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Access 2002 vs. 2003

P: n/a
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy is
upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL Server
at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he already has
licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even if
Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that much
of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I say in
support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil
Feb 7 '06 #1
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52 Replies


P: n/a
Neil wrote:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy is
upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL Server
at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he already has
licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even if
Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that much
of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I say in
support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil

The 2003 series has provided several fixes over the 2002 version.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer
Feb 7 '06 #2

P: n/a
Thanks, Joe. Do you know, specifically, what those fixes are; or is there a
web site that lists them?

The network guy will say that the fixes should be available as a service
pack to 2002. Do you know if that's true?

Thanks!

Neil

"Joe Obergfell" <Ob*********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Neil wrote:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy
is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL
Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he
already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even
if Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil

The 2003 series has provided several fixes over the 2002 version.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer

Feb 7 '06 #3

P: n/a
Neil wrote:
Thanks, Joe. Do you know, specifically, what those fixes are; or is there a
web site that lists them?

The network guy will say that the fixes should be available as a service
pack to 2002. Do you know if that's true?

Thanks!

Neil

"Joe Obergfell" <Ob*********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Neil wrote:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy
is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL
Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he
already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even
if Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil

The 2003 series has provided several fixes over the 2002 version.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer


I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe
if you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be
able to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right,
These fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to
save time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there is
a difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time, if
not in price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer
Feb 7 '06 #4

P: n/a
>We are also looking to do a fair amount of redevelopment of our
application, and I want to do it in 2003.
I also like 2003. Things like themed controls make the software look a LOT
better. here is some screen shots of what I mean

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...icles/Grid.htm

and

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...heme/index.htm

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?
No, you are not. I can't see any good reason, or argument to upgrade here.
The only reason would be that you "like" a2003 better.....

There is little, if any changes in terms of support for sql server....so,
no, there is no big real argument here that I can make a case.

However, see below for a2003 features (this is a reposted message)

Also, here is a fabulous post by MVP John Viescas on this
very subject late last year. (This was comparing Access 2003 to 2002).
They didn't make any major changes. Here's a summary:

View information on object dependencies

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can view information
on dependencies between database objects. Viewing a list
of objects that use a specific object helps maintain a
database over time and avoid errors related to missing
record sources. For example, the Quarterly Orders query in
the Sales database is no longer needed, but before
deleting it, you might want to find out which other
objects in the database use the query. Then, you could
either change the record source of the dependent objects,
or delete them, before deleting the Quarterly Orders
query. Viewing a complete list of dependent objects helps
you save time and minimize errors.

In addition to viewing the list of objects that are bound
to a selected object, you can also view the objects that
are being used by the selected object.

Macros, modules, and data access pages are not searched
for dependencies. Access projects do not support this
feature.

Error checking in forms and reports

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can enable automatic
error checking for common errors in forms and reports.
Error checking points out errors, such as two controls
using the same keyboard shortcut, and the width of a report
being greater than the page it will be printed on.
Enabling error checking helps you identify errors and
correct them.

Propagating field properties

In previous versions of Microsoft Access, whenever you
modified a field's inherited property, you had to manually
modify the property of the corresponding control in each
of the forms and reports. Now, when you modify an
inherited field property in Table design view, Access
displays an option to update the property of all or some
controls that are bound to the field.

Smart tags

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can use the SmartTags
property to add a smart tag to any field in a table,
query, form, report, or data access page in a database.

Back up a database or project

You can back up the current database or project before
making major changes to it. The backup will be saved in
the default backup location, or in the current folder.

To restore a database, go to the location of the backup,
rename the file, and open it in Access.

Windows XP theme support

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system offers you
several themes. If you have chosen a theme other than the
default, Access will apply the chosen theme to views,
dialog boxes, and controls. You can prevent form controls
from inheriting themes from the operating system by
setting an option on the database or project.

Improved sorting in controls

You can now specify the ascending or descending sort order
of up to four fields in the List Box and Combo Box Wizards
in forms and reports, and the Lookup Wizard in an Access
database. The sort page added to these wizards looks and
behaves like the sort page in the Report Wizard.

Autocorrect options

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you have more control
over the behavior of the AutoCorrect feature. The
AutoCorrect Options button appears near text that was
automatically corrected. If you find on occasion that you
don't want text to be corrected, you can undo a correction
or turn AutoCorrect options on or off by clicking the
button and making a selection.

Enhanced font capabilities in SQL views

In the SQL and query Design views of a query in both a
Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Access project,
you can now change the font and font size of the text by
using the Query design font option added to the
Tables/Queries tab of the Options dialog box under the
Tools menu. These settings apply to all databases and work
with the high-contrast and other accessibility settings of
your computer.

Context-based Help in SQL view

In the SQL view of a query in a Microsoft Access database,
you can now get help specific to Jet SQL keywords, VBA
functions, and Access functions. Simply press F1 to bring
up the help that corresponds to the text near the cursor.
You can also search the Jet SQL and VBA function reference
topics.

Importing, exporting, and linking

Importing, exporting, and linking to a Microsoft Windows
SharePoint Services list from Access

You can perform the following operations with a Windows
SharePoint Services list:

?Export the contents of a table or a query to a list.

?Import the contents of a list into a table.

?Link a table to a list.

Exporting and linking to Access data from Windows
SharePoint Services

You can now export a list in its Datasheet view from
Windows SharePoint Services to a static table or to a
linked table in Access. When you export to a static table,
you create a table in Access. You can then view and make
changes to the table independent of the original list in
Windows SharePoint Services. Similarly, you can change the
list in Windows SharePoint Services, and that will not
affect the table in Access.

When you export to a linked table, you create a table in
Access and establish a dynamic link between the table and
the list such that changes to the table are reflected in
the list, and changes to the list are reflected in the
table as well.

Make a local table from a linked table

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can make a local copy
of the structure or data and structure contained in a
linked table.

XML support

With the enhanced XML support in Microsoft Office Access
2003, you can specify a transform file when you import
data from or export data to XML. The transform is then
applied automatically. When you import XML data, the
transform is applied to the data as soon as the data is
imported, before any new table is created or an existing
one is appended to. When you export data to XML, the
transform is applied following the export operation.

Often times a database contains lookup values that are
stored in another database. You can now include these
related tables when exporting. You can also include any
predefined filter or sort order for an object when
exporting the object.

Security enhancements

Macro Security Microsoft Office Access 2003 allows you to
protect against potentially unsafe Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) code by setting the macro security
level. You can set the security level so that you are
prompted every time that you open a database containing
VBA code, or you can automatically block databases that
are from unknown sources.

Additionally, Access uses Microsoft Authenticode
technology to enable you to digitally sign a macro project
by using a digital certificate. The certificate used to
create this signature confirms that the macro originated
from the signer, and the signature confirms that it has
not been altered. When you set the macro security level,
you can run macros based on whether they are digitally
signed by a developer on your list of trusted sources.

Block Potentially Unsafe Functions Access utilizes the
Microsoft Jet Expression Service enhanced sandbox mode to
block potentially unsafe functions from being used in
expressions.


Feb 7 '06 #5

P: n/a
I don't see much difference between the two versions. The next version of
Access/Office will be DRAMATICALLY different. You may love it or you may
hate it but everything you think you know about the Office interface you
will need to relearn. So, my feeling is rather than fight to spend the
money for O2003 licenses now, use the O2002 licenses and fight for the
upgrade in next year's budget. Once you get past the interface changes,
there are some awesome new features coming up in Access.

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:4H*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy
is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL
Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he
already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even if
Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil

Feb 7 '06 #6

P: n/a
If the 2003 fixes are available as 2002 service packs, I'm sure they'd go
with the SPs. It seems that there are no license packs for upgrades, so the
price to upgrade office is steep -- $410 a pop for Office Pro 2003 and $185
a pop for Access 2003 alone (that, in contrast to the fact that the Access
2003 off-the-shelf upgrade can be gotten for about $85 a box). So at 35
seats, it's a chunk of change to upgrade to Access 2003, which I'm sure
they'd avoid with SPs, if they're the same.

Neil
"Joe Obergfell" <Ob*********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:uq****************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Neil wrote:
Thanks, Joe. Do you know, specifically, what those fixes are; or is there
a web site that lists them?

The network guy will say that the fixes should be available as a service
pack to 2002. Do you know if that's true?

Thanks!

Neil

"Joe Obergfell" <Ob*********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Neil wrote:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network
guy is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and
SQL Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and,
since he already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade
to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even
if Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil
The 2003 series has provided several fixes over the 2002 version.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer


I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe if
you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be able
to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right, These
fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to save
time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there is a
difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time, if not in
price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer

Feb 7 '06 #7

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy is
upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL Server
at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he already has
licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even if
Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.


Note that most of your users only need the runtime version of Access.
Your power users who create queries will want a full version of
Access. Furthermore you can easily use the new features of Access but
create A2002 MDEs (using A2002) to distribute to your users.

Standard blurb follows.

I'd also strongly suggest your network guy stage his upgrades. This
month Win 2003 Server. Next month or two SQL Server. Later for
Office. Besides those upgrades really don't care about the server.

Hmm, the more I think about this, if he really wants to do all those
upgrades at the same time, he's an utter idiot.

Tony

Been working in A2003 and I really like the smart tags Access pops up
on the controls

For example I added some &s to some unassociated labels. Access
promptly tells me they're unassociated and gives me an option to
associate the label to a control. Nice.

Or if you've renamed fields in the tables the controls based on the
old names are obviously incorrect. Now a little triangle appears in
the corner. Again nice.

I created a report and I see a little flag in that little grey box in
the upper left hand corner of the report. I click on it and see a
"Common Report Error" "Report width is greater than page width" with a
bunch of options.

Someone spent some time on these little touches.

Oh, I'm developing in A2003. But the users will be given an A2000
MDE. So long as I use no new features I should be fine with that.

Very nice. I can see how this would help the newbie/itinerant Access
users.

I also see lots of flags for the label controls in the headers of new
reports. They're a bit of a pain but they are also easily ignored.
They won't appear once you close and reopen the report.
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 7 '06 #8

P: n/a
Thanks. Since we are looking to rework our app, I think whatever version we
go to will be it for a while. I like the idea of going with 2002/2003, since
it will require less reworking of code than the next version of Access will
require. So, if there's not that much of a difference between 2002/3, then I
guess 2002 is it!

Thanks again.

Neil

"Pat Hartman(MVP)" <pa****@NoSpam.optonline.net> wrote in message
news:OB*************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
I don't see much difference between the two versions. The next version of
Access/Office will be DRAMATICALLY different. You may love it or you may
hate it but everything you think you know about the Office interface you
will need to relearn. So, my feeling is rather than fight to spend the
money for O2003 licenses now, use the O2002 licenses and fight for the
upgrade in next year's budget. Once you get past the interface changes,
there are some awesome new features coming up in Access.

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:4H*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
We are running an Access 2000 MDB with a SQL 7 back end. Our network guy
is upgrading to Windows Server 2003 and wants to upgrade Office and SQL
Server at the same time. We're moving to SQL Server 2005, and, since he
already has licenses for Office Pro 2002, he wants to upgrade to that.

I've been saying that we need to upgrade to Access 2003, not 2002, even
if Office is kept at 2002. We are also looking to do a fair amount of
redevelopment of our application, and I want to do it in 2003.

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?

Thanks!

Neil


Feb 7 '06 #9

P: n/a
Thanks for this, Albert. I'll review it in detail.

One thing I'm wondering, though: Access 2003 uses a new file format (with
the ability to still use the Access 2000/2002 format). So that seems like a
major change to me. Or is that not a big deal?

Thanks,

Neil

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:u0**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
We are also looking to do a fair amount of redevelopment of our
application, and I want to do it in 2003.


I also like 2003. Things like themed controls make the software look a LOT
better. here is some screen shots of what I mean

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...icles/Grid.htm

and

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...heme/index.htm

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?


No, you are not. I can't see any good reason, or argument to upgrade here.
The only reason would be that you "like" a2003 better.....

There is little, if any changes in terms of support for sql server....so,
no, there is no big real argument here that I can make a case.

However, see below for a2003 features (this is a reposted message)

Also, here is a fabulous post by MVP John Viescas on this
very subject late last year.

(This was comparing Access 2003 to 2002).
They didn't make any major changes. Here's a summary:

View information on object dependencies

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can view information
on dependencies between database objects. Viewing a list
of objects that use a specific object helps maintain a
database over time and avoid errors related to missing
record sources. For example, the Quarterly Orders query in
the Sales database is no longer needed, but before
deleting it, you might want to find out which other
objects in the database use the query. Then, you could
either change the record source of the dependent objects,
or delete them, before deleting the Quarterly Orders
query. Viewing a complete list of dependent objects helps
you save time and minimize errors.

In addition to viewing the list of objects that are bound
to a selected object, you can also view the objects that
are being used by the selected object.

Macros, modules, and data access pages are not searched
for dependencies. Access projects do not support this
feature.

Error checking in forms and reports

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can enable automatic
error checking for common errors in forms and reports.
Error checking points out errors, such as two controls
using the same keyboard shortcut, and the width of a report
being greater than the page it will be printed on.
Enabling error checking helps you identify errors and
correct them.

Propagating field properties

In previous versions of Microsoft Access, whenever you
modified a field's inherited property, you had to manually
modify the property of the corresponding control in each
of the forms and reports. Now, when you modify an
inherited field property in Table design view, Access
displays an option to update the property of all or some
controls that are bound to the field.

Smart tags

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can use the SmartTags
property to add a smart tag to any field in a table,
query, form, report, or data access page in a database.

Back up a database or project

You can back up the current database or project before
making major changes to it. The backup will be saved in
the default backup location, or in the current folder.

To restore a database, go to the location of the backup,
rename the file, and open it in Access.

Windows XP theme support

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system offers you
several themes. If you have chosen a theme other than the
default, Access will apply the chosen theme to views,
dialog boxes, and controls. You can prevent form controls
from inheriting themes from the operating system by
setting an option on the database or project.

Improved sorting in controls

You can now specify the ascending or descending sort order
of up to four fields in the List Box and Combo Box Wizards
in forms and reports, and the Lookup Wizard in an Access
database. The sort page added to these wizards looks and
behaves like the sort page in the Report Wizard.

Autocorrect options

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you have more control
over the behavior of the AutoCorrect feature. The
AutoCorrect Options button appears near text that was
automatically corrected. If you find on occasion that you
don't want text to be corrected, you can undo a correction
or turn AutoCorrect options on or off by clicking the
button and making a selection.

Enhanced font capabilities in SQL views

In the SQL and query Design views of a query in both a
Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Access project,
you can now change the font and font size of the text by
using the Query design font option added to the
Tables/Queries tab of the Options dialog box under the
Tools menu. These settings apply to all databases and work
with the high-contrast and other accessibility settings of
your computer.

Context-based Help in SQL view

In the SQL view of a query in a Microsoft Access database,
you can now get help specific to Jet SQL keywords, VBA
functions, and Access functions. Simply press F1 to bring
up the help that corresponds to the text near the cursor.
You can also search the Jet SQL and VBA function reference
topics.

Importing, exporting, and linking

Importing, exporting, and linking to a Microsoft Windows
SharePoint Services list from Access

You can perform the following operations with a Windows
SharePoint Services list:

?Export the contents of a table or a query to a list.

?Import the contents of a list into a table.

?Link a table to a list.

Exporting and linking to Access data from Windows
SharePoint Services

You can now export a list in its Datasheet view from
Windows SharePoint Services to a static table or to a
linked table in Access. When you export to a static table,
you create a table in Access. You can then view and make
changes to the table independent of the original list in
Windows SharePoint Services. Similarly, you can change the
list in Windows SharePoint Services, and that will not
affect the table in Access.

When you export to a linked table, you create a table in
Access and establish a dynamic link between the table and
the list such that changes to the table are reflected in
the list, and changes to the list are reflected in the
table as well.

Make a local table from a linked table

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can make a local copy
of the structure or data and structure contained in a
linked table.

XML support

With the enhanced XML support in Microsoft Office Access
2003, you can specify a transform file when you import
data from or export data to XML. The transform is then
applied automatically. When you import XML data, the
transform is applied to the data as soon as the data is
imported, before any new table is created or an existing
one is appended to. When you export data to XML, the
transform is applied following the export operation.

Often times a database contains lookup values that are
stored in another database. You can now include these
related tables when exporting. You can also include any
predefined filter or sort order for an object when
exporting the object.

Security enhancements

Macro Security Microsoft Office Access 2003 allows you to
protect against potentially unsafe Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) code by setting the macro security
level. You can set the security level so that you are
prompted every time that you open a database containing
VBA code, or you can automatically block databases that
are from unknown sources.

Additionally, Access uses Microsoft Authenticode
technology to enable you to digitally sign a macro project
by using a digital certificate. The certificate used to
create this signature confirms that the macro originated
from the signer, and the signature confirms that it has
not been altered. When you set the macro security level,
you can run macros based on whether they are digitally
signed by a developer on your list of trusted sources.

Block Potentially Unsafe Functions Access utilizes the
Microsoft Jet Expression Service enhanced sandbox mode to
block potentially unsafe functions from being used in
expressions.


Feb 7 '06 #10

P: n/a
FYI, found this link:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/as...714971033.aspx . Has the
same info, but with some nice screen shots.

N

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:u0**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
We are also looking to do a fair amount of redevelopment of our
application, and I want to do it in 2003.


I also like 2003. Things like themed controls make the software look a LOT
better. here is some screen shots of what I mean

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...icles/Grid.htm

and

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...heme/index.htm

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?


No, you are not. I can't see any good reason, or argument to upgrade here.
The only reason would be that you "like" a2003 better.....

There is little, if any changes in terms of support for sql server....so,
no, there is no big real argument here that I can make a case.

However, see below for a2003 features (this is a reposted message)

Also, here is a fabulous post by MVP John Viescas on this
very subject late last year.

(This was comparing Access 2003 to 2002).
They didn't make any major changes. Here's a summary:

View information on object dependencies

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can view information
on dependencies between database objects. Viewing a list
of objects that use a specific object helps maintain a
database over time and avoid errors related to missing
record sources. For example, the Quarterly Orders query in
the Sales database is no longer needed, but before
deleting it, you might want to find out which other
objects in the database use the query. Then, you could
either change the record source of the dependent objects,
or delete them, before deleting the Quarterly Orders
query. Viewing a complete list of dependent objects helps
you save time and minimize errors.

In addition to viewing the list of objects that are bound
to a selected object, you can also view the objects that
are being used by the selected object.

Macros, modules, and data access pages are not searched
for dependencies. Access projects do not support this
feature.

Error checking in forms and reports

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can enable automatic
error checking for common errors in forms and reports.
Error checking points out errors, such as two controls
using the same keyboard shortcut, and the width of a report
being greater than the page it will be printed on.
Enabling error checking helps you identify errors and
correct them.

Propagating field properties

In previous versions of Microsoft Access, whenever you
modified a field's inherited property, you had to manually
modify the property of the corresponding control in each
of the forms and reports. Now, when you modify an
inherited field property in Table design view, Access
displays an option to update the property of all or some
controls that are bound to the field.

Smart tags

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can use the SmartTags
property to add a smart tag to any field in a table,
query, form, report, or data access page in a database.

Back up a database or project

You can back up the current database or project before
making major changes to it. The backup will be saved in
the default backup location, or in the current folder.

To restore a database, go to the location of the backup,
rename the file, and open it in Access.

Windows XP theme support

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system offers you
several themes. If you have chosen a theme other than the
default, Access will apply the chosen theme to views,
dialog boxes, and controls. You can prevent form controls
from inheriting themes from the operating system by
setting an option on the database or project.

Improved sorting in controls

You can now specify the ascending or descending sort order
of up to four fields in the List Box and Combo Box Wizards
in forms and reports, and the Lookup Wizard in an Access
database. The sort page added to these wizards looks and
behaves like the sort page in the Report Wizard.

Autocorrect options

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you have more control
over the behavior of the AutoCorrect feature. The
AutoCorrect Options button appears near text that was
automatically corrected. If you find on occasion that you
don't want text to be corrected, you can undo a correction
or turn AutoCorrect options on or off by clicking the
button and making a selection.

Enhanced font capabilities in SQL views

In the SQL and query Design views of a query in both a
Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Access project,
you can now change the font and font size of the text by
using the Query design font option added to the
Tables/Queries tab of the Options dialog box under the
Tools menu. These settings apply to all databases and work
with the high-contrast and other accessibility settings of
your computer.

Context-based Help in SQL view

In the SQL view of a query in a Microsoft Access database,
you can now get help specific to Jet SQL keywords, VBA
functions, and Access functions. Simply press F1 to bring
up the help that corresponds to the text near the cursor.
You can also search the Jet SQL and VBA function reference
topics.

Importing, exporting, and linking

Importing, exporting, and linking to a Microsoft Windows
SharePoint Services list from Access

You can perform the following operations with a Windows
SharePoint Services list:

?Export the contents of a table or a query to a list.

?Import the contents of a list into a table.

?Link a table to a list.

Exporting and linking to Access data from Windows
SharePoint Services

You can now export a list in its Datasheet view from
Windows SharePoint Services to a static table or to a
linked table in Access. When you export to a static table,
you create a table in Access. You can then view and make
changes to the table independent of the original list in
Windows SharePoint Services. Similarly, you can change the
list in Windows SharePoint Services, and that will not
affect the table in Access.

When you export to a linked table, you create a table in
Access and establish a dynamic link between the table and
the list such that changes to the table are reflected in
the list, and changes to the list are reflected in the
table as well.

Make a local table from a linked table

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can make a local copy
of the structure or data and structure contained in a
linked table.

XML support

With the enhanced XML support in Microsoft Office Access
2003, you can specify a transform file when you import
data from or export data to XML. The transform is then
applied automatically. When you import XML data, the
transform is applied to the data as soon as the data is
imported, before any new table is created or an existing
one is appended to. When you export data to XML, the
transform is applied following the export operation.

Often times a database contains lookup values that are
stored in another database. You can now include these
related tables when exporting. You can also include any
predefined filter or sort order for an object when
exporting the object.

Security enhancements

Macro Security Microsoft Office Access 2003 allows you to
protect against potentially unsafe Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) code by setting the macro security
level. You can set the security level so that you are
prompted every time that you open a database containing
VBA code, or you can automatically block databases that
are from unknown sources.

Additionally, Access uses Microsoft Authenticode
technology to enable you to digitally sign a macro project
by using a digital certificate. The certificate used to
create this signature confirms that the macro originated
from the signer, and the signature confirms that it has
not been altered. When you set the macro security level,
you can run macros based on whether they are digitally
signed by a developer on your list of trusted sources.

Block Potentially Unsafe Functions Access utilizes the
Microsoft Jet Expression Service enhanced sandbox mode to
block potentially unsafe functions from being used in
expressions.


Feb 7 '06 #11

P: n/a
Thanks for the samples regarding themed controls. Not sure what the
difference would be between using themed controls and just applying a
particular background shading manually. The only differences I saw were the
background shading and the rounded corners on buttons. Is there something
else.

(By the way, the second set of screen shots DO look much better. Very nice!)

Neil
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:u0**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
We are also looking to do a fair amount of redevelopment of our
application, and I want to do it in 2003.


I also like 2003. Things like themed controls make the software look a LOT
better. here is some screen shots of what I mean

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...icles/Grid.htm

and

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...heme/index.htm

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?


No, you are not. I can't see any good reason, or argument to upgrade here.
The only reason would be that you "like" a2003 better.....

There is little, if any changes in terms of support for sql server....so,
no, there is no big real argument here that I can make a case.

However, see below for a2003 features (this is a reposted message)

Also, here is a fabulous post by MVP John Viescas on this
very subject late last year.

(This was comparing Access 2003 to 2002).
They didn't make any major changes. Here's a summary:

View information on object dependencies

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can view information
on dependencies between database objects. Viewing a list
of objects that use a specific object helps maintain a
database over time and avoid errors related to missing
record sources. For example, the Quarterly Orders query in
the Sales database is no longer needed, but before
deleting it, you might want to find out which other
objects in the database use the query. Then, you could
either change the record source of the dependent objects,
or delete them, before deleting the Quarterly Orders
query. Viewing a complete list of dependent objects helps
you save time and minimize errors.

In addition to viewing the list of objects that are bound
to a selected object, you can also view the objects that
are being used by the selected object.

Macros, modules, and data access pages are not searched
for dependencies. Access projects do not support this
feature.

Error checking in forms and reports

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can enable automatic
error checking for common errors in forms and reports.
Error checking points out errors, such as two controls
using the same keyboard shortcut, and the width of a report
being greater than the page it will be printed on.
Enabling error checking helps you identify errors and
correct them.

Propagating field properties

In previous versions of Microsoft Access, whenever you
modified a field's inherited property, you had to manually
modify the property of the corresponding control in each
of the forms and reports. Now, when you modify an
inherited field property in Table design view, Access
displays an option to update the property of all or some
controls that are bound to the field.

Smart tags

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can use the SmartTags
property to add a smart tag to any field in a table,
query, form, report, or data access page in a database.

Back up a database or project

You can back up the current database or project before
making major changes to it. The backup will be saved in
the default backup location, or in the current folder.

To restore a database, go to the location of the backup,
rename the file, and open it in Access.

Windows XP theme support

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system offers you
several themes. If you have chosen a theme other than the
default, Access will apply the chosen theme to views,
dialog boxes, and controls. You can prevent form controls
from inheriting themes from the operating system by
setting an option on the database or project.

Improved sorting in controls

You can now specify the ascending or descending sort order
of up to four fields in the List Box and Combo Box Wizards
in forms and reports, and the Lookup Wizard in an Access
database. The sort page added to these wizards looks and
behaves like the sort page in the Report Wizard.

Autocorrect options

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you have more control
over the behavior of the AutoCorrect feature. The
AutoCorrect Options button appears near text that was
automatically corrected. If you find on occasion that you
don't want text to be corrected, you can undo a correction
or turn AutoCorrect options on or off by clicking the
button and making a selection.

Enhanced font capabilities in SQL views

In the SQL and query Design views of a query in both a
Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Access project,
you can now change the font and font size of the text by
using the Query design font option added to the
Tables/Queries tab of the Options dialog box under the
Tools menu. These settings apply to all databases and work
with the high-contrast and other accessibility settings of
your computer.

Context-based Help in SQL view

In the SQL view of a query in a Microsoft Access database,
you can now get help specific to Jet SQL keywords, VBA
functions, and Access functions. Simply press F1 to bring
up the help that corresponds to the text near the cursor.
You can also search the Jet SQL and VBA function reference
topics.

Importing, exporting, and linking

Importing, exporting, and linking to a Microsoft Windows
SharePoint Services list from Access

You can perform the following operations with a Windows
SharePoint Services list:

?Export the contents of a table or a query to a list.

?Import the contents of a list into a table.

?Link a table to a list.

Exporting and linking to Access data from Windows
SharePoint Services

You can now export a list in its Datasheet view from
Windows SharePoint Services to a static table or to a
linked table in Access. When you export to a static table,
you create a table in Access. You can then view and make
changes to the table independent of the original list in
Windows SharePoint Services. Similarly, you can change the
list in Windows SharePoint Services, and that will not
affect the table in Access.

When you export to a linked table, you create a table in
Access and establish a dynamic link between the table and
the list such that changes to the table are reflected in
the list, and changes to the list are reflected in the
table as well.

Make a local table from a linked table

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can make a local copy
of the structure or data and structure contained in a
linked table.

XML support

With the enhanced XML support in Microsoft Office Access
2003, you can specify a transform file when you import
data from or export data to XML. The transform is then
applied automatically. When you import XML data, the
transform is applied to the data as soon as the data is
imported, before any new table is created or an existing
one is appended to. When you export data to XML, the
transform is applied following the export operation.

Often times a database contains lookup values that are
stored in another database. You can now include these
related tables when exporting. You can also include any
predefined filter or sort order for an object when
exporting the object.

Security enhancements

Macro Security Microsoft Office Access 2003 allows you to
protect against potentially unsafe Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) code by setting the macro security
level. You can set the security level so that you are
prompted every time that you open a database containing
VBA code, or you can automatically block databases that
are from unknown sources.

Additionally, Access uses Microsoft Authenticode
technology to enable you to digitally sign a macro project
by using a digital certificate. The certificate used to
create this signature confirms that the macro originated
from the signer, and the signature confirms that it has
not been altered. When you set the macro security level,
you can run macros based on whether they are digitally
signed by a developer on your list of trusted sources.

Block Potentially Unsafe Functions Access utilizes the
Microsoft Jet Expression Service enhanced sandbox mode to
block potentially unsafe functions from being used in
expressions.


Feb 7 '06 #12

P: n/a
Pat Hartman(MVP) wrote:
I don't see much difference between the two versions. The next version of
Access/Office will be DRAMATICALLY different. You may love it or you may
hate it but everything you think you know about the Office interface you
will need to relearn. So, my feeling is rather than fight to spend the
money for O2003 licenses now, use the O2002 licenses and fight for the
upgrade in next year's budget. Once you get past the interface changes,
there are some awesome new features coming up in Access.


I hate to say this before I've finished downloading the PDC 05 material
made available by MS (thanks!), but I plan on viewing all of them if
possible. In spite of the great feelings generated by Samba under
Linux, managers and users here are leaning toward Microsoft. I feel
that ignoring either MS or open source would be a serious mistake. So
I'm looking at recommending a bunch of new 64 bit machines running MS
OS with the first version of Access that works after Access 12 (SP 2?)
along with some Linux boxes running OpenOffice in about a year from
now. I think that the sooner the conversion is made to 64 bit the
better given past experience. How well the new workflow paradigm will
fit in with future plans is also a consideration. Microsoft is in a
good position given the massive effort they've made to try to stay
relevant (provided MS doesn't mess up Samba compatibility with their
new servers). Six months ago the venture capitalists that were
formerly employed by MS were putting more money into open source. I
don't know if that's still the case. I'll know more about where I
should be headed after I've viewed all the PDC 05 presentations.

James A. Fortune
CD********@FortuneJames.com

Feb 7 '06 #13

P: n/a
> Note that most of your users only need the runtime version of Access.
Your power users who create queries will want a full version of
Access.
I don't even think I have any users who create queries. Most users just use
the app, perhaps doing some sorting or filtering, but that's about it.

I used the Access 97 runtime, but haven't used it since. I remember that
being problematic. Has it gotten better?

Also, they run Office anyway, since they use Word and Excel. If we ran the
Access 2003 runtime, that would be on top of Office Pro 2002. Sounds like
that might be problematic.
Furthermore you can easily use the new features of Access but
create A2002 MDEs (using A2002) to distribute to your users.
Yes, that's true, and that's a great idea. Since I connect through
PCAnywhere to an admin machine for my use, I was thinking that I could
upload the A2003 MDB; open it in A2002 on the admin machine, and then
recompile it in A2002 for distribution. I guess that's the same concept only
with an MDB.

One thing that concerns me, though: I've heard that there are potential
corruption issues when the db is developed and compiled in 2003 and then
opened in an earlier version (even with it being in 2000/2 format). I have
another client who is running Access 2003 and he would modify some forms and
reports in the MDB and then send it back to me (MDB was kept in 2000
format). I would open it in A2000 and frequently one of the forms or reports
that he modified was corrupted (could not open the code module for that
object). We stopped having him modify the MDB directly, but just send me
modified versions of the objects he changed, and the problem went away. So
I'm concerned about using A2003 but recompiling and distributing in A2002.
I'd also strongly suggest your network guy stage his upgrades. This
month Win 2003 Server. Next month or two SQL Server. Later for
Office. Besides those upgrades really don't care about the server.

Hmm, the more I think about this, if he really wants to do all those
upgrades at the same time, he's an utter idiot.


I think he was thinking that he would have to reinstall SQL Server after the
Windows upgrade, so he might as well install the new version. And, re.
upgrading Office, it was because he "had to touch each PC anyway" (his
words).

And, yes, he is an utter idiot.

Neil
Feb 7 '06 #14

P: n/a
>The only differences I saw were the
background shading and the rounded corners on buttons. Is there something
else.

no...nothing else. However, the rounded colors..and the xp theme do look
quite a bit better. In that grid list..you can see one screen in the old
format..and the rest are new...quite a nice improvement...

Access 2003 uses a new file format (with

the ability to still use the Access 2000/2002 format

Actually, all 3 versions default to a2000 format.

And, a2002 and a2003 share the same format...

This was done to allow all 3 versions to work with each other....

So, the default format is a2000..and in for 02 and 03..they share the same
format...
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Feb 7 '06 #15

P: n/a

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:ex*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
The only differences I saw were the

background shading and the rounded corners on buttons. Is there something
else.

no...nothing else. However, the rounded colors..and the xp theme do look
quite a bit better. In that grid list..you can see one screen in the old
format..and the rest are new...quite a nice improvement...


Yes, indeed!

N
Feb 7 '06 #16

P: n/a
>>Access 2003 uses a new file format (with
the ability to still use the Access 2000/2002 format

Actually, all 3 versions default to a2000 format.

And, a2002 and a2003 share the same format...

This was done to allow all 3 versions to work with each other....

So, the default format is a2000..and in for 02 and 03..they share the same
format...


I'm a bit confused. Somewhere else I read someone give advice that if a db
was developed in A2003 using A2003 format, that it couldn't be used in
A2002; but if it was developed in A2003 using A2000 format, then it could be
used with A2002, since A2000 and A2002 share the same format. If A2002 and
A2003 use the same format, then why couldn't an A2003 database in A2003
format be used with A2002?

Thanks.
Feb 7 '06 #17

P: n/a
Also, I noticed that Access 2003 has SP2. I wonder if fixes in the new 2003
SPs would be propagated down to 2002 SPs. Probably not, would be my guess
(but, then again, perhaps they don't need to be).

N
I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe if
you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be able
to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right, These
fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to save
time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there is a
difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time, if not in
price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer

Feb 7 '06 #18

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
Note that most of your users only need the runtime version of Access.
Your power users who create queries will want a full version of
Access.
I don't even think I have any users who create queries. Most users just use
the app, perhaps doing some sorting or filtering, but that's about it.

I used the Access 97 runtime, but haven't used it since. I remember that
being problematic. Has it gotten better?


Troublesome, yes. But in an environment where you control the OS and
software installs then they aren't usually a problem.
Also, they run Office anyway, since they use Word and Excel. If we ran the
Access 2003 runtime, that would be on top of Office Pro 2002. Sounds like
that might be problematic.
Slightly yes. But then uninstall the Access 2002 component of Office
Pro. IOW there was no need to spend the extra $ on the Pro portion of
Office Pro other than for those doing work on the MDBs such as you.
Furthermore you can easily use the new features of Access but
create A2002 MDEs (using A2002) to distribute to your users.


Yes, that's true, and that's a great idea. Since I connect through
PCAnywhere to an admin machine for my use, I was thinking that I could
upload the A2003 MDB; open it in A2002 on the admin machine, and then
recompile it in A2002 for distribution. I guess that's the same concept only
with an MDB.


Ayup.
One thing that concerns me, though: I've heard that there are potential
corruption issues when the db is developed and compiled in 2003 and then
opened in an earlier version (even with it being in 2000/2 format). I have
another client who is running Access 2003 and he would modify some forms and
reports in the MDB and then send it back to me (MDB was kept in 2000
format). I would open it in A2000 and frequently one of the forms or reports
that he modified was corrupted (could not open the code module for that
object). We stopped having him modify the MDB directly, but just send me
modified versions of the objects he changed, and the problem went away. So
I'm concerned about using A2003 but recompiling and distributing in A2002.
That's possible. I've been working in a similar environment recently
without any such issues.

But if you only use A2002 to create the MDE then that will reduce such
issues.
I'd also strongly suggest your network guy stage his upgrades. This
month Win 2003 Server. Next month or two SQL Server. Later for
Office. Besides those upgrades really don't care about the server.

Hmm, the more I think about this, if he really wants to do all those
upgrades at the same time, he's an utter idiot.


I think he was thinking that he would have to reinstall SQL Server after the
Windows upgrade, so he might as well install the new version.


FWIW SQL Server 2000 and 2005 can coexist quite nicely. See "named
instance" in the SQL BOL for more info. Essentially each named
instance it's own install of SQL Server right down to the DLLs. Very
nice for testing SP and patches, among other things. So let him
install SQL Server 2005 now on his current server. Big deal.

No, you really, really don't want to do too many upgrades at the same
time.
And, re.
upgrading Office, it was because he "had to touch each PC anyway" (his
words).
Why does he even need to touch each PC for a server upgrade? Touch
each users profile sure to setup the new server shares. Mind you
I'm not at all familiar with what is required in a corp environment.
Maybe that is indeed required.
And, yes, he is an utter idiot.


My sympathies.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 7 '06 #19

P: n/a
> I'm a bit confused. Somewhere else I read someone give advice that if a db
was developed in A2003 using A2003 format, that it couldn't be used in
A2002;
You must have miss-read that.
but if it was developed in A2003 using A2000 format, then it could be used
with A2002, since A2000 and A2002 share the same format. If A2002 and A2003
use the same format, then why couldn't an A2003 database in A2003 format be
used with A2002?
You can use a 03 with a 02....they are the same format.
since A2000 and A2002 share the same format


No, they are different formats for 00 and 02. It is actually 02 and 03 that
share the same format. (but, all 3 default to using the a2000 format).

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Feb 7 '06 #20

P: n/a

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
I'm a bit confused. Somewhere else I read someone give advice that if a
db was developed in A2003 using A2003 format, that it couldn't be used in
A2002;
You must have miss-read that.


It was a post by John Vinson on 7/16/04 that I found through Google Groups.
In it he wrote that as long as the database is in 2000 format, both 2002 and
2003 can use it. But if it's upgraded to 2003 format, then 2002 can't use
it. Here's the quote:

<anonym...@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:I have a small network set up using access 2002. I have added another
computer to the network. Do I need to continue with 2002 on the new
computer, can I use 2003 on the new computer and leave 2002 on the rest of
the network or do I need to upgrade all the computers to 2003?

The two versions are quite compatible; in fact both default to using
Access2000 format for their databases. It is possible to upgrade a
..mdb file to 2003 format, making it unusable for 2002 - so just don't
DO that. If you have already done so, use Tools... Convert... To
Previous Version to save the database in 2000/2002 format.

John W. Vinson[MVP]

(http://groups.google.com/group/micro...638f03bab6ceb6)

Neil

but if it was developed in A2003 using A2000 format, then it could be used
with A2002, since A2000 and A2002 share the same format. If A2002 and
A2003 use the same format, then why couldn't an A2003 database in A2003
format be used with A2002?


You can use a 03 with a 02....they are the same format.
since A2000 and A2002 share the same format


No, they are different formats for 00 and 02. It is actually 02 and 03
that share the same format. (but, all 3 default to using the a2000
format).

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal

Feb 8 '06 #21

P: n/a
>>One thing that concerns me, though: I've heard that there are potential
corruption issues when the db is developed and compiled in 2003 and then
opened in an earlier version (even with it being in 2000/2 format). I have
another client who is running Access 2003 and he would modify some forms
and
reports in the MDB and then send it back to me (MDB was kept in 2000
format). I would open it in A2000 and frequently one of the forms or
reports
that he modified was corrupted (could not open the code module for that
object). We stopped having him modify the MDB directly, but just send me
modified versions of the objects he changed, and the problem went away. So
I'm concerned about using A2003 but recompiling and distributing in A2002.
That's possible. I've been working in a similar environment recently
without any such issues.

But if you only use A2002 to create the MDE then that will reduce such
issues.


Right, except that there might be an issue when I first open it in A2002 for
recompile. But at least that would be before it got to the users. But if you
say you've been doing that without any problems, then that puts me at ease
somewhat. The above mentioned situation was from A2003 to A2000, not to
A2002, so that's different.
I'd also strongly suggest your network guy stage his upgrades. This
month Win 2003 Server. Next month or two SQL Server. Later for
Office. Besides those upgrades really don't care about the server.

Hmm, the more I think about this, if he really wants to do all those
upgrades at the same time, he's an utter idiot.
I think he was thinking that he would have to reinstall SQL Server after
the
Windows upgrade, so he might as well install the new version.


FWIW SQL Server 2000 and 2005 can coexist quite nicely. See "named
instance" in the SQL BOL for more info. Essentially each named
instance it's own install of SQL Server right down to the DLLs. Very
nice for testing SP and patches, among other things. So let him
install SQL Server 2005 now on his current server. Big deal.


Actually, we're using SQL 7. Can that co-exist with SQL 2005?
And, re.
upgrading Office, it was because he "had to touch each PC anyway" (his
words).


Why does he even need to touch each PC for a server upgrade? Touch
each users profile sure to setup the new server shares. Mind you
I'm not at all familiar with what is required in a corp environment.
Maybe that is indeed required.


I dunno. I'm not sure he knows either....
And, yes, he is an utter idiot.
My sympathies.


Thanks. Fortunately the project manager realizes this, so that's helpful.

Thanks,

Neil


Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm

Feb 8 '06 #22

P: n/a
> is possible to upgrade a
..mdb file to 2003 format, making it unusable for 2002

That is no doubt a type-o......

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Feb 8 '06 #23

P: n/a
Fixes in the database engine apply to A2002 (because the same database
engine is used)
Fixes in security apply to A2002. (because A2002 is still in support for
security fixes).

Since those are the only fixes that matter, all fixes that matter apply to
A2002.

A2003 SP2 also removed the ability to write
from Access to Excel. Since this is the result
of a Patent dispute, this is a more-or-less
compulsory patch for A2003 users. No similar
patch has been released for A2002.

(david)

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:5R*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
Also, I noticed that Access 2003 has SP2. I wonder if fixes in the new
2003 SPs would be propagated down to 2002 SPs. Probably not, would be my
guess (but, then again, perhaps they don't need to be).

N
I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe
if you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be
able to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right,
These fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to
save time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there is
a difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time, if not
in price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer


Feb 8 '06 #24

P: n/a
Well, don't mean to harp on it, but I think the context of the question and
of the answer, as well as the statement, "If you have already done so, use
Tools... Convert... To Previous Version to save the database in 2000/2002
format" indicates that he felt that 2000/2002 were the same format, and that
if the database had been converted to 2003 it would need to be converted
back to 2000/2002 format. If that's wrong, then fine; I'm glad that 2002 and
2003 are the same format. Makes the decision to go with 2002 instead of
insisting on 2003 easier. But just wanted to note that.

Neil
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:OG**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
is possible to upgrade a

.mdb file to 2003 format, making it unusable for 2002

That is no doubt a type-o......

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal

Feb 8 '06 #25

P: n/a
Thanks for that explanation.

"david epsom dot com dot au" <david@epsomdotcomdotau> wrote in message
news:43***********************@lon-reader.news.telstra.net...
Fixes in the database engine apply to A2002 (because the same database
engine is used)
Fixes in security apply to A2002. (because A2002 is still in support for
security fixes).

Since those are the only fixes that matter, all fixes that matter apply to
A2002.

A2003 SP2 also removed the ability to write
from Access to Excel. Since this is the result
of a Patent dispute, this is a more-or-less
compulsory patch for A2003 users. No similar
patch has been released for A2002.

(david)

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:5R*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
Also, I noticed that Access 2003 has SP2. I wonder if fixes in the new
2003 SPs would be propagated down to 2002 SPs. Probably not, would be my
guess (but, then again, perhaps they don't need to be).

N
I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe
if you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be
able to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right,
These fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to
save time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there is
a difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time, if
not in price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer



Feb 8 '06 #26

P: n/a
> Note that most of your users only need the runtime version of Access.
Your power users who create queries will want a full version of
Access. Furthermore you can easily use the new features of Access but
create A2002 MDEs (using A2002) to distribute to your users.


I'm intrigued by this idea of using the A2003 runtime, and have a couple
more questions.

1) Would there be any performance differences between using the A2003
runtime and using the A2003 full version?

2) If A2002 and A2003 share the same file format, and if the db is in that
file format, why would the users need the A2003 runtime? If they have Access
2002 as part of Office Pro, wouldn't they be able to run the file in the
A2002/3 format?

Thanks!

Neil
Feb 8 '06 #27

P: n/a
I spoke too soon. Office XP SP3 Patch includes the
Access/Excel patch, and is required for all
installations of Office XP (unless you want to
wander off into the darkness of unsupported dodgy
software).

That is, the Access/Excel patch applies to both
Access 2002 and Access 2003.

(david)

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:V4*****************@newsread3.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
Thanks for that explanation.

"david epsom dot com dot au" <david@epsomdotcomdotau> wrote in message
news:43***********************@lon-reader.news.telstra.net...
Fixes in the database engine apply to A2002 (because the same database
engine is used)
Fixes in security apply to A2002. (because A2002 is still in support for
security fixes).

Since those are the only fixes that matter, all fixes that matter apply
to A2002.

A2003 SP2 also removed the ability to write
from Access to Excel. Since this is the result
of a Patent dispute, this is a more-or-less
compulsory patch for A2003 users. No similar
patch has been released for A2002.

(david)

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:5R*****************@newsread1.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
Also, I noticed that Access 2003 has SP2. I wonder if fixes in the new
2003 SPs would be propagated down to 2002 SPs. Probably not, would be my
guess (but, then again, perhaps they don't need to be).

N

I am not sure what the fixes are, but they were major fixes. I believe
if you go to Microsoft Office's site and then to Access, you should be
able to search for what the fixes have been. The network guy is right,
These fixes from 2002 to 2003 will be as service packs for 2002, but to
save time, 2003 would be quicker.

It is all a matter of time vs possible price. I am not sure if there
is a difference in price but if there is, you would pay through time,
if not in price.

--
Joe Obergfell
Web Developer



Feb 8 '06 #28

P: n/a
Access 2003 did not introduce any new file format, just a change in
terminology - what used to be called 'Access 2002' format is now known as
'Access 2002/2003' format. There is Access 2000 format, and there is Access
2002/2003 format. There is no '2000/2002' format.

--
Brendan Reynolds
Access MVP

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:X3****************@newsread3.news.pas.earthli nk.net...
Well, don't mean to harp on it, but I think the context of the question
and of the answer, as well as the statement, "If you have already done so,
use Tools... Convert... To Previous Version to save the database in
2000/2002 format" indicates that he felt that 2000/2002 were the same
format, and that if the database had been converted to 2003 it would need
to be converted back to 2000/2002 format. If that's wrong, then fine; I'm
glad that 2002 and 2003 are the same format. Makes the decision to go with
2002 instead of insisting on 2003 easier. But just wanted to note that.

Neil
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:OG**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
is possible to upgrade a

.mdb file to 2003 format, making it unusable for 2002

That is no doubt a type-o......

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal


Feb 8 '06 #29

P: n/a
OK, thanks for confirming that.

"Brendan Reynolds" <br******@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Access 2003 did not introduce any new file format, just a change in
terminology - what used to be called 'Access 2002' format is now known as
'Access 2002/2003' format. There is Access 2000 format, and there is
Access 2002/2003 format. There is no '2000/2002' format.

--
Brendan Reynolds
Access MVP

"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:X3****************@newsread3.news.pas.earthli nk.net...
Well, don't mean to harp on it, but I think the context of the question
and of the answer, as well as the statement, "If you have already done
so, use Tools... Convert... To Previous Version to save the database in
2000/2002 format" indicates that he felt that 2000/2002 were the same
format, and that if the database had been converted to 2003 it would need
to be converted back to 2000/2002 format. If that's wrong, then fine; I'm
glad that 2002 and 2003 are the same format. Makes the decision to go
with 2002 instead of insisting on 2003 easier. But just wanted to note
that.

Neil
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:OG**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
is possible to upgrade a
.mdb file to 2003 format, making it unusable for 2002

That is no doubt a type-o......

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal



Feb 8 '06 #30

P: n/a
Albert, one other question: if 2002 and 2003 share the same file format,
then one assumes that a 2003 database in that shared format could be used in
2002. But how does one know which 2003 features (such as themed controls)
are available in 2002 if a database developed in 2003 is used in 2002?

Thanks,

Neil

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:u0**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
We are also looking to do a fair amount of redevelopment of our
application, and I want to do it in 2003.


I also like 2003. Things like themed controls make the software look a LOT
better. here is some screen shots of what I mean

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...icles/Grid.htm

and

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...heme/index.htm

Am I right for insisting on Access 2003 over 2002, or is there not that
much of a difference? If there is a significant difference, what can I
say
in support of getting licenses for Access 2003?


No, you are not. I can't see any good reason, or argument to upgrade here.
The only reason would be that you "like" a2003 better.....

There is little, if any changes in terms of support for sql server....so,
no, there is no big real argument here that I can make a case.

However, see below for a2003 features (this is a reposted message)

Also, here is a fabulous post by MVP John Viescas on this
very subject late last year.

(This was comparing Access 2003 to 2002).
They didn't make any major changes. Here's a summary:

View information on object dependencies

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can view information
on dependencies between database objects. Viewing a list
of objects that use a specific object helps maintain a
database over time and avoid errors related to missing
record sources. For example, the Quarterly Orders query in
the Sales database is no longer needed, but before
deleting it, you might want to find out which other
objects in the database use the query. Then, you could
either change the record source of the dependent objects,
or delete them, before deleting the Quarterly Orders
query. Viewing a complete list of dependent objects helps
you save time and minimize errors.

In addition to viewing the list of objects that are bound
to a selected object, you can also view the objects that
are being used by the selected object.

Macros, modules, and data access pages are not searched
for dependencies. Access projects do not support this
feature.

Error checking in forms and reports

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can enable automatic
error checking for common errors in forms and reports.
Error checking points out errors, such as two controls
using the same keyboard shortcut, and the width of a report
being greater than the page it will be printed on.
Enabling error checking helps you identify errors and
correct them.

Propagating field properties

In previous versions of Microsoft Access, whenever you
modified a field's inherited property, you had to manually
modify the property of the corresponding control in each
of the forms and reports. Now, when you modify an
inherited field property in Table design view, Access
displays an option to update the property of all or some
controls that are bound to the field.

Smart tags

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can use the SmartTags
property to add a smart tag to any field in a table,
query, form, report, or data access page in a database.

Back up a database or project

You can back up the current database or project before
making major changes to it. The backup will be saved in
the default backup location, or in the current folder.

To restore a database, go to the location of the backup,
rename the file, and open it in Access.

Windows XP theme support

The Microsoft Windows XP operating system offers you
several themes. If you have chosen a theme other than the
default, Access will apply the chosen theme to views,
dialog boxes, and controls. You can prevent form controls
from inheriting themes from the operating system by
setting an option on the database or project.

Improved sorting in controls

You can now specify the ascending or descending sort order
of up to four fields in the List Box and Combo Box Wizards
in forms and reports, and the Lookup Wizard in an Access
database. The sort page added to these wizards looks and
behaves like the sort page in the Report Wizard.

Autocorrect options

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you have more control
over the behavior of the AutoCorrect feature. The
AutoCorrect Options button appears near text that was
automatically corrected. If you find on occasion that you
don't want text to be corrected, you can undo a correction
or turn AutoCorrect options on or off by clicking the
button and making a selection.

Enhanced font capabilities in SQL views

In the SQL and query Design views of a query in both a
Microsoft Access database and Microsoft Access project,
you can now change the font and font size of the text by
using the Query design font option added to the
Tables/Queries tab of the Options dialog box under the
Tools menu. These settings apply to all databases and work
with the high-contrast and other accessibility settings of
your computer.

Context-based Help in SQL view

In the SQL view of a query in a Microsoft Access database,
you can now get help specific to Jet SQL keywords, VBA
functions, and Access functions. Simply press F1 to bring
up the help that corresponds to the text near the cursor.
You can also search the Jet SQL and VBA function reference
topics.

Importing, exporting, and linking

Importing, exporting, and linking to a Microsoft Windows
SharePoint Services list from Access

You can perform the following operations with a Windows
SharePoint Services list:

?Export the contents of a table or a query to a list.

?Import the contents of a list into a table.

?Link a table to a list.

Exporting and linking to Access data from Windows
SharePoint Services

You can now export a list in its Datasheet view from
Windows SharePoint Services to a static table or to a
linked table in Access. When you export to a static table,
you create a table in Access. You can then view and make
changes to the table independent of the original list in
Windows SharePoint Services. Similarly, you can change the
list in Windows SharePoint Services, and that will not
affect the table in Access.

When you export to a linked table, you create a table in
Access and establish a dynamic link between the table and
the list such that changes to the table are reflected in
the list, and changes to the list are reflected in the
table as well.

Make a local table from a linked table

In Microsoft Office Access 2003, you can make a local copy
of the structure or data and structure contained in a
linked table.

XML support

With the enhanced XML support in Microsoft Office Access
2003, you can specify a transform file when you import
data from or export data to XML. The transform is then
applied automatically. When you import XML data, the
transform is applied to the data as soon as the data is
imported, before any new table is created or an existing
one is appended to. When you export data to XML, the
transform is applied following the export operation.

Often times a database contains lookup values that are
stored in another database. You can now include these
related tables when exporting. You can also include any
predefined filter or sort order for an object when
exporting the object.

Security enhancements

Macro Security Microsoft Office Access 2003 allows you to
protect against potentially unsafe Visual Basic for
Applications (VBA) code by setting the macro security
level. You can set the security level so that you are
prompted every time that you open a database containing
VBA code, or you can automatically block databases that
are from unknown sources.

Additionally, Access uses Microsoft Authenticode
technology to enable you to digitally sign a macro project
by using a digital certificate. The certificate used to
create this signature confirms that the macro originated
from the signer, and the signature confirms that it has
not been altered. When you set the macro security level,
you can run macros based on whether they are digitally
signed by a developer on your list of trusted sources.

Block Potentially Unsafe Functions Access utilizes the
Microsoft Jet Expression Service enhanced sandbox mode to
block potentially unsafe functions from being used in
expressions.


Feb 8 '06 #31

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
One thing that concerns me, though: I've heard that there are potential
corruption issues when the db is developed and compiled in 2003 and then
opened in an earlier version (even with it being in 2000/2 format). I have
another client who is running Access 2003 and he would modify some forms
and
reports in the MDB and then send it back to me (MDB was kept in 2000
format). I would open it in A2000 and frequently one of the forms or
reports
that he modified was corrupted (could not open the code module for that
object). We stopped having him modify the MDB directly, but just send me
modified versions of the objects he changed, and the problem went away. So
I'm concerned about using A2003 but recompiling and distributing in A2002.


That's possible. I've been working in a similar environment recently
without any such issues.

But if you only use A2002 to create the MDE then that will reduce such
issues.


Right, except that there might be an issue when I first open it in A2002 for
recompile. But at least that would be before it got to the users. But if you
say you've been doing that without any problems, then that puts me at ease
somewhat. The above mentioned situation was from A2003 to A2000, not to
A2002, so that's different.


Yes, I and a client IT person have been working A2003 for the past six
months and creating A2002 MDEs. Yes, A2000 is different but I don't
anticipate many problems
I'd also strongly suggest your network guy stage his upgrades. This
month Win 2003 Server. Next month or two SQL Server. Later for
Office. Besides those upgrades really don't care about the server.

Hmm, the more I think about this, if he really wants to do all those
upgrades at the same time, he's an utter idiot.

I think he was thinking that he would have to reinstall SQL Server after
the
Windows upgrade, so he might as well install the new version.


FWIW SQL Server 2000 and 2005 can coexist quite nicely. See "named
instance" in the SQL BOL for more info. Essentially each named
instance it's own install of SQL Server right down to the DLLs. Very
nice for testing SP and patches, among other things. So let him
install SQL Server 2005 now on his current server. Big deal.


Actually, we're using SQL 7. Can that co-exist with SQL 2005?


I'm pretty sure it can. I'm also pretty sure SQL 7 doesn't support
named instances.
And, yes, he is an utter idiot.

My sympathies.

Thanks. Fortunately the project manager realizes this, so that's helpful.


Let us hope he doesn't monitor Google groups <smile>

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 8 '06 #32

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
Note that most of your users only need the runtime version of Access.
Your power users who create queries will want a full version of
Access. Furthermore you can easily use the new features of Access but
create A2002 MDEs (using A2002) to distribute to your users.
I'm intrigued by this idea of using the A2003 runtime, and have a couple
more questions.

1) Would there be any performance differences between using the A2003
runtime and using the A2003 full version?


No.
2) If A2002 and A2003 share the same file format, and if the db is in that
file format, why would the users need the A2003 runtime? If they have Access
2002 as part of Office Pro, wouldn't they be able to run the file in the
A2002/3 format?


Yes. but.

1) You'd likely want to give the users an MDE so make sure you create
it in A2002.

2) I was thinking in terms of saving your organization licensing fees
if you wanted to go to A2003 or Access ver next. Why buy 100
licenses of A2003 if all you need is a few for yourself, a few others
in the IT department and the power users and the ODE/MOD/ADE/runtime.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 8 '06 #33

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
Well, don't mean to harp on it, but I think the context of the question and
of the answer, as well as the statement, "If you have already done so, use
Tools... Convert... To Previous Version to save the database in 2000/2002
format" indicates that he felt that 2000/2002 were the same format, and that
if the database had been converted to 2003 it would need to be converted
back to 2000/2002 format. If that's wrong, then fine; I'm glad that 2002 and
2003 are the same format. Makes the decision to go with 2002 instead of
insisting on 2003 easier. But just wanted to note that.


But note that A2002 can't run an A2003 created MDE.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 8 '06 #34

P: n/a
GH
Can you provide a link to where you found that Access cannot write to
Excel? I looked for this on Microsoft's site, and I could not find a
specific reference to it. This is an important issue for some of my
work, so please provide a link. Thanks!

- GH

Feb 8 '06 #35

P: n/a
> .....Access cannot write to Excel?
Is a gross overstatement. It only involves the updating of spreadsheets that
are set up as linked tables within Access, and even then the limitation is
one-way.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904953/

Describes the issues and workarounds.

"...Because of legal issues, Microsoft has disabled the functionality in
Access 2003 and in Access 2002 that let users change the data in linked
tables that point to a range in an Excel workbook. However, when you make
changes directly in the Excel workbook, the changes appear in the linked
table in Access....."

Article includes links to:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/887616/ Office 2003 SP2 (released Sep 27
2005)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904018/ Access 2002/XP update (dated Oct 18
2005)

Anyone with Automatic Updates activated has been living with this for
several months.

HTH,
--
George Nicholson

Remove 'Junk' from return address.
"GH" <bo**************@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Can you provide a link to where you found that Access cannot write to
Excel? I looked for this on Microsoft's site, and I could not find a
specific reference to it. This is an important issue for some of my
work, so please provide a link. Thanks!

- GH

Feb 8 '06 #36

P: n/a
>>> FWIW SQL Server 2000 and 2005 can coexist quite nicely. See "named
instance" in the SQL BOL for more info. Essentially each named
instance it's own install of SQL Server right down to the DLLs. Very
nice for testing SP and patches, among other things. So let him
install SQL Server 2005 now on his current server. Big deal.


Actually, we're using SQL 7. Can that co-exist with SQL 2005?


I'm pretty sure it can. I'm also pretty sure SQL 7 doesn't support
named instances.


If SQL 7 doesn't support named instances, any tricks I should know to get it
to run simultaneously with SQL 2005? (Or if it's too much of a hassle, we
could just wait with the 2005 upgrade and just reinstall SQL 7 on the new
server.)
And, yes, he is an utter idiot.
My sympathies.

Thanks. Fortunately the project manager realizes this, so that's helpful.


Let us hope he doesn't monitor Google groups <smile>


Eh, it wouldn't be anything he doesn't already know. ;-)

N
Feb 9 '06 #37

P: n/a
>>2) If A2002 and A2003 share the same file format, and if the db is in that
file format, why would the users need the A2003 runtime? If they have
Access
2002 as part of Office Pro, wouldn't they be able to run the file in the
A2002/3 format?


Yes. but.

1) You'd likely want to give the users an MDE so make sure you create
it in A2002.

2) I was thinking in terms of saving your organization licensing fees
if you wanted to go to A2003 or Access ver next. Why buy 100
licenses of A2003 if all you need is a few for yourself, a few others
in the IT department and the power users and the ODE/MOD/ADE/runtime.


Yes, definitely. That is a good idea. What I'm still not clear on is why
A2002 can't run an A2003 MDB if they both share the same file format.

Thanks,

Neil
Feb 9 '06 #38

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
FWIW SQL Server 2000 and 2005 can coexist quite nicely. See "named
instance" in the SQL BOL for more info. Essentially each named
instance it's own install of SQL Server right down to the DLLs. Very
nice for testing SP and patches, among other things. So let him
install SQL Server 2005 now on his current server. Big deal.

Actually, we're using SQL 7. Can that co-exist with SQL 2005?


I'm pretty sure it can. I'm also pretty sure SQL 7 doesn't support
named instances.


If SQL 7 doesn't support named instances, any tricks I should know to get it
to run simultaneously with SQL 2005? (Or if it's too much of a hassle, we
could just wait with the 2005 upgrade and just reinstall SQL 7 on the new
server.)


SQL Server 7 will install in parallel with SQL Server 2000 and 2005 on
the same system. (Note that I haven't done this personally but I've
read it works and I have great faith in the SQL Server team and MVPs
that this works as advertised. <smile>)

So my mentioning that SQL Server 7 doesn't support named instances is
misleading in our discussion.
>And, yes, he is an utter idiot.
My sympathies.
Thanks. Fortunately the project manager realizes this, so that's helpful.


Let us hope he doesn't monitor Google groups <smile>


Eh, it wouldn't be anything he doesn't already know. ;-)


By he I meant the IT person not the project manager.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 9 '06 #39

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
Yes, definitely. That is a good idea. What I'm still not clear on is why
A2002 can't run an A2003 MDB if they both share the same file format.


A2002 can run an A2003 MDB. A2002 would have to recompile the MDB
first though. Or it might be in a partially compiled state.

Many people though only distribute MDEs to the users so the users
can't muck with things or take the MDB home as it is the intellectual
property of the corp.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 9 '06 #40

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:v1*****************@newsread3.news.pas.earthl ink.net...
Albert, one other question: if 2002 and 2003 share the same file format,
then one assumes that a 2003 database in that shared format could be used
in 2002. But how does one know which 2003 features (such as themed
controls) are available in 2002 if a database developed in 2003 is used in
2002?


For the most part, it does not come into play. I suppose trying to turn on
themes in a2002 would cause a trappable error.

Further, in a multi version environment and a multi-user environment, I
would still deploy a mde file to each user. This thus assumes a split
database.....

I do speak about splitting in the following article on how to run ms-access
in a multi-user environment.

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...plit/index.htm

I should also note that even when I develop, or work on a clients database
in a2000 format (and they are using a2000), I STRONGLY recommend that you
decompile the mdb file BEFORE deploying to the clients machine..and then
re-compile on their machine (there is some compile binary differences...and
thus you need to still take MUCH care as to deploying on target computers).
--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal

Feb 9 '06 #41

P: n/a
> 2) If A2002 and A2003 share the same file format, and if the db is in that
file format, why would the users need the A2003 runtime? If they have
Access 2002 as part of Office Pro, wouldn't they be able to run the file
in the A2002/3 format?


because you can ONLY create a MDE file in with the version of ms-access that
you have.

So, a2002 can ONLY create a mde for 2002, and a2000 can only create a mde
for a2000.

Apparently, people have noted that a 2002, or 2003 mde will work with the
a2003 runtime system...(but, I have not verified this myself).

You don't *have* to use a mde with the runtime..but as general development
approach, you should always distribute a mde file to the end users.

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal
Feb 9 '06 #42

P: n/a
"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote:
because you can ONLY create a MDE file in with the version of ms-access that
you have.

So, a2002 can ONLY create a mde for 2002, and a2000 can only create a mde
for a2000.
Someone, somewhere is selling a $15 utility which can do this. I
suspect they've managed to figure out the syscmds function all.
Apparently, people have noted that a 2002, or 2003 mde will work with the
a2003 runtime system...(but, I have not verified this myself).


As should an A2000 MDE.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Feb 9 '06 #43

P: n/a
We are distributing an A2000 mde to A2003 installations.
It works well now, but it didn't seem to work at first.

Either we were just unlucky at first, (possible) or else
subsequent service packs have harmonised the A2000 and
A2003 PC's.

(david)

"Albert D.Kallal" <Pl*******************@msn.com> wrote in message
news:OO*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
2) If A2002 and A2003 share the same file format, and if the db is in
that file format, why would the users need the A2003 runtime? If they
have Access 2002 as part of Office Pro, wouldn't they be able to run the
file in the A2002/3 format?


because you can ONLY create a MDE file in with the version of ms-access
that you have.

So, a2002 can ONLY create a mde for 2002, and a2000 can only create a mde
for a2000.

Apparently, people have noted that a 2002, or 2003 mde will work with the
a2003 runtime system...(but, I have not verified this myself).

You don't *have* to use a mde with the runtime..but as general
development approach, you should always distribute a mde file to the end
users.

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com
http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKallal

Feb 10 '06 #44

P: n/a
> Is a gross overstatement.

....It's possible that I just had an unrelated failure. it
stopped working for me when I installed the patch, and
it worked again when I repaired the registry entry.

Can you confirm that this works for you? (using any existing
table at the end of the string)

codedb.execute "select * into [Excel 8.0;DATABASE=c:\tmp.xls].[fred] from
myTable"

(david)
"George Nicholson" <Ju*********@msn.com> wrote in message
news:un**************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
.....Access cannot write to Excel?

Is a gross overstatement. It only involves the updating of spreadsheets
that are set up as linked tables within Access, and even then the
limitation is one-way.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904953/

Describes the issues and workarounds.

"...Because of legal issues, Microsoft has disabled the functionality in
Access 2003 and in Access 2002 that let users change the data in linked
tables that point to a range in an Excel workbook. However, when you make
changes directly in the Excel workbook, the changes appear in the linked
table in Access....."

Article includes links to:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/887616/ Office 2003 SP2 (released Sep 27
2005)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904018/ Access 2002/XP update (dated Oct
18 2005)

Anyone with Automatic Updates activated has been living with this for
several months.

HTH,
--
George Nicholson

Remove 'Junk' from return address.
"GH" <bo**************@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Can you provide a link to where you found that Access cannot write to
Excel? I looked for this on Microsoft's site, and I could not find a
specific reference to it. This is an important issue for some of my
work, so please provide a link. Thanks!

- GH


Feb 10 '06 #45

P: n/a
> SQL Server 7 will install in parallel with SQL Server 2000 and 2005 on
the same system. (Note that I haven't done this personally but I've
read it works and I have great faith in the SQL Server team and MVPs
that this works as advertised. <smile>)

So my mentioning that SQL Server 7 doesn't support named instances is
misleading in our discussion.


OK, good to know. Thanks.
>>And, yes, he is an utter idiot.
> My sympathies.
Thanks. Fortunately the project manager realizes this, so that's
helpful.

Let us hope he doesn't monitor Google groups <smile>


Eh, it wouldn't be anything he doesn't already know. ;-)


By he I meant the IT person not the project manager.


Yes, that's who I meant too. I'm sure he already knows he's an utter idiot.
:-)

N
Feb 13 '06 #46

P: n/a
OK, thanks.

"Tony Toews" <tt****@telusplanet.net> wrote in message
news:cn********************************@4ax.com...
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote:
Yes, definitely. That is a good idea. What I'm still not clear on is why
A2002 can't run an A2003 MDB if they both share the same file format.


A2002 can run an A2003 MDB. A2002 would have to recompile the MDB
first though. Or it might be in a partially compiled state.

Many people though only distribute MDEs to the users so the users
can't muck with things or take the MDB home as it is the intellectual
property of the corp.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm

Feb 13 '06 #47

P: n/a
GH
George,

Thanks for the additional information. Linked Excel versus exporting
or writing to Excel in general are not quite the same thing, so I guess
my projects are good for now. We build all kinds of Excel
spreadsheets, but we don't use linked Excel "tables" to do so. I also
appreciate the links to Microsoft's articles on the changes.

- GH

Feb 15 '06 #48

P: n/a
I have been asked about this at work. I'm a little confused. Some
places say that only linking to an excel spreadsheet causes the
problem, but elsewhere it says specially linked to a named range in an
spreadsheet.

My Access version is SP3, Version 10.6501.6626. I created an excel
spreadsheet with a named range, linked to it from Access 2002 (Access
2000 file format) and was able to update the information in the named
range no problem.

What am I missing I wonder?

Joel
George Nicholson wrote:
.....Access cannot write to Excel?

Is a gross overstatement. It only involves the updating of spreadsheets that
are set up as linked tables within Access, and even then the limitation is
one-way.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904953/

Describes the issues and workarounds.

"...Because of legal issues, Microsoft has disabled the functionality in
Access 2003 and in Access 2002 that let users change the data in linked
tables that point to a range in an Excel workbook. However, when you make
changes directly in the Excel workbook, the changes appear in the linked
table in Access....."

Article includes links to:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/887616/ Office 2003 SP2 (released Sep 27
2005)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904018/ Access 2002/XP update (dated Oct 18
2005)

Anyone with Automatic Updates activated has been living with this for
several months.

HTH,
--
George Nicholson

Remove 'Junk' from return address.


Feb 16 '06 #49

P: n/a
What you would appear to be missing is KB904018, as mentioned in the article
to which George pointed you.

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
(no e-mails, please!)
<Gi*************@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g44g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
I have been asked about this at work. I'm a little confused. Some
places say that only linking to an excel spreadsheet causes the
problem, but elsewhere it says specially linked to a named range in an
spreadsheet.

My Access version is SP3, Version 10.6501.6626. I created an excel
spreadsheet with a named range, linked to it from Access 2002 (Access
2000 file format) and was able to update the information in the named
range no problem.

What am I missing I wonder?

Joel
George Nicholson wrote:
.....Access cannot write to Excel?

Is a gross overstatement. It only involves the updating of spreadsheets that are set up as linked tables within Access, and even then the limitation is one-way.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904953/

Describes the issues and workarounds.

"...Because of legal issues, Microsoft has disabled the functionality in
Access 2003 and in Access 2002 that let users change the data in linked
tables that point to a range in an Excel workbook. However, when you make changes directly in the Excel workbook, the changes appear in the linked
table in Access....."

Article includes links to:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/887616/ Office 2003 SP2 (released Sep 27 2005)
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/904018/ Access 2002/XP update (dated Oct 18 2005)

Anyone with Automatic Updates activated has been living with this for
several months.

HTH,
--
George Nicholson

Remove 'Junk' from return address.

Feb 16 '06 #50

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