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Windows Permissions & Compacting

P: n/a
Hi everyone,
This is not the forum for Windows permissions, but I figure this has to
be an issue one of you access experts has had to deal with.

I have an XP system with an access db on it. The directory has
permissions so that the warehouse user can read/write. Everything
works great until I log in as admin and open the access database. When
the database closes it compacts and rewrites itself to the directory.
Now the permissions on that file are changed and even though the
directory allows the warehouse user access the database file does not.
The obvious answer is to not compact on close, but I would prefer not
to have to be relegated to that.
Thanks
P

Sep 30 '06 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
"Pachydermitis" <pr*******@gmail.comwrote in
news:11*********************@e3g2000cwe.googlegrou ps.com:
I have an XP system with an access db on it. The directory has
permissions so that the warehouse user can read/write. Everything
works great until I log in as admin and open the access database.
When the database closes it compacts and rewrites itself to the
directory. Now the permissions on that file are changed and even
though the directory allows the warehouse user access the database
file does not. The obvious answer is to not compact on close, but
I would prefer not to have to be relegated to that.
Compact on close is useless in *all* situations and dangerous in
many, so I'd say kill the compact on close.

But you'd have the same problem with a manual compact, I suspect.

You need to set the permissions on the folder for child objects. I
don't see any obvious way to add this permission if it doesn't
already exist, so you'd have to set the permissions on the folder
itself, since files created in the folder inherit the rights of the
folder in the absence of child object permissions.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Sep 30 '06 #2

P: n/a
"Pachydermitis" <pr*******@gmail.comwrote in
news:11*********************@e3g2000cwe.googlegrou ps.com:
I have an XP system with an access db on it. The directory has
permissions so that the warehouse user can read/write. Everything
works great until I log in as admin and open the access database.
When the database closes it compacts and rewrites itself to the
directory. Now the permissions on that file are changed and even
though the directory allows the warehouse user access the database
file does not. The obvious answer is to not compact on close, but
I would prefer not to have to be relegated to that.
I posted too soon. In the advanced security editing dialog, there is
an APPLY ONTO dropdown that allows you to set permissions on the
parent folder that apply to files or subfolders and files.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Sep 30 '06 #3

P: n/a
David, thanks for the tip. Unfortunately, I tried that check box early
on in the hair pulling session. I guess I'll just kill the compact on
close. :(

David W. Fenton wrote:
"Pachydermitis" <pr*******@gmail.comwrote in
news:11*********************@e3g2000cwe.googlegrou ps.com:
I have an XP system with an access db on it. The directory has
permissions so that the warehouse user can read/write. Everything
works great until I log in as admin and open the access database.
When the database closes it compacts and rewrites itself to the
directory. Now the permissions on that file are changed and even
though the directory allows the warehouse user access the database
file does not. The obvious answer is to not compact on close, but
I would prefer not to have to be relegated to that.

I posted too soon. In the advanced security editing dialog, there is
an APPLY ONTO dropdown that allows you to set permissions on the
parent folder that apply to files or subfolders and files.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Oct 1 '06 #4

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