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Intellectual property: The foundation of A L L human prosperity.

P: n/a
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

Thinking about going into business? Have an idea that you think will
change the world? What if you were told that there was no way you
could prevent someone from stealing your idea [especially important if
your idea is successful] and exploiting it to make a profit? What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn’t be sure that your ideas would be protected?
Enter intellectual property rights. Intellectual property plays a
major role in the creation of businesses and prosperity because it
creates a culture that fosters the freedom to tap into one’s
imagination and creative potential.

Wikipedia defines intellectual property as “various legal entitlements
which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other
intangibles in their expressed form. The holder of this legal
entitlement is generally entitled to exercise various exclusive rights
in relation to the subject matter of the IP. The term intellectual
property reflects the idea that this subject matter is the product of
the mind or the intellect, and that IP rights may be protected by law
in the same way as any other form of property.”

The crucial thing to understand is that intellectual property is
property, and private property is protected because it is the
foundation for liberty. Dr. Lee Reed, Professor in the Terry College
of Business at the University of Georgia, has phrased it this way:
“property and liberty mean the same thing.” He cites William
Blackstone, the famous English jurist, teacher and author of The
Commentaries on the Laws of England; John Locke, the political
philosopher whose theories greatly influenced the American Founders;
and James Madison, often dubbed “the Father of the Constitution” as
support for this notion that private property is absolutely
indispensable in any kind of consideration of liberty.

Property rights are not only essential for freedom, but also for
economic prosperity. It has been well-documented that there is a
strong, positive correlation between the strength of property rights
protection and the economic affluence of a country. As the world moves
forward in trying to relieve international poverty and stimulate the
global economy, private property rights, including intellectual
property protection, is going to have to be a part of that discourse.
Property is productive, and it gives incentive. IP protection spurs
citizens on to creating new resources—and thereby promoting the
economy.

If property is not protected, then freedom does not exist because the
fundamental premise of freedom is that you are able to do what it is
that you want with that which is yours; obviously the only caveat
being that what you want to do with your property cannot be to impinge
on the concordant right of others.

However, in the specific case of intellectual property, the
consequences of not protecting them are even more dire. If
intellectual property rights are not respected, critical elements of a
vibrant, productive economy are stripped away—creativity, imagination,
innovation and the desire and ability to compete. Those in societies
where intellectual property is disregarded are robbed of viable
outlets for their inventive gifts and the respect of who they are and
what they contribute to their world is withheld.

Everyone benefits from intellectual property protection. The economy
is constantly advancing, transforming as new ideas are thought up,
fresh products challenge the industry’s incumbents and everyone is
given the freedom to pursue that which they have been gifted to
pursue—without fear of piracy, theft or counterfeiting. Governments
and individuals alike can flourish and prosper when not just IP rights
but private property rights in general are upheld and safeguarded.

It’s fairly simple and straightforward once one expends a minimal
amount of mental energy as to why intellectual property is considered
to be so important. Yet as of April 26, I hadn’t given much thought to
it at all. Incidentally, April 26 is “World Intellectual Property Day”
and the Institute for Policy Innovation hosted an event in honor of
that. I attended and had my mind blown by what a fundamental
consideration property rights truly were, and why intellectual
property should be included among the things that are considered
essential ingredients for a free, prosperous and competitive economy.

In fact, most of the ideas that have been disseminated in this column
stem from the speakers I heard at IPI’s event. I was convinced in one
fell swoop that IP is something worth pursuing, establishing and
defending—particularly in countries that are struggling to cultivate
economies that satisfy and succeed.

Simply coercing governments to implement IP protection legislation
isn’t the answer; simple answers are hard to ascertain in tricky
policy issues. The answer will have to be a cultural battle that is
won—the individual citizens must be convinced that IP is in their best
interest. The local citizens must want IP protection if it is to be
truly instituted. At the same time, governments must be held
accountable if piracy runs rampant within their borders. In this
global economy, it is vital that IP is presented for what it truly is:
not a Western conception, not an American ideal—but a component of
property, a pillar of freedom and a necessary facet of true
prosperity.

There are many organizations, like IPI, leading the fight in IP
education and IP training – not just for governments, but for the
residents who are greatly affected as well. As countries develop,
solid groundwork for freedom will need to be laid in order to ensure
sustained economic growth and prosperity.

Freedom works…but it’s takes a lot of work.
May 17 '06 #1
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15 Replies


P: n/a
Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com> wrote in
news:s7********************************@4ax.com:
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn’t be sure that your ideas would be protected?


Altruism? The joy of creation?

I posted something creative (I THINK) today, Lauren, about ADPs acting like
MDBs. Know why I don't have to guard it, copyright it,, stamp it forever
with a Scarlet FFDBA? One of the reasons, Lauren, is that I will have a
better idea tomorrow. No one can steal my creativity, my initiative because
it's always new; it is what I am now; it is what I will be tomorrow; anyone
can have and is welcome to what I was yesterday.

These ideas that you promote are nonsense, advanced by the intellectually
bankrupt who have so few ideas that they fear the loss of any, the theft of
any. Perhaps, one can't afford to lose an idea if one fears that it is
his/her last.

--
Lyle Fairfield
May 17 '06 #2

P: n/a
While I applaud your views Lyle, what about the real issues of feeding the
family, or having funds to delve further into new ideas. Creativity doesn't
put food in the mouths of your children, or your self. Personally, I would
love to have the ability to be creative and not give a damn about money, but
I haven't figured out how to do this as yet.

Money sucks, but unless my lifestyle is devoid of any materialism and I am
happy to live in the bush, eat only what I find, and just die if I get sick,
how do I survive without money.

To be creative you need time. To have free time, after hunting down your
next meal, you need to be efficient which requires someone to think about
and come up with better ideas to be more efficient. In other words, to be
creative. They are intertwined.

In our society we need money. I believe we are stuck with IP laws and the
need for them so we can be creative.

Just my few thoughts, though it would be nice to not have to worry about all
this crap.

Jeff Pritchard
________________
Asken Research Pty. Ltd.
Access Database Developers
http://www.asken.com.au

"Lyle Fairfield" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:Xn*********************************@216.221.8 1.119...
Lauren Wilson <pr*****@private.com> wrote in
news:s7********************************@4ax.com:
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn't be sure that your ideas would be protected?


Altruism? The joy of creation?

I posted something creative (I THINK) today, Lauren, about ADPs acting
like
MDBs. Know why I don't have to guard it, copyright it,, stamp it forever
with a Scarlet FFDBA? One of the reasons, Lauren, is that I will have a
better idea tomorrow. No one can steal my creativity, my initiative
because
it's always new; it is what I am now; it is what I will be tomorrow;
anyone
can have and is welcome to what I was yesterday.

These ideas that you promote are nonsense, advanced by the intellectually
bankrupt who have so few ideas that they fear the loss of any, the theft
of
any. Perhaps, one can't afford to lose an idea if one fears that it is
his/her last.

--
Lyle Fairfield

May 17 '06 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 16 May 2006 21:25:59 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:

<clip>
In our company we don't worry about IP because it is owned by the
companies we work for: once you have paid the bills, the source code
is yours, and I have no right to use it in the next project. Of
course you can't blame me to use my increased knowledge in that next
project.

Another point: a company approached us for a significant development
project. They wanted to be sure they could patent the app. I told
them they would have to worry at least as much not to infringe on
other people's patents. Of which there are many thousands. Go pay
your lawyers until they've had enough...

Personally I think the US patent system is out of control. As
long as companies like Disney can lobby congress to extend their IP
rights semi-indefinitely, or as long as bio-engineering firms can
patent a gene sequence: give me a break.

-Tom.

May 17 '06 #4

P: n/a

Bottom line:

"Property is individual man's life and all non-procreative derivatives
of his life. 'Property' is the supreme subject of volition, just as
'energy' is the supreme subject of physics." --A. J. Galambos

Protecting property, and ESPECIALLY intellectual property, is the
single most noble function of ANY genteel civilization. In fact, it
is OBJECTIVELY noble -- because failure to protect it results in
murderous debacles like the Soviet Union.

================================================== ========
On Tue, 16 May 2006 21:25:59 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

Thinking about going into business? Have an idea that you think will
change the world? What if you were told that there was no way you
could prevent someone from stealing your idea [especially important if
your idea is successful] and exploiting it to make a profit? What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn’t be sure that your ideas would be protected?
Enter intellectual property rights. Intellectual property plays a
major role in the creation of businesses and prosperity because it
creates a culture that fosters the freedom to tap into one’s
imagination and creative potential.

Wikipedia defines intellectual property as “various legal entitlements
which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other
intangibles in their expressed form. The holder of this legal
entitlement is generally entitled to exercise various exclusive rights
in relation to the subject matter of the IP. The term intellectual
property reflects the idea that this subject matter is the product of
the mind or the intellect, and that IP rights may be protected by law
in the same way as any other form of property.”

The crucial thing to understand is that intellectual property is
property, and private property is protected because it is the
foundation for liberty. Dr. Lee Reed, Professor in the Terry College
of Business at the University of Georgia, has phrased it this way:
“property and liberty mean the same thing.” He cites William
Blackstone, the famous English jurist, teacher and author of The
Commentaries on the Laws of England; John Locke, the political
philosopher whose theories greatly influenced the American Founders;
and James Madison, often dubbed “the Father of the Constitution” as
support for this notion that private property is absolutely
indispensable in any kind of consideration of liberty.

Property rights are not only essential for freedom, but also for
economic prosperity. It has been well-documented that there is a
strong, positive correlation between the strength of property rights
protection and the economic affluence of a country. As the world moves
forward in trying to relieve international poverty and stimulate the
global economy, private property rights, including intellectual
property protection, is going to have to be a part of that discourse.
Property is productive, and it gives incentive. IP protection spurs
citizens on to creating new resources—and thereby promoting the
economy.

If property is not protected, then freedom does not exist because the
fundamental premise of freedom is that you are able to do what it is
that you want with that which is yours; obviously the only caveat
being that what you want to do with your property cannot be to impinge
on the concordant right of others.

However, in the specific case of intellectual property, the
consequences of not protecting them are even more dire. If
intellectual property rights are not respected, critical elements of a
vibrant, productive economy are stripped away—creativity, imagination,
innovation and the desire and ability to compete. Those in societies
where intellectual property is disregarded are robbed of viable
outlets for their inventive gifts and the respect of who they are and
what they contribute to their world is withheld.

Everyone benefits from intellectual property protection. The economy
is constantly advancing, transforming as new ideas are thought up,
fresh products challenge the industry’s incumbents and everyone is
given the freedom to pursue that which they have been gifted to
pursue—without fear of piracy, theft or counterfeiting. Governments
and individuals alike can flourish and prosper when not just IP rights
but private property rights in general are upheld and safeguarded.

It’s fairly simple and straightforward once one expends a minimal
amount of mental energy as to why intellectual property is considered
to be so important. Yet as of April 26, I hadn’t given much thought to
it at all. Incidentally, April 26 is “World Intellectual Property Day”
and the Institute for Policy Innovation hosted an event in honor of
that. I attended and had my mind blown by what a fundamental
consideration property rights truly were, and why intellectual
property should be included among the things that are considered
essential ingredients for a free, prosperous and competitive economy.

In fact, most of the ideas that have been disseminated in this column
stem from the speakers I heard at IPI’s event. I was convinced in one
fell swoop that IP is something worth pursuing, establishing and
defending—particularly in countries that are struggling to cultivate
economies that satisfy and succeed.

Simply coercing governments to implement IP protection legislation
isn’t the answer; simple answers are hard to ascertain in tricky
policy issues. The answer will have to be a cultural battle that is
won—the individual citizens must be convinced that IP is in their best
interest. The local citizens must want IP protection if it is to be
truly instituted. At the same time, governments must be held
accountable if piracy runs rampant within their borders. In this
global economy, it is vital that IP is presented for what it truly is:
not a Western conception, not an American ideal—but a component of
property, a pillar of freedom and a necessary facet of true
prosperity.

There are many organizations, like IPI, leading the fight in IP
education and IP training – not just for governments, but for the
residents who are greatly affected as well. As countries develop,
solid groundwork for freedom will need to be laid in order to ensure
sustained economic growth and prosperity.

Freedom works…but it’s takes a lot of work.

May 17 '06 #5

P: n/a
On Wed, 17 May 2006 05:54:40 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:

Bottom line:

"Property is individual man's life and all non-procreative derivatives
of his life. 'Property' is the supreme subject of volition, just as
'energy' is the supreme subject of physics." --A. J. Galambos
Galambos’ Theory of Volition designs a societal structure based upon
precise definitions, simple and demonstrable postulates, rigorous
logic, the quest to maximize freedom, and an allowance for the wide
variety in human desires and aspirations. The result is not the
inadequate private enterprise ballyhooed by every local Chamber of
Commerce, but a new capitalism, Capitalism III as Galambos called it.
For the first time in history, a true scientist, with a background in
astrophysics and mathematics, applies the methods of science to human
interaction, and succeeds. Originally disclosed in his lecture
series, V-50, this is the topic of Volume One of Galambos’ Book One,
Sic Itur Ad Astra.

The major reason for the heretofore inadequacies of private enterprise
was its lack of appeal for mankind’s most important individual, the
cosmological innovator. Albert Einstein was not “in it” for the
money. Indeed, private enterprisers have never even recognized that
knowledge and ideas are a form of property. Andrew Galambos rectifies
this with his Theory of Primary Property. By providing the highest of
rewards for intellectual accomplishment, Galambos designs a society in
which everyone receives what is due them, not just freedom, but an
even higher concept, Justice. Originally disclosed in the lecture
series, V-201, this is the topic of the remaining volumes of Sic Itur
Ad Astra.
Protecting property, and ESPECIALLY intellectual property, is the
single most noble function of ANY genteel civilization. In fact, it
is OBJECTIVELY noble -- because failure to protect it results in
murderous debacles like the Soviet Union.

================================================= =========
On Tue, 16 May 2006 21:25:59 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

Thinking about going into business? Have an idea that you think will
change the world? What if you were told that there was no way you
could prevent someone from stealing your idea [especially important if
your idea is successful] and exploiting it to make a profit? What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn’t be sure that your ideas would be protected?
Enter intellectual property rights. Intellectual property plays a
major role in the creation of businesses and prosperity because it
creates a culture that fosters the freedom to tap into one’s
imagination and creative potential.

Wikipedia defines intellectual property as “various legal entitlements
which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other
intangibles in their expressed form. The holder of this legal
entitlement is generally entitled to exercise various exclusive rights
in relation to the subject matter of the IP. The term intellectual
property reflects the idea that this subject matter is the product of
the mind or the intellect, and that IP rights may be protected by law
in the same way as any other form of property.”

The crucial thing to understand is that intellectual property is
property, and private property is protected because it is the
foundation for liberty. Dr. Lee Reed, Professor in the Terry College
of Business at the University of Georgia, has phrased it this way:
“property and liberty mean the same thing.” He cites William
Blackstone, the famous English jurist, teacher and author of The
Commentaries on the Laws of England; John Locke, the political
philosopher whose theories greatly influenced the American Founders;
and James Madison, often dubbed “the Father of the Constitution” as
support for this notion that private property is absolutely
indispensable in any kind of consideration of liberty.

Property rights are not only essential for freedom, but also for
economic prosperity. It has been well-documented that there is a
strong, positive correlation between the strength of property rights
protection and the economic affluence of a country. As the world moves
forward in trying to relieve international poverty and stimulate the
global economy, private property rights, including intellectual
property protection, is going to have to be a part of that discourse.
Property is productive, and it gives incentive. IP protection spurs
citizens on to creating new resources—and thereby promoting the
economy.

If property is not protected, then freedom does not exist because the
fundamental premise of freedom is that you are able to do what it is
that you want with that which is yours; obviously the only caveat
being that what you want to do with your property cannot be to impinge
on the concordant right of others.

However, in the specific case of intellectual property, the
consequences of not protecting them are even more dire. If
intellectual property rights are not respected, critical elements of a
vibrant, productive economy are stripped away—creativity, imagination,
innovation and the desire and ability to compete. Those in societies
where intellectual property is disregarded are robbed of viable
outlets for their inventive gifts and the respect of who they are and
what they contribute to their world is withheld.

Everyone benefits from intellectual property protection. The economy
is constantly advancing, transforming as new ideas are thought up,
fresh products challenge the industry’s incumbents and everyone is
given the freedom to pursue that which they have been gifted to
pursue—without fear of piracy, theft or counterfeiting. Governments
and individuals alike can flourish and prosper when not just IP rights
but private property rights in general are upheld and safeguarded.

It’s fairly simple and straightforward once one expends a minimal
amount of mental energy as to why intellectual property is considered
to be so important. Yet as of April 26, I hadn’t given much thought to
it at all. Incidentally, April 26 is “World Intellectual Property Day”
and the Institute for Policy Innovation hosted an event in honor of
that. I attended and had my mind blown by what a fundamental
consideration property rights truly were, and why intellectual
property should be included among the things that are considered
essential ingredients for a free, prosperous and competitive economy.

In fact, most of the ideas that have been disseminated in this column
stem from the speakers I heard at IPI’s event. I was convinced in one
fell swoop that IP is something worth pursuing, establishing and
defending—particularly in countries that are struggling to cultivate
economies that satisfy and succeed.

Simply coercing governments to implement IP protection legislation
isn’t the answer; simple answers are hard to ascertain in tricky
policy issues. The answer will have to be a cultural battle that is
won—the individual citizens must be convinced that IP is in their best
interest. The local citizens must want IP protection if it is to be
truly instituted. At the same time, governments must be held
accountable if piracy runs rampant within their borders. In this
global economy, it is vital that IP is presented for what it truly is:
not a Western conception, not an American ideal—but a component of
property, a pillar of freedom and a necessary facet of true
prosperity.

There are many organizations, like IPI, leading the fight in IP
education and IP training – not just for governments, but for the
residents who are greatly affected as well. As countries develop,
solid groundwork for freedom will need to be laid in order to ensure
sustained economic growth and prosperity.

Freedom works…but it’s takes a lot of work.

May 17 '06 #6

P: n/a
Welcome back, Lauren.

I'm not sure that I understand the point you're trying to make. By
plagiarizing Andrew J. Galambos's copyrighted material posted on the
following Web site:

http://www.tuspco.com
(© Copyright, 1961+, Andrew J. Galambos, et. al.
© Copyright, 1999+, The Andrew J. and Suzanne J. Galambos Natural Estate
Trust)

.. . . and by posting Daniel Son's copyrighted article in its entirety from
the following Web page:

http://www.townhall.com/opinion/colu...12/197163.html
(Copyright © 2006 Townhall.com)

.. . . likely in direct violation with Townhall.com's legal policy, which is
stated on its Web site:

http://www.townhall.com/townhall/legal.html

"6.4 General Practices Regarding Use of Platform.

"You, the Reader, agree that you, the Reader, will not:
". . . (4) mimic, reproduce, copy, edit, alter, modify, or publicly display
any information displayed on our website (except for The the the (sic)
Reader's Information), or produce derivative works from our website (other
than from The the the (sic) Reader's Information), to the extent that such
action(s) would comprise an infringement upon or otherwise violate the
intellectual property rights of TownSquare or any other third party, unless
you, you, (sic) the Reader,, acquire prior written consent of TownSquare or
the appropriate third party."

.. . . are you trying to say that attempts to protect intellectual property
are useless because people like you will just ignore IP laws? Or are you
trying to say that written ideas shouldn't be covered under current IP laws?
Or are you trying to say that our allowing you to flaunt current IP laws
"results in murderous debacles like the Soviet Union," as you put it? (If
this last one is the case then I shudder to think that our inaction might
cause deaths, but just how many debacled murders are we talking about, and
in who's neighborhood? If it's just the one plagiarist in your
neighborhood, and on your side of the street, then please forgive us while
we debate about whether it is more noble to protect copyrights than to
protect lives and, should we decide in your favor, determine exactly who
should be the noble one to come save you -- just in case we don't get there
before the coroner does.)

Or are you trying to say those of us who exercise our creative potential by
providing free answers for the benefit of people -- including you, Lauren --
who post questions regarding how to use Microsoft Access in the
comp.databases.ms-access newsgroup, should instead be spending our time in
pursuit of legal means to prevent people like you from exploiting "our"
ideas to earn a profit? Or that we should be spending our time in pursuit
of paying business opportunities, instead of helping others who don't yet
have the necessary skills to earn a living in this field, and possibly never
will unless they get significant amounts of help from experts, just like you
have so many times, year after year? In other words, you're saying that we
should only be concerned with guarding our own prosperity, which will, in
turn, automagixly increase all humans' prosperity? What a truly noble
society we live in.

Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Lauren Wilson" <pr*****@private.com> wrote in message
news:oc********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 17 May 2006 05:54:40 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:

Bottom line:

"Property is individual man's life and all non-procreative derivatives
of his life. 'Property' is the supreme subject of volition, just as
'energy' is the supreme subject of physics." --A. J. Galambos


Galambos' Theory of Volition designs a societal structure based upon
precise definitions, simple and demonstrable postulates, rigorous
logic, the quest to maximize freedom, and an allowance for the wide
variety in human desires and aspirations. The result is not the
inadequate private enterprise ballyhooed by every local Chamber of
Commerce, but a new capitalism, Capitalism III as Galambos called it.
For the first time in history, a true scientist, with a background in
astrophysics and mathematics, applies the methods of science to human
interaction, and succeeds. Originally disclosed in his lecture
series, V-50, this is the topic of Volume One of Galambos' Book One,
Sic Itur Ad Astra.

The major reason for the heretofore inadequacies of private enterprise
was its lack of appeal for mankind's most important individual, the
cosmological innovator. Albert Einstein was not "in it" for the
money. Indeed, private enterprisers have never even recognized that
knowledge and ideas are a form of property. Andrew Galambos rectifies
this with his Theory of Primary Property. By providing the highest of
rewards for intellectual accomplishment, Galambos designs a society in
which everyone receives what is due them, not just freedom, but an
even higher concept, Justice. Originally disclosed in the lecture
series, V-201, this is the topic of the remaining volumes of Sic Itur
Ad Astra.
Protecting property, and ESPECIALLY intellectual property, is the
single most noble function of ANY genteel civilization. In fact, it
is OBJECTIVELY noble -- because failure to protect it results in
murderous debacles like the Soviet Union.

================================================ ==========
On Tue, 16 May 2006 21:25:59 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:
Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

Thinking about going into business? Have an idea that you think will
change the world? What if you were told that there was no way you
could prevent someone from stealing your idea [especially important if
your idea is successful] and exploiting it to make a profit? What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn't be sure that your ideas would be protected?
Enter intellectual property rights. Intellectual property plays a
major role in the creation of businesses and prosperity because it
creates a culture that fosters the freedom to tap into one's
imagination and creative potential.

Wikipedia defines intellectual property as "various legal entitlements
which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other
intangibles in their expressed form. The holder of this legal
entitlement is generally entitled to exercise various exclusive rights
in relation to the subject matter of the IP. The term intellectual
property reflects the idea that this subject matter is the product of
the mind or the intellect, and that IP rights may be protected by law
in the same way as any other form of property."

The crucial thing to understand is that intellectual property is
property, and private property is protected because it is the
foundation for liberty. Dr. Lee Reed, Professor in the Terry College
of Business at the University of Georgia, has phrased it this way:
"property and liberty mean the same thing." He cites William
Blackstone, the famous English jurist, teacher and author of The
Commentaries on the Laws of England; John Locke, the political
philosopher whose theories greatly influenced the American Founders;
and James Madison, often dubbed "the Father of the Constitution" as
support for this notion that private property is absolutely
indispensable in any kind of consideration of liberty.

Property rights are not only essential for freedom, but also for
economic prosperity. It has been well-documented that there is a
strong, positive correlation between the strength of property rights
protection and the economic affluence of a country. As the world moves
forward in trying to relieve international poverty and stimulate the
global economy, private property rights, including intellectual
property protection, is going to have to be a part of that discourse.
Property is productive, and it gives incentive. IP protection spurs
citizens on to creating new resources-and thereby promoting the
economy.

If property is not protected, then freedom does not exist because the
fundamental premise of freedom is that you are able to do what it is
that you want with that which is yours; obviously the only caveat
being that what you want to do with your property cannot be to impinge
on the concordant right of others.

However, in the specific case of intellectual property, the
consequences of not protecting them are even more dire. If
intellectual property rights are not respected, critical elements of a
vibrant, productive economy are stripped away-creativity, imagination,
innovation and the desire and ability to compete. Those in societies
where intellectual property is disregarded are robbed of viable
outlets for their inventive gifts and the respect of who they are and
what they contribute to their world is withheld.

Everyone benefits from intellectual property protection. The economy
is constantly advancing, transforming as new ideas are thought up,
fresh products challenge the industry's incumbents and everyone is
given the freedom to pursue that which they have been gifted to
pursue-without fear of piracy, theft or counterfeiting. Governments
and individuals alike can flourish and prosper when not just IP rights
but private property rights in general are upheld and safeguarded.

It's fairly simple and straightforward once one expends a minimal
amount of mental energy as to why intellectual property is considered
to be so important. Yet as of April 26, I hadn't given much thought to
it at all. Incidentally, April 26 is "World Intellectual Property Day"
and the Institute for Policy Innovation hosted an event in honor of
that. I attended and had my mind blown by what a fundamental
consideration property rights truly were, and why intellectual
property should be included among the things that are considered
essential ingredients for a free, prosperous and competitive economy.

In fact, most of the ideas that have been disseminated in this column
stem from the speakers I heard at IPI's event. I was convinced in one
fell swoop that IP is something worth pursuing, establishing and
defending-particularly in countries that are struggling to cultivate
economies that satisfy and succeed.

Simply coercing governments to implement IP protection legislation
isn't the answer; simple answers are hard to ascertain in tricky
policy issues. The answer will have to be a cultural battle that is
won-the individual citizens must be convinced that IP is in their best
interest. The local citizens must want IP protection if it is to be
truly instituted. At the same time, governments must be held
accountable if piracy runs rampant within their borders. In this
global economy, it is vital that IP is presented for what it truly is:
not a Western conception, not an American ideal-but a component of
property, a pillar of freedom and a necessary facet of true
prosperity.

There are many organizations, like IPI, leading the fight in IP
education and IP training - not just for governments, but for the
residents who are greatly affected as well. As countries develop,
solid groundwork for freedom will need to be laid in order to ensure
sustained economic growth and prosperity.

Freedom works.but it's takes a lot of work.

May 17 '06 #7

P: n/a
Jeff wrote:
In our society we need money. I believe we are stuck with IP laws and the
need for them so we can be creative.


I agree with you, however, in some cases, and especially in the US from
what I can gather in the papers north of them, it's gone to hell in a
hay basket. Patent a gene sequence?

It's been said before, but as someone who seems to promote not helping
anyone for fear of losing your intellectual property, Lauren has
benefited a *LOT* from *FREE* advice and sharing of intellectual
property on cdma. We may have hashed this out before on cdma, but what
a selfish, selfish anti-altruistic attitude to have. We are where we
are now because people share ideas. Yes, there are intellectual
property rights, but everything within reason. Lauren sounds like she
would have, in pre-history, let fellow humans freeze to death rather
than share her invention of the blanket.

In any event, from a cdma perspective, Lauren is trolling. This is a
very inappropriate cross-posting.

I would encourage everyone on cdma to do what I'm about to do to this loser:

<PLONK>
--
Tim http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Whatcha doin?" - Ditto "TIM-MAY!!" - Me
May 17 '06 #8

P: n/a
Tim Marshall wrote:
I would encourage everyone on cdma to do what I'm about to do to this
loser:

<PLONK>


Sorry Jeff, I meant Lauren, of course.
--
Tim http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Whatcha doin?" - Ditto "TIM-MAY!!" - Me
May 17 '06 #9

P: n/a

"Tim Marshall" <TI****@PurplePandaChasers.Moertherium> schreef in bericht news:e4**********@coranto.ucs.mun.ca...

In any event, from a cdma perspective, Lauren is trolling. This is a
very inappropriate cross-posting.


I fully agree on this. Lauren's 'message' is just bullshit to me.
I dislike hypocrisy very much.

Arno R
May 17 '06 #10

P: n/a
"'69 Camaro"
<Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM> wrote in
news:Ip********************@adelphia.com:
Welcome back, Lauren.

I'm not sure that I understand the point you're trying to
make.


I'm not sure what her point is, but I imagine it like this:

Intellectual property, like energy, can not be created or
destroyed, only transformed. The transformation of one person's
idea into a better idea is what is needed, not constraint.on the
dissemination of ideas.

The protection of "intellectual property" is based purely on
greed and selfishness. Granting rights to intellectual property
is a surefire route to destruction of society.

And that's how I feel about it.

Example, people come here for solutions to their problems. Most
of us give our "knowledge and experience" to them for free. A
few (one, mainly) try to sell their "intellectual property", and
advertize.

--
Bob Quintal

PA is y I've altered my email address.
May 17 '06 #11

P: n/a
Tim Marshall <TI****@PurplePandaChasers.Moertherium> wrote in
news:e4**********@coranto.ucs.mun.ca:
In any event, from a cdma perspective, Lauren is trolling. This
is a very inappropriate cross-posting.

I would encourage everyone on cdma to do what I'm about to do to
this loser:

<PLONK>


I plonked her, but didn't see fit to announce it (though I was
tempted).

The Randian nonsense is of no benefit to anyone. It's basically
selfishness of the highest order, basically a "you can't steal my
ideas but I can take whatever I like because it's my right as a
creative and smart individual." It was malarkey way back when and
it's still malarkey, and mostly appeals to fairly dim bulbs who have
overly inflated opinions of themselves. My experience with truly
brilliant people is that they are completely generous with their
time and attention and are delighted to share their ideas.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.dfenton.com/
usenet at dfenton dot com http://www.dfenton.com/DFA/
May 17 '06 #12

P: n/a
Absolutely. Everything in context. Protect your rights against opportunism
by others, etc, but not against the greater good - so to speak. Now this is
a bit deep even for me.

Like most things, IP is getting abused by those who are opportunists.

Anyway, you are right. This not the place for this.

See ya.

Jeff Pritchard
________________
Asken Research Pty. Ltd.
Access Database Developers
http://www.asken.com.au

"Tim Marshall" <TI****@PurplePandaChasers.Moertherium> wrote in message
news:e4**********@coranto.ucs.mun.ca...
Jeff wrote:
In our society we need money. I believe we are stuck with IP laws and the
need for them so we can be creative.


I agree with you, however, in some cases, and especially in the US from
what I can gather in the papers north of them, it's gone to hell in a hay
basket. Patent a gene sequence?

It's been said before, but as someone who seems to promote not helping
anyone for fear of losing your intellectual property, Lauren has benefited
a *LOT* from *FREE* advice and sharing of intellectual property on cdma.
We may have hashed this out before on cdma, but what a selfish, selfish
anti-altruistic attitude to have. We are where we are now because people
share ideas. Yes, there are intellectual property rights, but everything
within reason. Lauren sounds like she would have, in pre-history, let
fellow humans freeze to death rather than share her invention of the
blanket.

In any event, from a cdma perspective, Lauren is trolling. This is a very
inappropriate cross-posting.

I would encourage everyone on cdma to do what I'm about to do to this
loser:

<PLONK>
--
Tim http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~tmarshal/
^o<
/#) "Burp-beep, burp-beep, burp-beep?" - Quaker Jake
/^^ "Whatcha doin?" - Ditto "TIM-MAY!!" - Me

May 17 '06 #13

P: n/a
On Wed, 17 May 2006 14:51:55 -0230, Tim Marshall
<TI****@PurplePandaChasers.Moertherium> wrote:
Jeff wrote:
In our society we need money. I believe we are stuck with IP laws and the
need for them so we can be creative.
I agree with you, however, in some cases, and especially in the US from
what I can gather in the papers north of them, it's gone to hell in a
hay basket. Patent a gene sequence?

It's been said before, but as someone who seems to promote not helping
anyone for fear of losing your intellectual property,


Please show me where I EVER suggested such a ridiculous idea.
Lauren has benefited a *LOT* from *FREE* advice and sharing of intellectual
property on cdma.
Correct -- and that is very much appreciated. I have already "paid it
forward." The essential nature of SINCERE and competent free advice
is that it IS given freely -- a very noble act. I simply observe the
self-evident fact that creative individuals are the SOLE rightful
judge of when they will share or protect the product of their minds.
Over the last 50 years, I have paid a fortune for access to ideas,
techniques and creations owned by others. In most cases, it was money
well spent and the rightful owners richly deserved the payment they
received. Discussion/sharing groups like cdma are a precious asset
to the IT community -- largely because people participate and share
VOLUNTARILY -- which means it's not possible to steal it or benefit
from it unjustly.
We may have hashed this out before on cdma, but what
a selfish, selfish anti-altruistic attitude to have.
Altruism is a monstrous sham. ALL unforced human actions are
motivated by the values held by the giver -- NOT by a desire to
"sacrifice" -- which can ONLY mean the exchange of something of value
for something of lesser value. Mother Theresa lived the life she
freely chose in honor of HER values. She was NOT an altruist. The
philosophy of Altruism is poison for the cause of human advancement.
It is at the heart of destructive ideas like Communism and all other
forms of collectivism -- morally fraudulent philosophies that inflict
things like income and property taxes which are nothing more noble
than coercive systems INTENDED to steal from the productive for the
unearned benefit of the less productive, and for the political
advantage of those who enforce such systems.
We are where we are now because people share ideas.
Correct -- to a degree. To a much larger degree, we are where we are
because of the awesome power of SELF-INTEREST to inspire innovation in
pursuit of just reward. Imagine how much further we would be if human
society consistently placed innovators at the pinnacle of respect,
reward and honor instead of stealing a larger percentage of their free
market rewards SIMPLY because they are more skilled at the game of
pleasing their fellow Man.
Yes, there are intellectual property rights, but everything within reason.
Correct. The ONLY just arbiter of reasonable reward is a truly FREE
marketplace -- NOT the arbitrary standards spawned by political
correctness and intrigue.
Lauren sounds like she would have, in pre-history, let fellow humans freeze
to death rather than share her invention of the blanket.
LOL! Utterly false. Human compassion and sharing are ESSENTIAL to
quality of life in human society -- but ONLY if it is 100% voluntary.
I do it often. I could not care less if anyone knows I do it, gives
me credit for doing it or if you believe I do it. However, the
immutable Right to protect intellectual property is suffering
unprecedented attack by a growing gang of looters around the world.
Nothing short of a ferocious counterattack is required to protect one
of the most valuable concepts in a prosperous human society.
Anti-property rights forces are inflicting harm -- possibly
irreversible harm. The economies of Russia, China, and many other
nations are operating largely on stolen software. The creators of
that intellectual property are absolutely right to take ALL needed
steps to eliminate the theft. Attacks on property rights have already
suppressed innovation in many creative people. Over the years, I've
worked with a number of aerospace, electrical and mechanical engineers
and researchers. Nineteen of the ones I know, and many others I know
about, have simply retired early or, in some cases, moved to China (of
all places) because they felt they were being exploited in the USA
(and they were). The ones who moved to China (from Boeing and
Lockheed-Martin) did so because about 12 years ago, they were offered
an opportunity to live in China and work on the Chinese space program
for salaries that exceeded their American pay (in dollars) -- and
here's the kicker -- TAX free! Despite the ravages of Communism (or
perhaps because of them), some people in China appear to understand
and honor the famous observation by Ayn Rand: "Competence is the ONLY
remaining moral code that's still on the gold standard."
In any event, from a cdma perspective, Lauren is trolling.
Nope. Responding.
This is a very inappropriate cross-posting.
I completely agree. This is my last such response. If you check my
posts early in this subject thread, you will see SEVERAL times when I
specifically asked if it was appropriate to continue a discussion of
this nature in the cdma venue. The discussion started when I had the
callow judgment to ask for advice on how craft a component of a system
designed to protect my client's intellectual property. I suddenly
found myself under attack for daring to suggest that IP protection is
essential to the cause of continued innovation and the consequent
social prosperity (which it is). NONE of the people I asked (regular,
generous cdma contributors) seemed the slightest bit concerned about
the off-topic direction the discussion had taken and simply compounded
it with further such discussion.
I would encourage everyone on cdma to do what I'm about to do to this loser:

<PLONK>


LOL! Fine. Fortunately there are thousands of other competent
technicians outside of cdma who gladly share their knowledge without
all the liberal paranoia exhibited by some cdma posters -- people who
chose NOT to be offended by the very idea that anyone would want to
implement a technological mechanism to protect their intellectual
property. Thanks to the gracious, voluntary help of NON-cdma people,
the project is complete and functioning as my client wished -- and it
was far simpler to do than I originally feared it would be. A SINGLE
line of code was what cause all the other pieces to fall into place.

Best of luck to you all.
May 19 '06 #14

P: n/a
How sad! How very, very sad!

May 19 '06 #15

P: n/a
Very nice example of hanging somone by their own petard.

--

Terry Kreft
"'69 Camaro" <Fo**************************@Spameater.orgZERO_SP AM> wrote in
message news:Ip********************@adelphia.com...
Welcome back, Lauren.

I'm not sure that I understand the point you're trying to make. By
plagiarizing Andrew J. Galambos's copyrighted material posted on the
following Web site:

http://www.tuspco.com
(© Copyright, 1961+, Andrew J. Galambos, et. al.
© Copyright, 1999+, The Andrew J. and Suzanne J. Galambos Natural Estate
Trust)

. . . and by posting Daniel Son's copyrighted article in its entirety from
the following Web page:

http://www.townhall.com/opinion/colu...12/197163.html
(Copyright © 2006 Townhall.com)

. . . likely in direct violation with Townhall.com's legal policy, which is stated on its Web site:

http://www.townhall.com/townhall/legal.html

"6.4 General Practices Regarding Use of Platform.

"You, the Reader, agree that you, the Reader, will not:
". . . (4) mimic, reproduce, copy, edit, alter, modify, or publicly display any information displayed on our website (except for The the the (sic)
Reader's Information), or produce derivative works from our website (other
than from The the the (sic) Reader's Information), to the extent that such
action(s) would comprise an infringement upon or otherwise violate the
intellectual property rights of TownSquare or any other third party, unless you, you, (sic) the Reader,, acquire prior written consent of TownSquare or the appropriate third party."

. . . are you trying to say that attempts to protect intellectual property
are useless because people like you will just ignore IP laws? Or are you
trying to say that written ideas shouldn't be covered under current IP laws? Or are you trying to say that our allowing you to flaunt current IP laws
"results in murderous debacles like the Soviet Union," as you put it? (If
this last one is the case then I shudder to think that our inaction might
cause deaths, but just how many debacled murders are we talking about, and
in who's neighborhood? If it's just the one plagiarist in your
neighborhood, and on your side of the street, then please forgive us while
we debate about whether it is more noble to protect copyrights than to
protect lives and, should we decide in your favor, determine exactly who
should be the noble one to come save you -- just in case we don't get there before the coroner does.)

Or are you trying to say those of us who exercise our creative potential by providing free answers for the benefit of people -- including you, Lauren -- who post questions regarding how to use Microsoft Access in the
comp.databases.ms-access newsgroup, should instead be spending our time in
pursuit of legal means to prevent people like you from exploiting "our"
ideas to earn a profit? Or that we should be spending our time in pursuit
of paying business opportunities, instead of helping others who don't yet
have the necessary skills to earn a living in this field, and possibly never will unless they get significant amounts of help from experts, just like you have so many times, year after year? In other words, you're saying that we should only be concerned with guarding our own prosperity, which will, in
turn, automagixly increase all humans' prosperity? What a truly noble
society we live in.

Gunny

See http://www.QBuilt.com for all your database needs.
See http://www.Access.QBuilt.com for Microsoft Access tips and tutorials.
http://www.Access.QBuilt.com/html/ex...ributors2.html for contact
info.
"Lauren Wilson" <pr*****@private.com> wrote in message
news:oc********************************@4ax.com...
On Wed, 17 May 2006 05:54:40 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:

Bottom line:

"Property is individual man's life and all non-procreative derivatives
of his life. 'Property' is the supreme subject of volition, just as
'energy' is the supreme subject of physics." --A. J. Galambos


Galambos' Theory of Volition designs a societal structure based upon
precise definitions, simple and demonstrable postulates, rigorous
logic, the quest to maximize freedom, and an allowance for the wide
variety in human desires and aspirations. The result is not the
inadequate private enterprise ballyhooed by every local Chamber of
Commerce, but a new capitalism, Capitalism III as Galambos called it.
For the first time in history, a true scientist, with a background in
astrophysics and mathematics, applies the methods of science to human
interaction, and succeeds. Originally disclosed in his lecture
series, V-50, this is the topic of Volume One of Galambos' Book One,
Sic Itur Ad Astra.

The major reason for the heretofore inadequacies of private enterprise
was its lack of appeal for mankind's most important individual, the
cosmological innovator. Albert Einstein was not "in it" for the
money. Indeed, private enterprisers have never even recognized that
knowledge and ideas are a form of property. Andrew Galambos rectifies
this with his Theory of Primary Property. By providing the highest of
rewards for intellectual accomplishment, Galambos designs a society in
which everyone receives what is due them, not just freedom, but an
even higher concept, Justice. Originally disclosed in the lecture
series, V-201, this is the topic of the remaining volumes of Sic Itur
Ad Astra.
Protecting property, and ESPECIALLY intellectual property, is the
single most noble function of ANY genteel civilization. In fact, it
is OBJECTIVELY noble -- because failure to protect it results in
murderous debacles like the Soviet Union.

================================================ ==========
On Tue, 16 May 2006 21:25:59 -0500, Lauren Wilson
<pr*****@private.com> wrote:

Owning your ideas: An essential tool for freedom
By Daniel Son

Thinking about going into business? Have an idea that you think will
change the world? What if you were told that there was no way you
could prevent someone from stealing your idea [especially important if
your idea is successful] and exploiting it to make a profit? What
incentive would there be for you to be innovative, creative and
ambitious if you couldn't be sure that your ideas would be protected?
Enter intellectual property rights. Intellectual property plays a
major role in the creation of businesses and prosperity because it
creates a culture that fosters the freedom to tap into one's
imagination and creative potential.

Wikipedia defines intellectual property as "various legal entitlements
which attach to certain types of information, ideas, or other
intangibles in their expressed form. The holder of this legal
entitlement is generally entitled to exercise various exclusive rights
in relation to the subject matter of the IP. The term intellectual
property reflects the idea that this subject matter is the product of
the mind or the intellect, and that IP rights may be protected by law
in the same way as any other form of property."

The crucial thing to understand is that intellectual property is
property, and private property is protected because it is the
foundation for liberty. Dr. Lee Reed, Professor in the Terry College
of Business at the University of Georgia, has phrased it this way:
"property and liberty mean the same thing." He cites William
Blackstone, the famous English jurist, teacher and author of The
Commentaries on the Laws of England; John Locke, the political
philosopher whose theories greatly influenced the American Founders;
and James Madison, often dubbed "the Father of the Constitution" as
support for this notion that private property is absolutely
indispensable in any kind of consideration of liberty.

Property rights are not only essential for freedom, but also for
economic prosperity. It has been well-documented that there is a
strong, positive correlation between the strength of property rights
protection and the economic affluence of a country. As the world moves
forward in trying to relieve international poverty and stimulate the
global economy, private property rights, including intellectual
property protection, is going to have to be a part of that discourse.
Property is productive, and it gives incentive. IP protection spurs
citizens on to creating new resources-and thereby promoting the
economy.

If property is not protected, then freedom does not exist because the
fundamental premise of freedom is that you are able to do what it is
that you want with that which is yours; obviously the only caveat
being that what you want to do with your property cannot be to impinge
on the concordant right of others.

However, in the specific case of intellectual property, the
consequences of not protecting them are even more dire. If
intellectual property rights are not respected, critical elements of a
vibrant, productive economy are stripped away-creativity, imagination,
innovation and the desire and ability to compete. Those in societies
where intellectual property is disregarded are robbed of viable
outlets for their inventive gifts and the respect of who they are and
what they contribute to their world is withheld.

Everyone benefits from intellectual property protection. The economy
is constantly advancing, transforming as new ideas are thought up,
fresh products challenge the industry's incumbents and everyone is
given the freedom to pursue that which they have been gifted to
pursue-without fear of piracy, theft or counterfeiting. Governments
and individuals alike can flourish and prosper when not just IP rights
but private property rights in general are upheld and safeguarded.

It's fairly simple and straightforward once one expends a minimal
amount of mental energy as to why intellectual property is considered
to be so important. Yet as of April 26, I hadn't given much thought to
it at all. Incidentally, April 26 is "World Intellectual Property Day"
and the Institute for Policy Innovation hosted an event in honor of
that. I attended and had my mind blown by what a fundamental
consideration property rights truly were, and why intellectual
property should be included among the things that are considered
essential ingredients for a free, prosperous and competitive economy.

In fact, most of the ideas that have been disseminated in this column
stem from the speakers I heard at IPI's event. I was convinced in one
fell swoop that IP is something worth pursuing, establishing and
defending-particularly in countries that are struggling to cultivate
economies that satisfy and succeed.

Simply coercing governments to implement IP protection legislation
isn't the answer; simple answers are hard to ascertain in tricky
policy issues. The answer will have to be a cultural battle that is
won-the individual citizens must be convinced that IP is in their best
interest. The local citizens must want IP protection if it is to be
truly instituted. At the same time, governments must be held
accountable if piracy runs rampant within their borders. In this
global economy, it is vital that IP is presented for what it truly is:
not a Western conception, not an American ideal-but a component of
property, a pillar of freedom and a necessary facet of true
prosperity.

There are many organizations, like IPI, leading the fight in IP
education and IP training - not just for governments, but for the
residents who are greatly affected as well. As countries develop,
solid groundwork for freedom will need to be laid in order to ensure
sustained economic growth and prosperity.

Freedom works.but it's takes a lot of work.


May 19 '06 #16

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.