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Updating a server table from a local table

P: n/a
My application is calculation intensive and the servers are agonizingly slow.
Administrators of my application only update the backends once a month (twice
a month max). So, my launching program allows the back-end file to be
downloaded to the user's PC. This will provide maximum speed for these
calculations/manipulations of data. Without this, just logging into the main
app connected to the server back-end file can take five minutes (normal time
is 15 seconds when linked to back-end file on PC) at some locations. They've
all been told many times that there is a possibility that the local PC data
may not be in sync with the server, but in 6 months that has never been a
problem.

This method works well and my users really appreciate the speed of data
retrieval from the local PC back-end versus the server back-end. However,
updating the server backend is still an issue. Updating can take a long,
long time in some cases and I've been struggling with how to deal with this.

At first I thought:

1) Do a forced logoff of any user connected to the server back-end (app
already has functionality for this). This will also lock everyone out until
the administrator sets that it is okay to connect to the server back-end
again.
2) Make a back-up copy of the server back-end file
3) Have the data entry person download the most current back-end file from
the server to their PC. This is so they have the most current version.
4) Data entry person updates the back-end file on their local PC.
5) Goto Windows explorer and copy the updated local PC back-end over the
server back-end.
But perhaps instead I should just include code in the application that allows
users to overwrite the server backend TABLE which has been updated with a
local PC backend TABLE (let's not talk about the situation where multiple
tables may have been updated yet), rather than copy over the whole file.
This could be a kind of synchronization process.

My users will not use the app if they are forced to always connect to the
server because it is so slow. The solution I have for downloading the
backend files periodically has been working real well. But I am struggling
with how to update the server backend files given the slow server connection.

I would greatly appreciate any comments on the scenarios I presented for
solving this or certainly if you have any other suggestions.

Thanks.

--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com

Dec 13 '06 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 00:33:11 GMT, "rdemyan via AccessMonster.com"
<u6836@uwewrote:

Tough problem. You don't shed a lot of light as to why the server is
so slow. Assuming a 100 base-T network (or get quotes for recabling)
and a server machine not more than 5 years old (or get a new one for
5K USD) and a normal network load there is simply no excuse for that.

That said, I might do async updates with the server. What if each
client machine had an app running whose task it was to take its merry
old time to update the server. This would be a background task, and
users can continue to do other things while the data continues to be
sent to the server.

Have you considered Access replication. I'm not a big fan of it, but
this may be an exception.

-Tom.
>My application is calculation intensive and the servers are agonizingly slow.
Administrators of my application only update the backends once a month (twice
a month max). So, my launching program allows the back-end file to be
downloaded to the user's PC. This will provide maximum speed for these
calculations/manipulations of data. Without this, just logging into the main
app connected to the server back-end file can take five minutes (normal time
is 15 seconds when linked to back-end file on PC) at some locations. They've
all been told many times that there is a possibility that the local PC data
may not be in sync with the server, but in 6 months that has never been a
problem.

This method works well and my users really appreciate the speed of data
retrieval from the local PC back-end versus the server back-end. However,
updating the server backend is still an issue. Updating can take a long,
long time in some cases and I've been struggling with how to deal with this.

At first I thought:

1) Do a forced logoff of any user connected to the server back-end (app
already has functionality for this). This will also lock everyone out until
the administrator sets that it is okay to connect to the server back-end
again.
2) Make a back-up copy of the server back-end file
3) Have the data entry person download the most current back-end file from
the server to their PC. This is so they have the most current version.
4) Data entry person updates the back-end file on their local PC.
5) Goto Windows explorer and copy the updated local PC back-end over the
server back-end.
But perhaps instead I should just include code in the application that allows
users to overwrite the server backend TABLE which has been updated with a
local PC backend TABLE (let's not talk about the situation where multiple
tables may have been updated yet), rather than copy over the whole file.
This could be a kind of synchronization process.

My users will not use the app if they are forced to always connect to the
server because it is so slow. The solution I have for downloading the
backend files periodically has been working real well. But I am struggling
with how to update the server backend files given the slow server connection.

I would greatly appreciate any comments on the scenarios I presented for
solving this or certainly if you have any other suggestions.

Thanks.
Dec 13 '06 #2

P: n/a
Tom:

It's a very highly secure network, nothing can be downloaded, users have no
admin rights (so no software installation), zip and other files are
automatically removed from emails. Need I say more?

Interesting you mention replication. I just discovered that there is such a
thing and am trying to research it. Any links on where I can learn about
what this is exactly?

Thanks.

Tom van Stiphout wrote:
>Tough problem. You don't shed a lot of light as to why the server is
so slow. Assuming a 100 base-T network (or get quotes for recabling)
and a server machine not more than 5 years old (or get a new one for
5K USD) and a normal network load there is simply no excuse for that.

That said, I might do async updates with the server. What if each
client machine had an app running whose task it was to take its merry
old time to update the server. This would be a background task, and
users can continue to do other things while the data continues to be
sent to the server.

Have you considered Access replication. I'm not a big fan of it, but
this may be an exception.

-Tom.
>>My application is calculation intensive and the servers are agonizingly slow.
Administrators of my application only update the backends once a month (twice
[quoted text clipped - 40 lines]
>>
Thanks.
--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com

Dec 13 '06 #3

P: n/a
On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 05:11:17 GMT, "rdemyan via AccessMonster.com"
<u6836@uwewrote:

Security doesn't make it slow.

Access replication is an advanced topic and not for the faint of
heart. Check out trigeminal.com.

-Tom.

>Tom:

It's a very highly secure network, nothing can be downloaded, users have no
admin rights (so no software installation), zip and other files are
automatically removed from emails. Need I say more?

Interesting you mention replication. I just discovered that there is such a
thing and am trying to research it. Any links on where I can learn about
what this is exactly?

Thanks.

Tom van Stiphout wrote:
>>Tough problem. You don't shed a lot of light as to why the server is
so slow. Assuming a 100 base-T network (or get quotes for recabling)
and a server machine not more than 5 years old (or get a new one for
5K USD) and a normal network load there is simply no excuse for that.

That said, I might do async updates with the server. What if each
client machine had an app running whose task it was to take its merry
old time to update the server. This would be a background task, and
users can continue to do other things while the data continues to be
sent to the server.

Have you considered Access replication. I'm not a big fan of it, but
this may be an exception.

-Tom.
>>>My application is calculation intensive and the servers are agonizingly slow.
Administrators of my application only update the backends once a month (twice
[quoted text clipped - 40 lines]
>>>
Thanks.
Dec 13 '06 #4

P: n/a
Are you talking about a wan, or a lan?

I high speed t1 line is 100 times slower then a super cheap office netowrk.

I speak of a wan vs a lan, and its probems here:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal//Wan/Wans.html
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
Dec 15 '06 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.