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Access 2007 Custom Menu Bars

P: n/a
I've been clicking around Access 2007 Beta 2 and can't see the custom
menu bar designer. Is it in the beta? Maybe I'm blind. The question
that comes to mind is: Will custom menu bars be the same height as they
were in previous versions or will they be the "ribbon" style that takes
up a huge portion of the screen?

Also when I use Access 2007 to open an Access 2003 database that has
custom menu bars they display as they did in Access 2003. If I convert
this same database to the Access 2007 format the custom menu bars seem
to be lost and don't display.

Given that the final version would hopefully be able to convert the
custom menu bars of earlier versions, if they are the ribbon style,
this will spell trouble for any forms designed for full or near full
screen display ie. they won't fit the screen with the ribbon style menu
bar taking up the space that it does.

Jun 1 '06 #1
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27 Replies


P: n/a
Hi, Wayne.
I've been clicking around Access 2007 Beta 2 and can't see the custom
menu bar designer. Is it in the beta?
Kinda. One can customize the Quick Access Toolbar by adding built-in
commands, but no custom commands.

Select the Office button in the top left corner of the screen, then select
the "Access Options" button on the bottom right of the pop-up window to open
the Access Options dialog window.

Select the "Customization" navigation menu item on the left, then select the
"Choose commands from" combo box and select from the menus or sections that
contain the functions you want. Select an item in the list, then select the
"Add > >" button to add it to the toolbar.

When you're done adding the buttons you'd like, select the "OK" button to
close the window. You also have the option of placing the Quick Access
Toolbar above or below the UI ribbon.
Will custom menu bars be the same height as they
were in previous versions
The Quick Access Toolbar appears to me to be the same height, but one cannot
create custom menu bars (CommandBars) in Access 2007 database format.
or will they be the "ribbon" style that takes
up a huge portion of the screen?
One can build custom UI ribbons for the Office 2007 applications by writing
code. XML code. Really.
If I convert
this same database to the Access 2007 format the custom menu bars seem
to be lost and don't display.
Access 2007 database format doesn't support CommandBars. CommandBars have
been replaced throughout the Office 2007 applications with the UI ribbon.
Given that the final version would hopefully be able to convert the
custom menu bars of earlier versions
The final version isn't going to make this easier. If you want to "convert"
your custom CommandBars from the earlier versions, you'll either have to
manually add the buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar, or you'll have to
write the XML code for your own custom UI ribbons.
they won't fit the screen with the ribbon style menu
bar taking up the space that it does.
Oh, that. See the tabs at the top of the UI ribbon? Home, Create, External
Data, Database Tools, et cetera? Double-click on any one of the tabs.
Squeeze. Double-click on one of the tabs again. Expand. Convenient, huh?
That makes up for Microsoft's claims that Access 2007 is designed to be
easier for Access developers, doesn't it? ;-)

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@u72g2000cwu.googlegro ups.com... I've been clicking around Access 2007 Beta 2 and can't see the custom
menu bar designer. Is it in the beta? Maybe I'm blind. The question
that comes to mind is: Will custom menu bars be the same height as they
were in previous versions or will they be the "ribbon" style that takes
up a huge portion of the screen?

Also when I use Access 2007 to open an Access 2003 database that has
custom menu bars they display as they did in Access 2003. If I convert
this same database to the Access 2007 format the custom menu bars seem
to be lost and don't display.

Given that the final version would hopefully be able to convert the
custom menu bars of earlier versions, if they are the ribbon style,
this will spell trouble for any forms designed for full or near full
screen display ie. they won't fit the screen with the ribbon style menu
bar taking up the space that it does.

Jun 1 '06 #2

P: n/a
As pointed out, if you want old style menus, you have to keep your database
in 2003 (or earlier) format.

The new system allows you to build ribbons, but menus are gone.

I plan on writing a converter, but my "to do" list is rather large right
now.......
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Jun 1 '06 #3

P: n/a
Thanks for the feedback.

I find it frustrating that custom menu bars will no longer be an
option. I use them extensively in my applications. As for being able
to design custom ribbons, unless I misunderstand, I'll be forced to
sacrifice a huge amount of screen real estate to a ribbon that may only
contain a couple of items. I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many "menu items" it contains.

Jun 1 '06 #4

P: n/a
Hi, Wayne.
I find it frustrating that custom menu bars will no longer be an
option.
If it's a built-in function, then you can always add it to the Quick Access
Toolbar, but if you have custom functions, then you'll have to write XML
code.
As for being able
to design custom ribbons, unless I misunderstand, I'll be forced to
sacrifice a huge amount of screen real estate to a ribbon that may only
contain a couple of items.
Well, if they're built-in functions, then place those buttons on the Quick
Access Toolbar and squeeze the UI ribbon to minimum height.
I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many "menu items" it contains.
I suspect you're right. Standardization and all that.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@i40g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com... Thanks for the feedback.

I find it frustrating that custom menu bars will no longer be an
option. I use them extensively in my applications. As for being able
to design custom ribbons, unless I misunderstand, I'll be forced to
sacrifice a huge amount of screen real estate to a ribbon that may only
contain a couple of items. I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many "menu items" it contains.

Jun 1 '06 #5

P: n/a
>I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many "menu items" it contains.

I just don't know the above yet.........

If I can shrink it down in size, then I certainly use the feature more. For
my existing applications, likely they will stay in a2003.

However, if the ribbon can be sized down a bit, then I will certainly use
them, and move my menus to it....

I *often* wanted something larger then tool bars...but, not quite as large
as the ribbon is now!

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Jun 1 '06 #6

P: n/a
Wayne wrote:
I've been clicking around Access 2007 Beta 2 and can't see the custom
menu bar designer. Is it in the beta? Maybe I'm blind. The question
that comes to mind is: Will custom menu bars be the same height as they
were in previous versions or will they be the "ribbon" style that takes
up a huge portion of the screen?

Also when I use Access 2007 to open an Access 2003 database that has
custom menu bars they display as they did in Access 2003. If I convert
this same database to the Access 2007 format the custom menu bars seem
to be lost and don't display.

Given that the final version would hopefully be able to convert the
custom menu bars of earlier versions, if they are the ribbon style,
this will spell trouble for any forms designed for full or near full
screen display ie. they won't fit the screen with the ribbon style menu
bar taking up the space that it does.


I think one can create custom menu bars and dropdowns in code. I
haven't been able to find any ui provision for this.
And my efforts are still very clumsy. Regardless this adds a
menu-command visible by selecting add-ins which pops up the message
"loop".
The whole thing requires mucho imnprovement:
(I haven't read all the thread and if someone has already pointed this
out, or a better way, then I'm sorry I wasted your time.)

Sub temp3()
Set myMenuBar = CommandBars.ActiveMenuBar
Set newMenu = myMenuBar.Controls.Add(Type:=msoControlPopup,
Temporary:=True)
newMenu.Caption = "Custom2"
Set ctrl1 = newMenu.CommandBar.Controls _
.Add(Type:=msoControlButton, Id:=1)
With ctrl1
.OnAction = "= tempfunction()"
.Caption = "Test"
.TooltipText = "Just a Test"
.Style = msoButtonCaption
End With
End Sub

Public Function tempfunction()
MsgBox "loop"
End Function

Oh, I think we need to set a reference to the Office 12 library.

Jun 1 '06 #7

P: n/a
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in
news:exxfg.218093$P01.84798@pd7tw3no:
I *often* wanted something larger then tool bars...but, not quite
as large as the ribbon is now!


I think that this is the kind of discussion that ought to be on the
Access blog in comments on posts that cover the relevant UI
components. There needs to be a way for the Access team to get this
kind of feedback from developers, and that looks like an obvious
place for it.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 1 '06 #8

P: n/a
"'69 Camaro" wrote
I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many
"menu items" it contains.


I suspect you're right. Standardization and all that.


"But," said the UI person at Microsoft, "they are _only_ the height of three
toolbars." Of course, not a single one of the Access applications I created
since 1993 have created that used even two toolbars. <SIGH! Why do I have
this nagging suspicion that those 'Softies are provided with 23" screens? >

But, of course, I guess it was important that they have room for their
larger icons that to me are just as cryptic as the smaller ones have been.

Larry Linson_
Jun 2 '06 #9

P: n/a
> I find it frustrating that custom menu bars will no longer be an
option.
If your appcation has code that creates menu bars and options, they *will*
appear. In other words, the command bars object is still avaling, and is
done so for compatibliry. the downpart is that they will appear in the
ribbon.
I'll be forced to
sacrifice a huge amount of screen real estate to a ribbon that may only
contain a couple of items. I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many "menu items" it contains.

If look at the ribbon, it is broken into tabs. If you double click on a
ribbon tab, then the ribbon hides. So, you can well easily hide the ribbon.

I don't know about changing the "height" of the ribbon just yet....
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Jun 2 '06 #10

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:yMNfg.28714$%C6.13916@trnddc08:
"'69 Camaro" wrote
I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many
"menu items" it contains.


I suspect you're right. Standardization and all that.


"But," said the UI person at Microsoft, "they are _only_ the
height of three toolbars." Of course, not a single one of the
Access applications I created since 1993 have created that used
even two toolbars. <SIGH! Why do I have this nagging suspicion
that those 'Softies are provided with 23" screens?


Hold on, there. Keep in mind that a menu and a toolbar are the same
thing, is it not the case that one menu plus one toolbar is two
toolbars?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 2 '06 #11

P: n/a
Hi, Larry.
"But," said the UI person at Microsoft, "they are _only_ the height of
three toolbars."
He's full of it. Measure the UI ribbon next to the menu bars and toolbars
from an earlier version of Access. The title bar and UI ribbon are
equivalent to the title bar, built-in menu bar, and four toolbars in height.
Subtract the height of the title bar, and that leaves the height of five
CommandBars total for that UI ribbon. Hardly three toolbars.

It's really noticeable for those of us who generally only have the built-in
menu bar and one toolbar showing. From the top of my screen to the bottom
of the UI ribbon, it's now 1/4 of my screen real estate unavailable as
working space unless I can collapse the UI ribbon. When a table is open in
Design View, almost four rows are available for adding field names. A bit
of a squeeze. Can I just maximize the table? No. Got no maximize button
to press. I've got to collapse the UI ribbon, and then shove the navigation
pane all the way to the left to get most of the screen for my table.
<SIGH! Why do I have this nagging suspicion that those 'Softies are
provided with 23" screens? >
That and given the fact that they've got good enough eyesight to use high
resolutions, and their screen real estate sacrificed to the UI ribbon isn't
much.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in message
news:yMNfg.28714$%C6.13916@trnddc08... "'69 Camaro" wrote
I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
the standard height irrespective of how many
"menu items" it contains.


I suspect you're right. Standardization and all that.


"But," said the UI person at Microsoft, "they are _only_ the height of
three toolbars." Of course, not a single one of the Access applications I
created since 1993 have created that used even two toolbars. <SIGH! Why do
I have this nagging suspicion that those 'Softies are provided with 23"
screens? >

But, of course, I guess it was important that they have room for their
larger icons that to me are just as cryptic as the smaller ones have been.

Larry Linson_

Jun 3 '06 #12

P: n/a
The "tabs" take the space that the main menu line would take. The ribbon is
below the tabs, and Gunny has pointed out other apparent anomalies to the
"just three toolbars" statement.

Larry
"David W. Fenton" <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@127.0.0. 1...
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:yMNfg.28714$%C6.13916@trnddc08:
"'69 Camaro" wrote
>> I'm assuming that the ribbon will remain at
>> the standard height irrespective of how many
>> "menu items" it contains.
>
> I suspect you're right. Standardization and all that.


"But," said the UI person at Microsoft, "they are _only_ the
height of three toolbars." Of course, not a single one of the
Access applications I created since 1993 have created that used
even two toolbars. <SIGH! Why do I have this nagging suspicion
that those 'Softies are provided with 23" screens?


Hold on, there. Keep in mind that a menu and a toolbar are the same
thing, is it not the case that one menu plus one toolbar is two
toolbars?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

Jun 3 '06 #13

P: n/a
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote
If look at the ribbon, it is broken into tabs.
If you double click on a ribbon tab, then
the ribbon hides. So, you can well easily
hide the ribbon.
You can hide most things, one way or another, but I don't _have_ to take
that extra step (those extra steps?), now.
I don't know about changing the "height" of the ribbon just yet....


Yes, I don't know about that, either.

Larry
Jun 3 '06 #14

P: n/a
I use custom menubars or commandbars or whatever the correct
terminology is extensively. I've just opened an Access 2003 database
in Access 2007 that uses a custom menubar in the reports.

Now, instead of having a neat space-efficient menubar with 4 items on
it ie. Close Report, Send As Email Attachment, Save As Snapshot and
Print, I have the ribbon with these 4 items at the top and a heap of
wasted screen real estate below.

This just doesn't seem to make any sense. I can see advantages with
the ribbon in general, but why have they taken away the ability to
easily create custom menu bars. Do we really want to be forced to
write XML code to create a custom menubar? Is this making things
easier for the end user? Hardly.

Another question that comes to mind is this: If the new ribbon is the
be all and end all of a better user interface, why haven't they used it
in Outlook? There seems to be no consistency here.

Jun 3 '06 #15

P: n/a
Hi, Wayne.
why have they taken away the ability to
easily create custom menu bars.
As Lyle corrected me elsethread, one may add custom CommandBars in Access
2007 via VBA code. They show up on the Add-ins UI ribbon.
Do we really want to be forced to
write XML code to create a custom menubar?
We'll have to write XML code to customize UI ribbons, but we can write VBA
code that we're all familiar with for custom CommandBars on the Add-ins UI
ribbon. The problem with that is it takes longer to write, test, and
maintain the code for this than it did by just dragging and dropping the
"Custom" button on a CommandBar and modifying that in the GUI.
Is this making things
easier for the end user?
In Microsoft's eyes, yes. The Access usability tests with beginning- and
intermediate- level Excel users pinpointed the things they struggled with,
so the UI ribbon has been designed with them in mind. The Lead Program
Manager on the Access team stated that as they added things for the end
users, the developers got excited about them, too. Basically, what's good
for Excel users is good for Access developers, too.

The more I explore Access 2007 and the more I read on Microsoft's site, the
more I suspect that Microsoft believes that an Access developer is an Excel
user who needs Access as a go-between for the "real" data source and Excel,
and just wants to do a few point-and-clicks and to just start typing --
without any understanding of how to normalize the tables, let alone how to
build a database application.
Another question that comes to mind is this: If the new ribbon is the
be all and end all of a better user interface, why haven't they used it
in Outlook?
Sometimes they run out of time during development and have to move some
features into the next release.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@h76g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...I use custom menubars or commandbars or whatever the correct
terminology is extensively. I've just opened an Access 2003 database
in Access 2007 that uses a custom menubar in the reports.

Now, instead of having a neat space-efficient menubar with 4 items on
it ie. Close Report, Send As Email Attachment, Save As Snapshot and
Print, I have the ribbon with these 4 items at the top and a heap of
wasted screen real estate below.

This just doesn't seem to make any sense. I can see advantages with
the ribbon in general, but why have they taken away the ability to
easily create custom menu bars. Do we really want to be forced to
write XML code to create a custom menubar? Is this making things
easier for the end user? Hardly.

Another question that comes to mind is this: If the new ribbon is the
be all and end all of a better user interface, why haven't they used it
in Outlook? There seems to be no consistency here.

Jun 3 '06 #16

P: n/a
Wayne wrote:
This just doesn't seem to make any sense. I can see advantages with
the ribbon in general, but why have they taken away the ability to
easily create custom menu bars.


I don't know if this is easy but the Quick Access Toolbar seems to be
responsive to Macros . In Customization we can add macros to the Quick
Access ToolBar.

Jun 3 '06 #17

P: n/a
Can one still create custom shortcut menus?

Can one turn the ribbons off entirely?

If both are yes, then I would just start building menus that are accessed via a
clickable menu label on each form and stop using command bars in the main window
entirely.

I struggle to get some of my forms to fit on some user's screens with just one
menu bar and one toolbar. That ribbon would force half my user-base to buy new
displays.

It's also possible to create a wide, short, borderless form that looks and acts
(pretty much) like a command bar. Big problem with those is that they are not
"dockable".

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Jun 3 '06 #18

P: n/a
Rick Brandt wrote:
Can one still create custom shortcut menus? Yes. So far I have found that one can do this in code and in
Customization by using Macros or Built-in Commands. (For the beginner
etc, I can point out that one can run code, or do just about anything
from a Macro.)
Can one turn the ribbons off entirely?

Yes in a application developed in a previous version.
Not yet and perhaps not ever in a pure Access 2007 application. I have
a Northwind with just the Northwind Custom Toolbar showing in Access
2007. I can accomplish this in the Customization dialogs.

Please, don't infer I like or support this. I'm just exploring.

Jun 3 '06 #19

P: n/a
BTW, this is a VERY Beta. When I mess with the Access 2007 Ribbon it
sometimes opens a second instance of Access which takes and will not
relinquish 99% of CPU usage; also sometimes memory seems to leak into
the video sphere as bank rectangles appear on my screnn and the window
for other applications become blank. Those without a high tolerance for
rebooting may wish to take this into consideration.

Jun 3 '06 #20

P: n/a
After reading
the two parts of
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/ms4...ffice.12).aspx
and experimenting with same
I think we will become easily familiar with customizing the Ribbon over
time and find it to be useful.

Jun 3 '06 #21

P: n/a
"'69 Camaro" <Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM>
wrote in news:nv******************************@adelphia.com :
The more I explore Access 2007 and the more I read on Microsoft's
site, the more I suspect that Microsoft believes that an Access
developer is an Excel user who needs Access as a go-between for
the "real" data source and Excel, and just wants to do a few
point-and-clicks and to just start typing -- without any
understanding of how to normalize the tables, let alone how to
build a database application.


Then it seems to me that it's important that the people in this
discussion in this newsgroup weigh in on this subject in the
comments on the Access blog to make sure that somebody has a chance
of getting the message that the Excel approach is badly mistaken for
a large population of Access developers.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 3 '06 #22

P: n/a
>Sometimes they run out of time during development and have to move some
features into the next release.


This is probably true, but if they don't have time to standardize the
interface of what is being touted as a major upgrade to Office, what
hope is there of an Office suite that isn't full of bugs? It's not as
if the software is exactly cheap. Roll on the endless service releases!

Jun 3 '06 #23

P: n/a
Hi, David.
Then it seems to me that it's important that the people in this
discussion in this newsgroup weigh in on this subject in the
comments on the Access blog
I plan to. I'm making my list. I'm focusing first on things that reduce
developers' productivity, but I'm including the things I like as well,
because there _are_ some nifty things about Access 2007 -- but so far I
haven't found anything quite nifty enough to compel me to purchase Office
2007 Pro at $500 for each computer in my office.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"David W. Fenton" <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@127.0.0. 1... "'69 Camaro" <Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM>
wrote in news:nv******************************@adelphia.com :
The more I explore Access 2007 and the more I read on Microsoft's
site, the more I suspect that Microsoft believes that an Access
developer is an Excel user who needs Access as a go-between for
the "real" data source and Excel, and just wants to do a few
point-and-clicks and to just start typing -- without any
understanding of how to normalize the tables, let alone how to
build a database application.


Then it seems to me that it's important that the people in this
discussion in this newsgroup weigh in on this subject in the
comments on the Access blog to make sure that somebody has a chance
of getting the message that the Excel approach is badly mistaken for
a large population of Access developers.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/

Jun 4 '06 #24

P: n/a
Hi, Wayne.
if they don't have time to standardize the
interface of what is being touted as a major upgrade to Office, what
hope is there of an Office suite that isn't full of bugs?


The standardization of the interface wasn't as important as making sure that
key features worked, so while we can expect bugs after it's released, it
won't be as buggy as it would have been if they'd spent the time on the
interface instead of fixing bugs.

HTH.
Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@h76g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
Sometimes they run out of time during development and have to move some
features into the next release.


This is probably true, but if they don't have time to standardize the
interface of what is being touted as a major upgrade to Office, what
hope is there of an Office suite that isn't full of bugs? It's not as
if the software is exactly cheap. Roll on the endless service releases!

Jun 4 '06 #25

P: n/a
"Wayne" <cq*******@volcanomail.com> wrote in
news:11**********************@h76g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com:
Sometimes they run out of time during development and have to move
some features into the next release.


This is probably true, but if they don't have time to standardize
the interface of what is being touted as a major upgrade to
Office, what hope is there of an Office suite that isn't full of
bugs? It's not as if the software is exactly cheap. Roll on the
endless service releases!


Uh, why did you paste that quotation into a followup to a message by
me that didn't have that text in it?

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 4 '06 #26

P: n/a
"'69 Camaro" <Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM>
wrote in news:D8******************************@adelphia.com :
"David W. Fenton" <XX*******@dfenton.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@127.0.0. 1...
Then it seems to me that it's important that the people in this
discussion in this newsgroup weigh in on this subject in the
comments on the Access blog


I plan to. I'm making my list. . . .


Er, the Access blog is up and running and there are posts there
about the topics that people have been discussing here.

I reviewed all the comments and nobody has criticized the aspects of
the ribbon that have been criticized here. There's also a
fundamental lack of understanding among the comment thread
participants of the downside of ADPs and the issues regarding Jet
and linked tables in MDBs. What is *very* clear is that ADPs are
dead -- the Access team no longer recommends using them with SQL
Server. But there are still people who are scared of Jet, believing
it can't do the job. I don't know why these people prefer the
incorrect guesses about what data you want that ADO makes to the
incorrect guesses that Jet sometimes makes, but they seem to prefer
them. I think it's probably due to irrational dislike of Jet, but I
have no proof of that.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
Jun 4 '06 #27

P: n/a
Hi '69 Camaro.
The standardization of the interface wasn't as important as making sure that
key features worked, so while we can expect bugs after it's released, it
won't be as buggy as it would have been if they'd spent the time on the
interface instead of fixing bugs.


I understand what you're saying, but isn't it a bit like if General
Motors released a new model and because they had to spend lots of time
ironing out bugs with the engine they were unable to update the
frontend of the body, so the new model is released with an all new body
except that the grille, headlights etc are the same as the previous
model.

This sticks out like a sore thumb but they figure the buying public
will understand that in their rush to get the new model on to the
streets they didn't have time to finish the new body work.

The motoring buying public wouldn't accept it. The reason they
wouldn't accept it is because in the auto industry there is such a
thing as competition.

As we know it's a Microsoft world and, although some may disagree,
Office has no real competition in the business world. Hence they can
release something that obviously isn't finished and not only get away
with it, but have people justify their position. ;-)

As far as the number of bugs we can expect, let's hope they have it
sorted out by service pack 3.

Jun 4 '06 #28

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