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Recommended Reading/Self tuition

P: n/a
Hi

I'm based in the UK and I've drifted into Access from building a simple db
for myself, to then being asked to build a simple db for someone else, to now
spending time building increasingly more sophisticated (for me)databases.

So far my learning curve has been based upon a handleful of books and this
forum (which I think is fantastic and the level of help and knowledge sharing
has astounded me). Aside from the very basic dummies access style books I've
read Wrox: Beginning Access 2002 VBA and Designing Relational Database
Systems (Microsoft Programming Series) .

Most of my builds to date have been fairly straight forward ACC2000 or
ACC2002/3, using DAO, for individual users or small teams. I was going to
start looking at ADO but reading some threads it seems that whilst this has
its uses it is not as developed as DAO and is unlikely to be developed any
further. At this moment in time I also do not feel the need to start on SQL.

I wish to further my knowledge and skill but do not have much in the way of
funding so I thought I would ask you good folk as to a recommended reading
list, be it books or websites. I've heard several references to an 'access
handbook' but have no further details on this.
Thanks again

Darren

--
Darren

Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200606/1
Jun 8 '06 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
darren via AccessMonster.com wrote:
Hi

I'm based in the UK and I've drifted into Access from building a simple db
for myself, to then being asked to build a simple db for someone else, to now
spending time building increasingly more sophisticated (for me)databases.

So far my learning curve has been based upon a handleful of books and this
forum (which I think is fantastic and the level of help and knowledge sharing
has astounded me). Aside from the very basic dummies access style books I've
read Wrox: Beginning Access 2002 VBA and Designing Relational Database
Systems (Microsoft Programming Series) .

Most of my builds to date have been fairly straight forward ACC2000 or
ACC2002/3, using DAO, for individual users or small teams. I was going to
start looking at ADO but reading some threads it seems that whilst this has
its uses it is not as developed as DAO and is unlikely to be developed any
further. At this moment in time I also do not feel the need to start on SQL.

I wish to further my knowledge and skill but do not have much in the way of
funding so I thought I would ask you good folk as to a recommended reading
list, be it books or websites. I've heard several references to an 'access
handbook' but have no further details on this.
Thanks again

Darren

--
Darren

Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200606/1


MSDN is a powerful resource. It's free.

For instance, it has a new MDAC page:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/data/learning/MDAC/

Here's a quote:

"What is ADO?

ActiveX Data Objects (ADO) is a simple data access technology that can
used from Visual Basic, ASP, and Jscript (ADO can be used from C++,
although this is a less common scenario). Behind the scenes, ADO is
built on top of the OLEDB interfaces-giving the flexibility OLEDB's
data source-agnostic programming model to ADO developers. For an
introduction to ADO programming, see ADO Fundamentals.

Which interface is right for me?

Since ODBC and OLEDB cannot be used directly from scripting languages,
if your application needs data access from Visual Basic or a scripting
language such as VBScript, you should use ADO....."

If you go to that site, you will see links to much other useful
information.
*******
As time goes forward, rather than backward and there are rumours,
(suppressed here in CDMA) that the previous century ended several years
ago, you might want to type "MS-Access 2007" into your search bar and
read everything that comes up. You could also download the Beta version
of Office 2007 and experiment with that. Very little has been said here
in CDMA about Access 2007. I don't know why. Perhaps, it's the shock
caused by finding ADO firmly entrenched there, and the discomfort of
dealing with "!!The Ribbon!!"
*******
If you want to know everything there was to know about Access and
Databases in 1998 do a similar web search for "Access MVP", seek
out these experts and visit their websites. There are many works of art
in these sites, done by the old masters.
*******
If you are sincere about becoming proficient with Databases I'd
suggest that you start by borrowing some beginning texts on set theory
and logic from your local library and reading them, too. Without some
grounding in these areas, developers are forever grasping at concepts.
*******
And stop using sites which prey on the expertise of others; sooner or
later you will lose out on someone's valuable opinion because many of
the best developers are not fond of being exploited.

Jun 8 '06 #2

P: n/a
Dive into the "Access xxxx Developer's Handbook" (1 volume through Access
97, 2 volumes from there on). Authors Litwind, Getz and Gilbert.

xxxx=version, such as Access 2000 Developer's Handbook. don't know if it's
kept updating with Access 2000, 2003, but frankly any version would offer a
lot, since much of what you use constantly has remained fairly stable.
Jun 8 '06 #3

P: n/a
Thanks both, I value your feedback.

Wouldn't like to think that sites like this exploit the pro's, but I think it
is a reflection upon the the vast gaps in some of the literature. For
instance reading, Beginning Access 2002 VBA, I found it very interesting but
wasn't when and why you would use half the stuff. A year on I have found its
uses but they still omit valuable tips that sites like this provide. (e.g.
just because something can be done, doesn't mean it should). More importantly
the books never seem to address what to do when things go wrong or not as
expected. I guess they help bring experience into the equation.

Whilst sometimes a forum answer is welcome, I'm happy most the time being
pointed in the right direction to search for an answer. I find this approach
leads to greater learning. Anyway....

Just ordered "Database design for mere mortals" and the "Access Developers
Handbooks".

Have visited the Access MVP site a few times. I have also used the MSDN site
a few times but find the searches frustrating. That said when found the
results are quite helpful.

I was looking at the Office 2007 Beta details the other day. I would love to
get to grips with this and take a step into the now, however, my users have
only just made the break to 2003! (and some are still on older versions)

--
Darren

Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com
Jun 9 '06 #4

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