 2003 share. This
database contains linked tables that actually reside on a SQL Server.
There are a couple of things that I've noticed recently:

1) Some users cannot open the database if another person is already in
it, but some can. The people who cannot open it do not receive any
type of messages...it just doesn't open.

2) Everyone who opens the database (after the first person) receives a
message stating that it is opening Read-Only

I can deal with the second issue, but not the first. I know I've seen
posts on this group stating that you shouldn't share the front end, but
does that still hold true if there are no tables? What are the
disadvantages of sharing the front end, and why would my people not be
able to open it?

Thanks!

Ryan

Dec 21 '06 #1
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"Dowwy" <ry**********@gmail.comwrote
I can deal with the second issue, but not the first. I know I've seen
posts on this group stating that you shouldn't share the front end, but
does that still hold true if there are no tables? What are the
disadvantages of sharing the front end, and why would my people not be
able to open it?
Apparently, for one reason or another, the first user is getting "exclusive
use" -- perhaps due to modifying a database object. Or, that could be the
way the shortcut is set up, if you're using one.

That cannot happen, so doesn't require diagnosis and correction, if each
user has his/her own copy of the front end.

What else doesn't happen is the significantly increased risk (not certainty)
of corruption of the front end.

What else doesn't happen is that every use of a database object doesn't
retrieve it across the network and add to network load/traffic.

It is not a matter of advantages-disadvantages; it is a matter of your being
very lucky if you aren't experiencing corruption problems with multiple
people logged into the same MDB.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Dec 21 '06 #2

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