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MSysAccessStorage Error when opening and closing db

P: n/a
I'm getting the following error message both when opening and closing my dB.

The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table or query
'MSysAccessStorage'. Make sure it exists and that its name is spelled
correctly.

I'm using Access 2003 but the file format is Access 2000.

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200608/1

Aug 6 '06 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
No need to respond. I could see the link in the dbWindow. Once I deleted it,
the error disappeared.

rdemyan wrote:
>I'm getting the following error message both when opening and closing my dB.

The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table or query
'MSysAccessStorage'. Make sure it exists and that its name is spelled
correctly.

I'm using Access 2003 but the file format is Access 2000.
--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200608/1

Aug 6 '06 #2

P: n/a
"rdemyan via AccessMonster.com" <u6836@uwewrote in
news:645ed12ee8549@uwe:
rdemyan wrote:
>>I'm getting the following error message both when opening and
closing my dB.

The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table or
query 'MSysAccessStorage'. Make sure it exists and that its name
is spelled correctly.

I'm using Access 2003 but the file format is Access 2000.

No need to respond. I could see the link in the dbWindow. Once I
deleted it, the error disappeared.
What is it with all these people who post prematurely?

I post far fewer posts than I start, because very often in the
process of writing up and explaining my problem, and explaining how
to make it happen, I discover how to fix it.

I truly wish those who post would take as much care in writing their
posts. I already have a rule that I ignore any thread where the
original poster responds to himself.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Aug 6 '06 #3

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David W. Fenton wrote:
What is it with all these people who post prematurely?
I truly wish those who post would take as much care in writing their
posts. I already have a rule that I ignore any thread where the
original poster responds to himself.
In most examples of this I agree. But I find it more wasteful when I see a poster respond
to their own issue with a "Nevermind - I fixed it." with no elaboration on the solution,
which most likely is a problem others are experiencing.

Frustrating when those turn up in your (Goggle) search.

I've seen some of the regulars post an issue and then respond to it with very detailed
explanations that are really helpful for others. jmtc...

--
'---------------
'John Mishefske
'---------------
Aug 8 '06 #4

P: n/a
I hear what you guys are saying, but is it reasonable on your part to assume
that after I post I'm not to continue to search for an answer?

I actually thought I was practicing good manners by posting that I had found
the answer. To my mind such a post means that responders don't need to waste
their precious time trying to respond to my post.

Would you prefer that I not respond that I found the answer? I guess, to
John's point, there is the advantage in that your response would be
educational for the next person who reads the post or might provide me with
an alternative.

I'm certainly willing to abide by any protocols that are typical of these
forums. But I really thought that I was being respectful of other people's
time by giving them a heads up that I didn't need the help any more. But
again, John makes a good point and if a response helps others, then next time
I won't post that I found the answer.

Cheers.

John Mishefske wrote:
>What is it with all these people who post prematurely?
I truly wish those who post would take as much care in writing their
posts. I already have a rule that I ignore any thread where the
original poster responds to himself.

In most examples of this I agree. But I find it more wasteful when I see a poster respond
to their own issue with a "Nevermind - I fixed it." with no elaboration on the solution,
which most likely is a problem others are experiencing.

Frustrating when those turn up in your (Goggle) search.

I've seen some of the regulars post an issue and then respond to it with very detailed
explanations that are really helpful for others. jmtc...
--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200608/1

Aug 9 '06 #5

P: n/a
John Mishefske wrote:
In most examples of this I agree. But I find it more wasteful when I see a poster respond
to their own issue with a "Nevermind - I fixed it." with no elaboration on the solution,
which most likely is a problem others are experiencing.
Is this more wasteful than the "Thank you, that fixed it" response to
the weakest of five posted solutions?
If yours is one of the other four (or even if it's not) what then?
Pass on, on the grounds that explaining why the chosen solution is
inferior or inefficient or dangerous or likely to create other problems
requires too much effort?
Pass on, on the grounds that the original poster, having got "the"
answer is unlikely to come here again until he/she has another problem?
Pass on, on the grounds that challenging the chosen answer will look
like sour grapes;
Pass on, on the grounds that challenging the chosen answer could result
in a series of disagreeable exchanges between you and the chosen
answer's poster or others?
Pass on, on the grounds that eventually when challenging the chosen
answer, one will be wrong; why risk it?
or
Challenge the chosen answer on the grounds that the archives of the
group represent a significant body of knowledge, accessible through
Google searches and leech sites such as the one through which the OP
here posts, and regulars should do as much as possible to maintain the
solutions and ideas included in these archives as efficient, correct
and effective models for Access as it currently exists?

Aug 9 '06 #6

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