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REQ: MS Access Direction to Pursue ...

P: n/a
Good Afternoon ...

.... I hope the sun is shining in your domain ...

.... if you would be so kind, would you please suggest MS Access reading
material, based on the following input:

1. Knowledge level ... Newbie
2. As a user of MS Access - written programs; i.e., I will be using
someone's program; I might have to enter data, look up records, etc.
3. As a creator of MS Access programs

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Jim Hughes
********************************************
Apr 30 '06 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
2. if you're using somebody else's database, hopefully a user interface as
been built for you. rule of thumb would be to use that interface rather than
to enter/edit data directly in tables. if the db doesn't come with a user
interface, see #3 below.

3. creating an Access database consists of two "parts": 1) analyzing the
process that the database must support, and writing the tables/relationships
structure (data modeling, and 2) creating those tables/relationships in
Access, and then building the queries/forms/reports to interact with the
data. for more information and recommended reading, see
http://home.att.net/~california.db/tips.html - tips #1 and #2. when you
begin actually building the database, suggest you come back to the page and
read the rest of the tips, which are geared specifically to newbie
developers.

hth
"Jim Hughes" <jh******@twmi.rr.com> wrote in message
news:9T******************@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com.. .
Good Afternoon ...

... I hope the sun is shining in your domain ...

... if you would be so kind, would you please suggest MS Access reading
material, based on the following input:

1. Knowledge level ... Newbie
2. As a user of MS Access - written programs; i.e., I will be using
someone's program; I might have to enter data, look up records, etc.
3. As a creator of MS Access programs

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Jim Hughes
********************************************

Apr 30 '06 #2

P: n/a
.... tina ...

.... thank you very much!

.... I will follow your directions ....

Thanks for your time

Take care.
Jim Hughes
******************************
"tina" <no****@address.com> wrote in message
news:n%******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
2. if you're using somebody else's database, hopefully a user interface as
been built for you. rule of thumb would be to use that interface rather
than
to enter/edit data directly in tables. if the db doesn't come with a user
interface, see #3 below.

3. creating an Access database consists of two "parts": 1) analyzing the
process that the database must support, and writing the
tables/relationships
structure (data modeling, and 2) creating those tables/relationships in
Access, and then building the queries/forms/reports to interact with the
data. for more information and recommended reading, see
http://home.att.net/~california.db/tips.html - tips #1 and #2. when you
begin actually building the database, suggest you come back to the page
and
read the rest of the tips, which are geared specifically to newbie
developers.

hth
"Jim Hughes" <jh******@twmi.rr.com> wrote in message
news:9T******************@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com.. .
Good Afternoon ...

... I hope the sun is shining in your domain ...

... if you would be so kind, would you please suggest MS Access reading
material, based on the following input:

1. Knowledge level ... Newbie
2. As a user of MS Access - written programs; i.e., I will be using
someone's program; I might have to enter data, look up records, etc.
3. As a creator of MS Access programs

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Jim Hughes
********************************************


Apr 30 '06 #3

P: n/a
you're welcome. good luck with your project! :)
"Jim Hughes" <jh******@twmi.rr.com> wrote in message
news:iX*****************@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
... tina ...

... thank you very much!

... I will follow your directions ....

Thanks for your time

Take care.
Jim Hughes
******************************
"tina" <no****@address.com> wrote in message
news:n%******************@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
2. if you're using somebody else's database, hopefully a user interface as been built for you. rule of thumb would be to use that interface rather
than
to enter/edit data directly in tables. if the db doesn't come with a user interface, see #3 below.

3. creating an Access database consists of two "parts": 1) analyzing the process that the database must support, and writing the
tables/relationships
structure (data modeling, and 2) creating those tables/relationships in
Access, and then building the queries/forms/reports to interact with the
data. for more information and recommended reading, see
http://home.att.net/~california.db/tips.html - tips #1 and #2. when you
begin actually building the database, suggest you come back to the page
and
read the rest of the tips, which are geared specifically to newbie
developers.

hth
"Jim Hughes" <jh******@twmi.rr.com> wrote in message
news:9T******************@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com.. .
Good Afternoon ...

... I hope the sun is shining in your domain ...

... if you would be so kind, would you please suggest MS Access reading
material, based on the following input:

1. Knowledge level ... Newbie
2. As a user of MS Access - written programs; i.e., I will be using
someone's program; I might have to enter data, look up records, etc.
3. As a creator of MS Access programs

Thanks for your time and consideration.
Jim Hughes
********************************************



Apr 30 '06 #4

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