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Add column color in datasheet view

P: n/a
In sheet view (like a query), is the a way to add color to specific
columns (like some red and some green?) or cells? Not in a form, but
in a sheet view? So say I had a query and I wanted to perform some
conditional formatting (say format all the blanks cells red so the
user could find them and add data to them)
Jerry
Jan 3 '06 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
The answer is pretty much no. But--you can get a form to look exactly
like a Datasheet, and THAT you can color-code.

Jan 3 '06 #2

P: n/a
Red
Hehehe... or, worse comes to wors,e you can always export it to excel
and make it pretty :D

Jan 3 '06 #3

P: n/a
But you can't make editing changes on forms, and have those changes
propagate back to the tables were built on, can you??
Jerry
On 3 Jan 2006 11:19:37 -0800, "KitKat" <ki***********@gmail.com>
wrote:
The answer is pretty much no. But--you can get a form to look exactly
like a Datasheet, and THAT you can color-code.


Jan 3 '06 #4

P: n/a
Red
o.O

Yeah, forms will update your records in your tables....
If you need help on creating your special form, just ask :D

Jan 3 '06 #5

P: n/a

<je*********@pioneer.com> wrote in message
news:dm********************************@4ax.com...
But you can't make editing changes on forms, and have those changes
propagate back to the tables were built on, can you??
Jerry

Course you can.
Whole idea in Access is that tables and queries are not seen directly.
The form is the visible bit you see on the screen
David B
Jan 3 '06 #6

P: n/a
If you edit colors or other visual aspects of the data on a form, no,
the changes will not propagate back to the table...if that's what you
were asking. As David B. said, forms usually provide a user interface
for queries and tables. As long as the form is bound to a table, or if
you have VBA code to update a table with the form's values, any changes
you make to the data will go directly to the table.

Jan 3 '06 #7

P: n/a
I will give it a try
I think I now know what to do
Build a form, put conditional formatting on the object(s), then
display in datasheet view.

I took Datapig's course and now I'm an Access jock :) ...I know
enough to be dangerous.

Thanks People
Jerry
On Tue, 3 Jan 2006 19:31:17 -0000, "David B"
<da***@marleycote.nospamfsnet.co.uk> wrote:

<je*********@pioneer.com> wrote in message
news:dm********************************@4ax.com.. .
But you can't make editing changes on forms, and have those changes
propagate back to the tables were built on, can you??
Jerry

Course you can.
Whole idea in Access is that tables and queries are not seen directly.
The form is the visible bit you see on the screen
David B


Jan 3 '06 #8

P: n/a
Yep I got the form to work..

Now I've got a conditional formatting question..I want all cells of a
data field (onthe form) that are null (no date entered) to be PINK in
the form so the user knows that I need DATA there. Ther eis no "is
null" option in the conditional formatting dialog.I'vebeen able to sue
conditional formatting to do other things in the data sheet, but not
this so far
Jerry

If you edit colors or other visual aspects of the data on a form, no,
the changes will not propagate back to the table...if that's what you
were asking. As David B. said, forms usually provide a user interface
for queries and tables. As long as the form is bound to a table, or if
you have VBA code to update a table with the form's values, any changes
you make to the data will go directly to the table.


Jan 3 '06 #9

P: n/a
Using VBA in the OnLoad event of the form, you could check to see if
the textboxes are null. Keep in mind this is only one way to do it and
I'm sure the other folks here have easier methods.

VBA code:
(for each textbox you wish to check)
If IsNull(txtBox1) Then
txtBox1.BackColor= 'Whatever the color is for your shade of pink. This
is aircode.
Else
txtBox1.BackColor= 'Whatever you want the color to be when data is
there.
End If

If you want to test each textbox on your form, you can use the
Form.Controls collection to iterate through and check them all. The
usefulness of the code above varies with the number of textboxes you're
testing.

Jan 3 '06 #10

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