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Problem with FROM Clause in Query

P: n/a
I'm creating a query, which I want to use in code in my VB.NET app.
This query produces the correct results when executed in Access:

SELECT tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT, Query11.RID, Query11.LName,
Query11.FName, Query11.MI FROM tblEncounters INNER JOIN Query11 ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

Query11 looks like this:

SELECT tblCases.RID, tblCases.LName, tblCases.FName, tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum
FROM tblCases INNER JOIN [SELECT [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status], Count([Status]) AS TotComplete FROM
tblRecipients INNER JOIN tblEncounters ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID] WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1)) GROUP BY [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]]. AS Query8 ON (tblCases.TotalNum =
Query8.TotComplete) AND (tblCases.RID = Query8.RID);

Now to get the first query I have listed to work in code (i.e. to not
be referring to a named query in Access), I tried doing this:

SELECT tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT, Query11.RID, Query11.LName,
Query11.FName, Query11.MI FROM tblEncounters INNER JOIN (SELECT
tblCases.RID, tblCases.LName, tblCases.FName, tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum FROM tblCases INNER JOIN [SELECT
[tblRecipients].[RID], [tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status], Count([Status]) AS TotComplete FROM
tblRecipients INNER JOIN tblEncounters ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID] WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1)) GROUP BY [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]]. AS Query8 ON (tblCases.TotalNum =
Query8.TotComplete) AND (tblCases.RID = Query8.RID)) As Query11 ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

I get the message "SYNTAX error in FROM clause." For the life of me, I
cannot figure out where the error is at. I've done this sort of thing
before--create a query and use it in another query and then take the
SQL and do the "As Query. . ." (like I did for Query8).

What I'm trying to do is create a report that shows the number of
completed cases (not an Access report). A person can have multiple
encounters and an encounter is completed when the status field has a 1
in it. A case is considered complete for a person when ALL of their
encounters has a 1 in the status field so I compare the total number of
encounters a person has against the total number of encounters for a
person that has a 1 in the status field.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Molly J. Fagan
Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality

Nov 17 '05 #1
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21 Replies


P: n/a
Well I can see a couple of errors in there

If you lay out SQL statements and use Aliases it becomes much easier to read
them and debug them so just laying out your SQL statement we get

SELECT
tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT,
Query11.RID,
Query11.LName,
Query11.FName,
Query11.MI
FROM
tblEncounters
INNER JOIN
(
SELECT
tblCases.RID,
tblCases.LName,
tblCases.FName,
tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum
FROM
tblCases
INNER JOIN
[
SELECT
[tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName],
[tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status],
Count([Status]) AS TotComplete
FROM
tblRecipients
INNER JOIN
tblEncounters
ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID]
WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1))
GROUP BY
[tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName],
[tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]
]. AS Query8
ON
(tblCases.TotalNum = Query8.TotComplete)
AND
(tblCases.RID = Query8.RID)
) As Query11
ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

We can then see that
just after the second INNER JOIN line you've enclosed the SELECT
statement in [ ] instead of ( )
just after the closing ] (just before AS Query8) you have a spurious '.'
(full stop or period)

--
Terry Kreft

<mo****@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegro ups.com...
I'm creating a query, which I want to use in code in my VB.NET app.
This query produces the correct results when executed in Access:

SELECT tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT, Query11.RID, Query11.LName,
Query11.FName, Query11.MI FROM tblEncounters INNER JOIN Query11 ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

Query11 looks like this:

SELECT tblCases.RID, tblCases.LName, tblCases.FName, tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum
FROM tblCases INNER JOIN [SELECT [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status], Count([Status]) AS TotComplete FROM
tblRecipients INNER JOIN tblEncounters ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID] WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1)) GROUP BY [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]]. AS Query8 ON (tblCases.TotalNum =
Query8.TotComplete) AND (tblCases.RID = Query8.RID);

Now to get the first query I have listed to work in code (i.e. to not
be referring to a named query in Access), I tried doing this:

SELECT tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT, Query11.RID, Query11.LName,
Query11.FName, Query11.MI FROM tblEncounters INNER JOIN (SELECT
tblCases.RID, tblCases.LName, tblCases.FName, tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum FROM tblCases INNER JOIN [SELECT
[tblRecipients].[RID], [tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status], Count([Status]) AS TotComplete FROM
tblRecipients INNER JOIN tblEncounters ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID] WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1)) GROUP BY [tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName], [tblRecipients].[FName], [tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]]. AS Query8 ON (tblCases.TotalNum =
Query8.TotComplete) AND (tblCases.RID = Query8.RID)) As Query11 ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

I get the message "SYNTAX error in FROM clause." For the life of me, I
cannot figure out where the error is at. I've done this sort of thing
before--create a query and use it in another query and then take the
SQL and do the "As Query. . ." (like I did for Query8).

What I'm trying to do is create a report that shows the number of
completed cases (not an Access report). A person can have multiple
encounters and an encounter is completed when the status field has a 1
in it. A case is considered complete for a person when ALL of their
encounters has a 1 in the status field so I compare the total number of
encounters a person has against the total number of encounters for a
person that has a 1 in the status field.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Molly J. Fagan
Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality

Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Terry

I'm confused.

In JET, I have used

[some select string]. AS name

to effect subqueries in SQL strings

for a long time. (I didn't invent this by any means, but I may have
championed it).

I believe that in T-SQL we can just use

(some select string) AS name

OP states that the query with []. AS name does work in Access.

So, can I assume that there is something in OP's post which indicated
he's not sending this query string to JET in his .NET application
(maybe it's just that: ".NET"?), or does .NET send ANSI SQL to JET and
[]. As name isn't allowed there or what?

I'm confused.

Oh, I already said that.

OK, I'm very confused!

Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
Lyle,
The SQL I worked on was the one the OP had compounded to get rid of the
original query, I don't believe this is the one they stated was working in
Access I think the OP was referring to the first statements with respect to
this. In summary they aren't saying the SQL worked in Access and therefore
aren't saying the [] delimiter worked.

[] used to delimit a sub-query; I've not seen this before so I tested it, I
can't get it to work without error in either Access as a query or ADO, in
both cases an error is returned i.e.
"The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table or query
'SELECT * FROM YourTable'.
Make sure it exists and that its name is spelled correctly."

BTW 'SELECT * FROM YourTable' is the subquery text held in t [].
--
Terry Kreft

"lylefair" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g43g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
Terry

I'm confused.

In JET, I have used

[some select string]. AS name

to effect subqueries in SQL strings

for a long time. (I didn't invent this by any means, but I may have
championed it).

I believe that in T-SQL we can just use

(some select string) AS name

OP states that the query with []. AS name does work in Access.

So, can I assume that there is something in OP's post which indicated
he's not sending this query string to JET in his .NET application
(maybe it's just that: ".NET"?), or does .NET send ANSI SQL to JET and
[]. As name isn't allowed there or what?

I'm confused.

Oh, I already said that.

OK, I'm very confused!

Nov 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
This works in Access 2003. (Works does not necessarily mean that it
does anything useful; it filters out matching records whose date in
Trans2 is before Jun 1, 2002 and could very well be effected in some
other way; but that's irrelevant to our question here.)

SELECT T.*,SubQuery.fldTransactionID
FROM Transactions T
LEFT JOIN
[SELECT fldTransactionID FROM Trans2 WHERE fldDate>=#6/1/2002#].
SubQuery
ON T.fldTransactionID = SubQuery.fldTransactionID
WHERE SubQuery.fldTransactionID IS NULL

My recollection is that the --- [sql string]. Alias --- was discovered
by someone while examining sql strings the query wizard/interface wrote
in response to some of his specifications; that person posted it to
CDMA, and gradually it became semi-popular.

This also works in Access 2003.
SELECT T.*,SubQuery.fldTransactionID
FROM Transactions T
LEFT JOIN
(SELECT fldTransactionID FROM Trans2 WHERE fldDate>=#6/1/2002#)
SubQuery
ON T.fldTransactionID = SubQuery.fldTransactionID
WHERE SubQuery.fldTransactionID IS NULL

My recollection is that it (the second sql string) did not work in JET
3.5, but I have no way of confirming that right now.

Reviewing this has given me a guess as to OPs problem. TTBOMK the
delimiters (square brackets or lower case tildes) for subqueries cannot
be nested.

Nov 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
TTBOMK Square Bracket Delimiters of/for in line SubQueries cannot be
nested. You state that it used to work; I wonder if the syntax was
exactly the same when it did.

Nov 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:OZ********************@karoo.co.uk:
Well I can see a couple of errors in there

If you lay out SQL statements and use Aliases it becomes much
easier to read them and debug them so just laying out your SQL
statement we get

SELECT
tblEncounters.EncounterBeginDT,
Query11.RID,
Query11.LName,
Query11.FName,
Query11.MI
FROM
tblEncounters
INNER JOIN
(
SELECT
tblCases.RID,
tblCases.LName,
tblCases.FName,
tblCases.MI,
tblCases.TotalNum
FROM
tblCases
INNER JOIN
[
SELECT
[tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName],
[tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status],
Count([Status]) AS TotComplete
FROM
tblRecipients
INNER JOIN
tblEncounters
ON
[tblRecipients].[RID]=[tblEncounters].[RID]
WHERE
((([tblEncounters].[Status])=1))
GROUP BY
[tblRecipients].[RID],
[tblRecipients].[LName],
[tblRecipients].[FName],
[tblRecipients].[MI],
[tblEncounters].[Status]
]. AS Query8
ON
(tblCases.TotalNum = Query8.TotComplete)
AND
(tblCases.RID = Query8.RID)
) As Query11
ON
tblEncounters.RID = Query11.RID;

We can then see that
just after the second INNER JOIN line you've enclosed the
SELECT
statement in [ ] instead of ( )
just after the closing ] (just before AS Query8) you have a
spurious '.'
(full stop or period)


That's valid Jet SQL for a "virtual table":

SELECT ...
FROM [SQL String]. As Alais

is completely valid.

However, for it to work, you have to make sure there are no
brackets
inside your SQL, and

While you accomplish the same thing with "() As" or "'' As" in
other
SQL dialects, Jet SQL is different.

I do on a daily basis exactly what you're saying is wrong.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:5L********************@karoo.co.uk:
The SQL I worked on was the one the OP had compounded to get rid
of the original query, I don't believe this is the one they stated
was working in Access I think the OP was referring to the first
statements with respect to this. In summary they aren't saying
the SQL worked in Access and therefore aren't saying the []
delimiter worked.

[] used to delimit a sub-query; I've not seen this before so I
tested it, I can't get it to work without error in either Access
as a query or ADO, in both cases an error is returned i.e.
"The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table
or query
'SELECT * FROM YourTable'.
Make sure it exists and that its name is spelled correctly."

BTW 'SELECT * FROM YourTable' is the subquery text held in t [].


It doesn't work because you're leaving out part of the syntax, which
was correct in the OP's SQL:

SELECT ...
FROM [SQL]. As Alias

The period is required, and it must be right next to the closing
bracket.

This is standard Jet SQL and has been for a very long time.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
lylefair <ly***********@aim.com> wrote:
My recollection is that the --- [sql string]. Alias --- was
discovered by someone while examining sql strings the query
wizard/interface wrote in response to some of his specifications;
that person posted it to CDMA, and gradually it became semi-popular.


IRCC it was the way A2k "refomatted" some Querydef.SQL.

select * from (select * from t)

became

select * from [select * from t]. as [%$##@_Alias]

Supprisingly that funny syntax appeared to run in A97.

--
Paul
Nov 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
Ah right, you need some "whitespace" between the ]. and the alias.

You are quite right this does work.

That is horrible syntax though (IMO).

--
Terry Kreft

"lylefair" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com...
This works in Access 2003. (Works does not necessarily mean that it
does anything useful; it filters out matching records whose date in
Trans2 is before Jun 1, 2002 and could very well be effected in some
other way; but that's irrelevant to our question here.)

SELECT T.*,SubQuery.fldTransactionID
FROM Transactions T
LEFT JOIN
[SELECT fldTransactionID FROM Trans2 WHERE fldDate>=#6/1/2002#].
SubQuery
ON T.fldTransactionID = SubQuery.fldTransactionID
WHERE SubQuery.fldTransactionID IS NULL

My recollection is that the --- [sql string]. Alias --- was discovered
by someone while examining sql strings the query wizard/interface wrote
in response to some of his specifications; that person posted it to
CDMA, and gradually it became semi-popular.

This also works in Access 2003.
SELECT T.*,SubQuery.fldTransactionID
FROM Transactions T
LEFT JOIN
(SELECT fldTransactionID FROM Trans2 WHERE fldDate>=#6/1/2002#)
SubQuery
ON T.fldTransactionID = SubQuery.fldTransactionID
WHERE SubQuery.fldTransactionID IS NULL

My recollection is that it (the second sql string) did not work in JET
3.5, but I have no way of confirming that right now.

Reviewing this has given me a guess as to OPs problem. TTBOMK the
delimiters (square brackets or lower case tildes) for subqueries cannot
be nested.

Nov 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Yes, Lyles explained it to me and it does work (although the OPs version
didn't) but Lyle's explained why he believes that to be so.

It's horrible syntax (IMO) and the fact that it doesn't work when embedded,
definitely makes it a poor choice.
--
Terry Kreft

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@216.196. 97.142...
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:5L********************@karoo.co.uk:
The SQL I worked on was the one the OP had compounded to get rid
of the original query, I don't believe this is the one they stated
was working in Access I think the OP was referring to the first
statements with respect to this. In summary they aren't saying
the SQL worked in Access and therefore aren't saying the []
delimiter worked.

[] used to delimit a sub-query; I've not seen this before so I
tested it, I can't get it to work without error in either Access
as a query or ADO, in both cases an error is returned i.e.
"The Microsoft Jet database engine cannot find the input table
or query
'SELECT * FROM YourTable'.
Make sure it exists and that its name is spelled correctly."

BTW 'SELECT * FROM YourTable' is the subquery text held in t [].


It doesn't work because you're leaving out part of the syntax, which
was correct in the OP's SQL:

SELECT ...
FROM [SQL]. As Alias

The period is required, and it must be right next to the closing
bracket.

This is standard Jet SQL and has been for a very long time.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
Yes, but in some versions of JET the horrible way was the only way to
approximate using a saved query in line.
Or it was the only way I knew! :-)

Nov 20 '05 #12

P: n/a
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:Gm********************@karoo.co.uk:
It's horrible syntax (IMO) and the fact that it doesn't work when
embedded, definitely makes it a poor choice.


What do you mean it "doesn't work when embeded"?

It does work, perfectly well, as long as you remove all square
bracket from inside the subquery.

I use it *all the time*.

It's just a different dialect of functionality provided in every
major SQL dialect. All the other choices (parentheses or back single
quotes) also have their incompatibilities, since all the options
have meaning somewhere in each of the SQL dialects involved.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 20 '05 #13

P: n/a
"kaniest" <ka*****@xs4all.nl> wrote in
news:43***********************@news.xs4all.nl:
lylefair <ly***********@aim.com> wrote:
My recollection is that the --- [sql string]. Alias --- was
discovered by someone while examining sql strings the query
wizard/interface wrote in response to some of his specifications;
that person posted it to CDMA, and gradually it became
semi-popular.


IRCC it was the way A2k "refomatted" some Querydef.SQL.

select * from (select * from t)

became

select * from [select * from t]. as [%$##@_Alias]

Supprisingly that funny syntax appeared to run in A97.


The filter by form wizard writes that kind of SQL.

But I'm pretty sure it's documented in the Jet SQL help on
subqueries.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 20 '05 #14

P: n/a
David W. Fenton wrote:
The filter by form wizard writes that kind of SQL.

But I'm pretty sure it's documented in the Jet SQL help on
subqueries.


I can't find it; perhaps you could post the section containing it
togther with a reference as to the section's location.

Nov 20 '05 #15

P: n/a
I'm merely quoting Lyle, if he's wrong then you better start arguing with
him not me, personally I woudn't touch this syntax with a barge pole unless
it was forced on me.

Remove all square brackets; your doing a better job of convincing me it's
horrible syntax.
--
Terry Kreft

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@216.196. 97.142...
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:Gm********************@karoo.co.uk:
It's horrible syntax (IMO) and the fact that it doesn't work when
embedded, definitely makes it a poor choice.


What do you mean it "doesn't work when embeded"?

It does work, perfectly well, as long as you remove all square
bracket from inside the subquery.

I use it *all the time*.

It's just a different dialect of functionality provided in every
major SQL dialect. All the other choices (parentheses or back single
quotes) also have their incompatibilities, since all the options
have meaning somewhere in each of the SQL dialects involved.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 20 '05 #16

P: n/a
Terry Kreft wrote:
I'm merely quoting Lyle, if he's wrong then you better start arguing with
him not me


Thanks A LOT, Terry! Couldn't you just have sent me a shrapnel bomb in
the post?

Nov 20 '05 #17

P: n/a
David W. Fenton <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote:
"kaniest" <ka*****@xs4all.nl> wrote in
select * from [select * from t]. as [%$##@_Alias]

Supprisingly that funny syntax appeared to run in A97.


The filter by form wizard writes that kind of SQL.


Filter by form seems to work on tables with identifiers
that need brackets. Tell us more, so we can find out how.

--
Paul
Nov 21 '05 #18

P: n/a
Oh, you haven't got that yet then ?

Sorry Lyle, I was more concerned with attribution than retribution <g>.

--
Terry Kreft

"lylefair" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Terry Kreft wrote:
I'm merely quoting Lyle, if he's wrong then you better start arguing with
him not me


Thanks A LOT, Terry! Couldn't you just have sent me a shrapnel bomb in
the post?

Nov 21 '05 #19

P: n/a
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:CZ********************@karoo.co.uk:
"lylefair" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Terry Kreft wrote:
I'm merely quoting Lyle, if he's wrong then you better start
arguing with him not me


Thanks A LOT, Terry! Couldn't you just have sent me a shrapnel
bomb in the post?


Oh, you haven't got that yet then ?

Sorry Lyle, I was more concerned with attribution than retribution
<g>.


Lyle and I are in agreement on this one. These kinds of subqueries
are quite useful.

I was doing some work with MySQL 4.0.1 today and wishing to hell
that I was able to do just that (MySQL's variant of SQL can't do
domain aggregates on non-grouped filtered recordsets).

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 23 '05 #20

P: n/a
It's nice to know it's a problem solver, as I said before though from your
and Lyle's comments I wouldn't use this syntax unless I was forced to.

--
Terry Kreft

"David W. Fenton" <dX********@bway.net.invalid> wrote in message
news:Xn**********************************@216.196. 97.142...
"Terry Kreft" <te*********@mps.co.uk> wrote in
news:CZ********************@karoo.co.uk:
"lylefair" <ly***********@aim.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
Terry Kreft wrote:
I'm merely quoting Lyle, if he's wrong then you better start
arguing with him not me

Thanks A LOT, Terry! Couldn't you just have sent me a shrapnel
bomb in the post?


Oh, you haven't got that yet then ?

Sorry Lyle, I was more concerned with attribution than retribution
<g>.


Lyle and I are in agreement on this one. These kinds of subqueries
are quite useful.

I was doing some work with MySQL 4.0.1 today and wishing to hell
that I was able to do just that (MySQL's variant of SQL can't do
domain aggregates on non-grouped filtered recordsets).

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc

Nov 23 '05 #21

P: n/a
I think that because of Access/Jet's capability of using saved queries
in other queries that it's unlikely ever to be necessary.
One of the things I've found it helpful for is explaining things here;
by using it we can show a query string, more or less, in its entirety,
without the sort of black box placeholder of a (sub) query name. I know
we can show the SQL of these sub queries in an additional paragraph,
but when we read these we may have to go back and forth between the two
entries a lot before we understand them.
Regardless its time has passed and has been for a few years if I am
right in thinking that JET 4.0 enabled the use of round brackets for
sub query strings. And I would classify this as a good thing as it
brings the syntax into line with other SQL standards.

Nov 23 '05 #22

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.