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finalizing ideas

P: n/a
hello. i want to first say that i welcome anyone's ideas for this post.
please feel free to throw your 2 cents in.

i have a db that i'm finishing that i'm going to be giving to others to use.
the ONLY thing they're going to need to manipulate in this db are 3 forms and
1 simple table (1 field which is a list of names). what is the best way to
secure or lock these items, as well as the other 6 or so tables, queries and
reports that i don't want them to open, change or delete. also, what
'finishing' changes should be made to polish the forms for presentation?
this can be for the items or access as a whole.

i don't know if you need to know this but there is some vba that opens and
closes various forms and reports when they're using any of the 3 forms. i,
of course, still need this to happen.

i'm looking for suggestions ranging from adjusting the whole item (query,
form, whatever) to adjusting properties on an object in the item that need to
be set. just please keep in mind that i'm not proficient with access as a
whole or vba almost at all so please be very specific in your answers.

think of this as a 'best practices' post so i really do welcome any
suggestion, no matter how small it seems.

Thank you very much in advance for your advice.

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200511/1
Nov 16 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
It's generally best to design a database with a "switchboard" form which
takes users to the places you want them to go, which should always be forms
and reports, never raw tables.
Then you can use Tools - Startup to hide the database window.

That should be enough to keep well-intentioned users on the right track. If
you have users who are mischievious or worse, you may need to take further
measures.

HTH
"ka******@comcast.net via AccessMonster.com" <u15580@uwe> wrote in message
news:5773d8fe46190@uwe...
hello. i want to first say that i welcome anyone's ideas for this post.
please feel free to throw your 2 cents in.

i have a db that i'm finishing that i'm going to be giving to others to use. the ONLY thing they're going to need to manipulate in this db are 3 forms and 1 simple table (1 field which is a list of names). what is the best way to secure or lock these items, as well as the other 6 or so tables, queries and reports that i don't want them to open, change or delete. also, what
'finishing' changes should be made to polish the forms for presentation?
this can be for the items or access as a whole.

i don't know if you need to know this but there is some vba that opens and
closes various forms and reports when they're using any of the 3 forms. i, of course, still need this to happen.

i'm looking for suggestions ranging from adjusting the whole item (query,
form, whatever) to adjusting properties on an object in the item that need to be set. just please keep in mind that i'm not proficient with access as a
whole or vba almost at all so please be very specific in your answers.

think of this as a 'best practices' post so i really do welcome any
suggestion, no matter how small it seems.

Thank you very much in advance for your advice.

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200511/1

Nov 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
In addition, consider making the database an MDE. In this format the
forms, modules, reports, etc., can't be changed, even by you. If you
anticipate needing to change forms in the future you will probably want
to save a copy of the mdb and import the tables from the MDE when
needing to make changes.

Marc

MacDermott wrote:
It's generally best to design a database with a "switchboard" form which
takes users to the places you want them to go, which should always be forms
and reports, never raw tables.
Then you can use Tools - Startup to hide the database window.

That should be enough to keep well-intentioned users on the right track. If
you have users who are mischievious or worse, you may need to take further
measures.

HTH
"ka******@comcast.net via AccessMonster.com" <u15580@uwe> wrote in message
news:5773d8fe46190@uwe...
hello. i want to first say that i welcome anyone's ideas for this post.
please feel free to throw your 2 cents in.

i have a db that i'm finishing that i'm going to be giving to others to


use.
the ONLY thing they're going to need to manipulate in this db are 3 forms


and
1 simple table (1 field which is a list of names). what is the best way


to
secure or lock these items, as well as the other 6 or so tables, queries


and
reports that i don't want them to open, change or delete. also, what
'finishing' changes should be made to polish the forms for presentation?
this can be for the items or access as a whole.

i don't know if you need to know this but there is some vba that opens and
closes various forms and reports when they're using any of the 3 forms.


i,
of course, still need this to happen.

i'm looking for suggestions ranging from adjusting the whole item (query,
form, whatever) to adjusting properties on an object in the item that need


to
be set. just please keep in mind that i'm not proficient with access as a
whole or vba almost at all so please be very specific in your answers.

think of this as a 'best practices' post so i really do welcome any
suggestion, no matter how small it seems.

Thank you very much in advance for your advice.

--
Message posted via AccessMonster.com
http://www.accessmonster.com/Uwe/For...ccess/200511/1


Nov 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Marc DVer" wrote
In addition, consider making the database an MDE. In this format the
forms, modules, reports, etc., can't be changed, even by you. If you
anticipate needing to change forms in the future you will probably want to
save a copy of the mdb and import the tables from the MDE when needing to
make changes.


No, you really would not want to import tables from the MDE, you would want
to separate the application into front-end (queries, forms, reports, macros,
modules, and perhaps a few local lookup tables) and back-end (tables,
relationships, and data) with the tables in the back-end linked from the
front-end. That way, you make changes on a development copy of the
front-end, and don't move it to the users for production until it has been
thoroughly tested.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 18 '05 #4

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