By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
444,027 Members | 1,271 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 444,027 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

access to rdbms server

P: n/a
A dump question:

for project using access as front-end and RDBMS server (such as sqlsvr) as
backend, do we create db in backend first before linking front-end with, or
vice versa?

Any comment is appreciated.
Dec 10 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a
"Steven" <sc*****@verizon.netwrote in message
news:kX%eh.4556$bj5.436@trnddc07...
>A dump question:

for project using access as front-end and RDBMS server (such as sqlsvr) as
backend, do we create db in backend first before linking front-end with, or
vice versa?
Well, if you don't create the tables on the server first then you have nothing
to create links to in the front end. Now, when doing a new database I might
mock up the table designs in the front end file first until the design
requirements of the tables is well defined and then set them up on the server,
but the tables are always the starting point.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Dec 10 '06 #2

P: n/a

"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:h0****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.net ...
"Steven" <sc*****@verizon.netwrote in message
news:kX%eh.4556$bj5.436@trnddc07...
>>A dump question:

for project using access as front-end and RDBMS server (such as sqlsvr)
as backend, do we create db in backend first before linking front-end
with, or vice versa?

Well, if you don't create the tables on the server first then you have
nothing to create links to in the front end. Now, when doing a new
database I might mock up the table designs in the front end file first
until the design requirements of the tables is well defined and then set
them up on the server, but the tables are always the starting point.
In many cases, companies with a server database have Database Administrators
(DBA) who are the only ones allowed to actually create databases for the
server, including the tables, stored procedures, triggers, etc.. If that is
the case, then initial table design and testing in the front end is even
more advisable, so you don't have to keep running to the DBA for minor
changes you find necessary.

If you are "into server DB" as well as client applications in Access, there
is a Developer edition of Microsoft SQL Server, so you might get permission
to do your initial work with that on your development machine, and then the
DBA review and transfer the tables to the remote server.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Dec 10 '06 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.