By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
443,890 Members | 1,226 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 443,890 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Protecting an idea

P: n/a
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how, to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul
Nov 24 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
12 Replies


P: n/a
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk:
Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present
my idea to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could
easily copy it and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code (at this stage) just the idea?
Deal with fair, ethical people. Stay away from the police.

--
Lyle Fairfield
Nov 24 '06 #2

P: n/a
well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul


Nov 24 '06 #3

P: n/a
Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught that
charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
>A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
>one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how,
to
>set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
>to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy
it
>and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
>(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul



Nov 24 '06 #4

P: n/a
Patents and copyright , and loads of cash to back those up, are the usual
way of protecting intellectual property.

You cannot protect "ideas", only some actual physical expression of those
ideas. Have you really searched for previous implementations of your idea?
My first "invention" was trundling around the track back in 1923. (:-<)
Quite often ideas are before their time, and, though in the public domain,
do not get tried again when the technology finally catches up. The chap
that invented Dental Anaestheia went bankrupt trying to get paid. Good luck.

"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught that
charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
>>A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
>>one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
>>set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
>>to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy
it
>>and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
>>(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul





Nov 24 '06 #5

P: n/a
well, as David says, good luck with that.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught that
charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily
copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul



Nov 24 '06 #6

P: n/a
>With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
>getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that
charity begins at home.
He will need marketing talent. After seeing his choice of place to float
that philosophy...

"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:JR*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, as David says, good luck with that.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
>Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that
charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that
volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present
my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily
copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul





Nov 25 '06 #7

P: n/a
yeah, that crossed my mind as well <g>
"David F Cox" <no****@nospam.zzwrote in message
news:Fm*******************@newsfe6-gui.ntli.net...
With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that
charity begins at home.

He will need marketing talent. After seeing his choice of place to float
that philosophy...

"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:JR*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, as David says, good luck with that.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that
charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important
to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to
implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that
volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to
demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written
in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a
database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite
a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want
to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present
my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily
copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not
the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul





Nov 25 '06 #8

P: n/a
Thanks David,

Very helpful comments.

:O)

Paul
"David F Cox" <no****@nospam.zzwrote in message
news:JL******************@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
Patents and copyright , and loads of cash to back those up, are the usual
way of protecting intellectual property.

You cannot protect "ideas", only some actual physical expression of those
ideas. Have you really searched for previous implementations of your idea?
My first "invention" was trundling around the track back in 1923. (:-<)
Quite often ideas are before their time, and, though in the public domain,
do not get tried again when the technology finally catches up. The chap
that invented Dental Anaestheia went bankrupt trying to get paid. Good
luck.

"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
>Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>>well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily
copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul





Nov 27 '06 #9

P: n/a
Thanks David,

Very helpful comments.

:O)

Paul
"David F Cox" <no****@nospam.zzwrote in message
news:JL******************@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
Patents and copyright , and loads of cash to back those up, are the usual
way of protecting intellectual property.

You cannot protect "ideas", only some actual physical expression of those
ideas. Have you really searched for previous implementations of your idea?
My first "invention" was trundling around the track back in 1923. (:-<)
Quite often ideas are before their time, and, though in the public domain,
do not get tried again when the technology finally catches up. The chap
that invented Dental Anaestheia went bankrupt trying to get paid. Good
luck.

"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:8L********************@eclipse.net.uk...
>Tina,

With respect. I will be providing a service for the greater good "and"
getting paid for it. Everyones a winner. Besides, I was always taught
that charity begins at home.

Regards,

Paul
"tina" <no****@address.comwrote in message
news:q0*******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>>well, if your idea is that simple and easy, and would be helpful to
police
forces all over the country, is making a buck really that important to
you?
how about writing your application, demonstrating its' value to "the
Metropolitan Police", and offering to donate your services to implement
it?
looking at the big picture, it wouldn't be the first time that volunteer
service to the community leads to paid work - it's a way to demonstrate
your
skills and your character.
"Paul H" <pa**@nospam.comwrote in message
news:qY********************@eclipse.net.uk...
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical
know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily
copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul






Nov 27 '06 #10

P: n/a
Paul -
The only way to do so would be to have proof the idea originated from
you. Even then, copyrighting an idea is difficult. It's more feasable
to copyright a PROCESS. To do so would take some time, but if you
document a logic process and copyright it you could have some success.

The closest thing I can compare it to is this article:
http://www.springwise.com/entertainm...tant_bootlegs/

Clear Channel copyrighted a PROCESS of recording live events and making
them available to fans on their way out of venues. I don't know that
it ever caught on, but they do have a copyright for the process which
makes it near impossible for another company to get into the game.

At either rate, I agree with the person who said to offer it for free.
This will look outstanding on a resume, as well as open you up to other
programming opportunities your newly-created connections might bring.
Instead of the quick buck (which is extremely difficult to find),
you'll be opening up a world of long-term opportunity.

Paul H wrote:
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how, to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul
Nov 27 '06 #11

P: n/a
I have heeded everyone's advice and emailed my idea to
http://www.pito.org.uk/. I spoke to a very helpful lady who said that these
ideas are presented at regular committee meetings, the next one is in
January.

If the idea is not taken up by them I am considering creating a web site and
doing the whole thing off my own back. I could then use the information I
collect to put pressure on the police or the government to take this idea
seriously. I think it is a great idea that gives the public the power to
fight crime simply, anonymously and very effectively. I believe without a
shadow of a doubt that this system would both save lives and encourage
people to have a greater social conscience.

....and if I get to buy a house in Tahiti off the back of it, then great! ;o)

Paul

"ManningFan" <ma********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@14g2000cws.googlegro ups.com...
Paul -
The only way to do so would be to have proof the idea originated from
you. Even then, copyrighting an idea is difficult. It's more feasable
to copyright a PROCESS. To do so would take some time, but if you
document a logic process and copyright it you could have some success.

The closest thing I can compare it to is this article:
http://www.springwise.com/entertainm...tant_bootlegs/

Clear Channel copyrighted a PROCESS of recording live events and making
them available to fans on their way out of venues. I don't know that
it ever caught on, but they do have a copyright for the process which
makes it near impossible for another company to get into the game.

At either rate, I agree with the person who said to offer it for free.
This will look outstanding on a resume, as well as open you up to other
programming opportunities your newly-created connections might bring.
Instead of the quick buck (which is extremely difficult to find),
you'll be opening up a world of long-term opportunity.

Paul H wrote:
>A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul

Nov 29 '06 #12

P: n/a
Paul -
The last bit of advice I would offer is this; putting pressure on the
police or government won't work. Instead, develop a process and
approach community leaders (school principals, priests, other assorted
pedophiles) and put the idea to them AFTER it has been developed. I
joke about the pedophiles part, in the U.S. all community leaders seem
to be one these days...

Anyway, I digress. If you can convince the people in touch at the
community levels, the pressure you seek will come from multiple angles
and thus be more difficult to ignore. Once it builds a little steam,
seek an audience with your local legislator or government
representative. Present the complete idea and program (don't worry
about bugs, as long as it more or less does what you're pitching you
should be fine) to them and explain why and how it will help SAVE THEM
MONEY. Remember, being in government isn't really about being a great
guy, it's about proving to the tax payers you can save them money so
they'll re-elect you and pay you some stupid amount in pensions for the
rest of your life.

If they still don't buy it, see if you can tweak it so it can be used
in big business. They're usually more receptive to spending money to
raise their bottom line.

Paul H wrote:
I have heeded everyone's advice and emailed my idea to
http://www.pito.org.uk/. I spoke to a very helpful lady who said that these
ideas are presented at regular committee meetings, the next one is in
January.

If the idea is not taken up by them I am considering creating a web site and
doing the whole thing off my own back. I could then use the information I
collect to put pressure on the police or the government to take this idea
seriously. I think it is a great idea that gives the public the power to
fight crime simply, anonymously and very effectively. I believe without a
shadow of a doubt that this system would both save lives and encourage
people to have a greater social conscience.

...and if I get to buy a house in Tahiti off the back of it, then great! ;o)

Paul

"ManningFan" <ma********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@14g2000cws.googlegro ups.com...
Paul -
The only way to do so would be to have proof the idea originated from
you. Even then, copyrighting an idea is difficult. It's more feasable
to copyright a PROCESS. To do so would take some time, but if you
document a logic process and copyright it you could have some success.

The closest thing I can compare it to is this article:
http://www.springwise.com/entertainm...tant_bootlegs/

Clear Channel copyrighted a PROCESS of recording live events and making
them available to fans on their way out of venues. I don't know that
it ever caught on, but they do have a copyright for the process which
makes it near impossible for another company to get into the game.

At either rate, I agree with the person who said to offer it for free.
This will look outstanding on a resume, as well as open you up to other
programming opportunities your newly-created connections might bring.
Instead of the quick buck (which is extremely difficult to find),
you'll be opening up a world of long-term opportunity.

Paul H wrote:
A little off topic this one because the database may not be written in
Access. I am just looking for some advice..

I have an idea to help prevent a particular type of crime, a database
will
be involved in storing and analysing information. The idea is quite a
simple
one and once disclosed would be easy, with reasonable technical know-how,
to
set-up.

Police forces all over the country could use my system, but I want to
approach the Metropolitan Police first. The trouble is, if I present my
idea
to them, which takes about 30 seconds to explain, they could easily copy
it
and get a developer to write the software themselves.

So, given what I have said above. How to you protect the idea? Not the
code
(at this stage) just the idea?

Thanks,

Paul
Nov 29 '06 #13

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.