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.mdb, .adp and SQL Features and Benefits

P: n/a
Hi,

I'm still riding my development bicycle with training wheels attached.

What are the FAB's of having an SQL Backend? Why would I use and ADP as
instead of an MDB?

In my practical example, I have a beautiful MDE front-end (on each
user's machine) that accesses one central MDB backend. I will probably
have a maximum of 6 users using at any one time.

I am beginning to worry about the time that my application takes to
access data and run queries; this has prompted my research into this
topic. So is an SQL BE for me, how would I do it, and what is an ADP?

Sep 6 '06 #1
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P: n/a
"Warren" <wa***********@pacificnational.com.auwrote in message
news:11**********************@p79g2000cwp.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I'm still riding my development bicycle with training wheels attached.

What are the FAB's of having an SQL Backend? Why would I use and ADP as
instead of an MDB?

In my practical example, I have a beautiful MDE front-end (on each
user's machine) that accesses one central MDB backend. I will probably
have a maximum of 6 users using at any one time.

I am beginning to worry about the time that my application takes to
access data and run queries; this has prompted my research into this
topic. So is an SQL BE for me, how would I do it, and what is an ADP?
One should not move to Server back end for performance reasons. There are very
few cases where performance is improved. Server engines are more secure,
stable, and are scalable to tremendous amounts of data and numbers of
simultaneous users. They can be run 24/7 and don't have to be taken off-line to
perform backups. These are the reasons to go to a server back end, not
performance.

An ADP is an Access front end that links directly to a SQL Server database. It
more closely integrates with the database than using an MDB with ODBC links, but
that has turned out to be of dubious value in actual practice. MDBs over ODBC
work just fine and you aren't limited with them to only a single SQL Server back
end as you are with an ADP

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com

Sep 6 '06 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Rick,

That's both informative and relieving. Much appreciated.

Sep 7 '06 #3

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