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Need Ideas For Layout Of Form

P: n/a
Tom
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within each
division he can work in multiple departments and within each department he
can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on multiple projects.
All the work areas of each sales associates needs to be input in the form
and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions, Departments, Groups and
Projects.There are one-to-many relationships between company and division,
division and dpartment, department and group and group and project.

Thanks for all help,

Tom
Nov 13 '05 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting the
data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind of
entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a department
would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division and so forth up
the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as primary
key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of this
client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would be the
ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept, div,
....)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever that
is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3 combos
and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what you need,
but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within each
division he can work in multiple departments and within each department he
can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on multiple
projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to be input in
the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions, Departments,
Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships between company
and division, division and dpartment, department and group and group and
project.

Thanks for all help,

Tom

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting the
data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind of
entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a department
would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division and so forth up
the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as primary
key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of this
client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would be the
ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept, div,
....)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever that
is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3 combos
and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what you need,
but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within each
division he can work in multiple departments and within each department he
can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on multiple
projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to be input in
the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions, Departments,
Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships between company
and division, division and dpartment, department and group and group and
project.

Thanks for all help,

Tom

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Tom
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group (group)
of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division) of IT Inc.
(company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group) of
the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group) of
the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT Inc.
(company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind
of entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a department
would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division and so forth
up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would be
the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever that
is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3 combos
and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what you
need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within
each division he can work in multiple departments and within each
department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on
multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to
be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions,
Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships
between company and division, division and dpartment, department and
group and group and project.

Thanks for all help,

Tom


Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Tom
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group (group)
of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division) of IT Inc.
(company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group) of
the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group) of
the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT Inc.
(company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind
of entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a department
would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division and so forth
up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would be
the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever that
is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3 combos
and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what you
need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within
each division he can work in multiple departments and within each
department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on
multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to
be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions,
Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships
between company and division, division and dpartment, department and
group and group and project.

Thanks for all help,

Tom


Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing nonsense
combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do have
to go through and enter each division that applies to each company, and then
each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes more effort
initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with internal company
structures that may not match the standard one (e.g. small companies don't
have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships between
them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group (group)
of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group)
of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind
of entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a
department would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division
and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would
be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever
that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what
you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within
each division he can work in multiple departments and within each
department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on
multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to
be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions,
Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships
between company and division, division and dpartment, department and
group and group and project.

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing nonsense
combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do have
to go through and enter each division that applies to each company, and then
each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes more effort
initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with internal company
structures that may not match the standard one (e.g. small companies don't
have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships between
them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group (group)
of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group)
of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are actually
layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a different kind
of entity. A project might be shared amongst different departments or
divisions, and could have a starting and ending date, whereas a
department would be a (normally) permanent section of just one division
and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would
be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever
that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what
you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for multiple
companies and work for multiple divisions within each company. Within
each division he can work in multiple departments and within each
department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he works on
multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates needs to
be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies, Divisions,
Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many relationships
between company and division, division and dpartment, department and
group and group and project.

Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
Tom
I have the standard table structure and now I'm looking for ideas for a
user-friendly form.

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing nonsense
combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do have
to go through and enter each division that applies to each company, and
then each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes more
effort initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with internal
company structures that may not match the standard one (e.g. small
companies don't have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships
between them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group
(group) of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division)
of IT Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group)
of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are
actually layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a
different kind of entity. A project might be shared amongst different
departments or divisions, and could have a starting and ending date,
whereas a department would be a (normally) permanent section of just one
division and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would
be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever
that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what
you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for
multiple companies and work for multiple divisions within each company.
Within each division he can work in multiple departments and within
each department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he
works on multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates
needs to be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies,
Divisions, Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many
relationships between company and division, division and dpartment,
department and group and group and project.


Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
Tom
I have the standard table structure and now I'm looking for ideas for a
user-friendly form.

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing nonsense
combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do have
to go through and enter each division that applies to each company, and
then each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes more
effort initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with internal
company structures that may not match the standard one (e.g. small
companies don't have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships
between them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group
(group) of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division)
of IT Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group (group)
of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division (division) of IT
Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are
actually layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a
different kind of entity. A project might be shared amongst different
departments or divisions, and could have a starting and ending date,
whereas a department would be a (normally) permanent section of just one
division and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent of
this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID would
be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe Smith
(staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49 (whatever
that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly what
you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form for
data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for
multiple companies and work for multiple divisions within each company.
Within each division he can work in multiple departments and within
each department he can work with multiple groups. In each group he
works on multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales associates
needs to be input in the form and displayed in the form - Companies,
Divisions, Departments, Groups and Projects.There are one-to-many
relationships between company and division, division and dpartment,
department and group and group and project.


Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
The usual form would be a bunch of combos--one each for GroupID, the
DepartmentID, etc--and a text box to enter the date.

Each combo have a lookup table as the RowSource.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:%L**************@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink .net...
I have the standard table structure and now I'm looking for ideas for a
user-friendly form.

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing
nonsense combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do
have to go through and enter each division that applies to each company,
and then each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes
more effort initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with
internal company structures that may not match the standard one (e.g.
small companies don't have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships
between them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group
(group) of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division)
of IT Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group
(group) of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are
actually layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a
different kind of entity. A project might be shared amongst different
departments or divisions, and could have a starting and ending date,
whereas a department would be a (normally) permanent section of just
one division and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent
of this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID
would be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe
Smith (staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49
(whatever that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly
what you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful
direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
>I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form
>for data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
> There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for
> multiple companies and work for multiple divisions within each
> company. Within each division he can work in multiple departments and
> within each department he can work with multiple groups. In each group
> he works on multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales
> associates needs to be input in the form and displayed in the form -
> Companies, Divisions, Departments, Groups and Projects.There are
> one-to-many relationships between company and division, division and
> dpartment, department and group and group and project.



Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a
The usual form would be a bunch of combos--one each for GroupID, the
DepartmentID, etc--and a text box to enter the date.

Each combo have a lookup table as the RowSource.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:%L**************@newsread2.news.atl.earthlink .net...
I have the standard table structure and now I'm looking for ideas for a
user-friendly form.

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
So, you have a couple of choices.

Standard structure
==============
Create:
- a table of possible Group values (records for "Industrial", etc);
- another table to hold the Department values (records for "IT", etc.)
- another table for Division values.
- another table for Companies.
- the main table that will have fields:
o GroupID
o DepartmentID
o DivisionID
o CompanyID
o StaffID
o WorkDate

The disadvantage of that approach is that you can end up choosing
nonsense combinations, such as the Welfare department of a Law form. :-)

Alternative structure
==============
The other structre suggested earlier has the disadvantage that you do
have to go through and enter each division that applies to each company,
and then each deparment of each division, and so on. While this takes
more effort initially, it may provide better data, and it copes with
internal company structures that may not match the standard one (e.g.
small companies don't have departments of divisions.)

Either way, once you have the tables in place, and the relationships
between them, you can start to think about how to create forms.

--
Allen Browne - Microsoft MVP. Perth, Western Australia.
Tips for Access users - http://allenbrowne.com/tips.html
Reply to group, rather than allenbrowne at mvps dot org.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:5T****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
Allen,

Thanks for the response!

I need records to say:
On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Industrial Group
(group) of the IT Department (department) of the ABC Division (division)
of IT Inc. (company) on project 49 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Refining Group (group)
of the Engineering Department (department) of the Construction Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 27 (project).

On August 1 (work date), Joe Smith worked for the Marketing Group
(group) of the Sales Department (department) of the XYZ Division
(division) of IT Inc. (company) on project 84 (project).

I need a form to enter these records for Joe Smith for August 1.

Thanks,

Tom
"Allen Browne" <Al*********@SeeSig.Invalid> wrote in message
news:42***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Tom, the question is not so much about the form, as it is about getting
the data structure right.

To my way of thinking, companies, divisions, and departments are
actually layers of the same kind of entity, whereas projects are a
different kind of entity. A project might be shared amongst different
departments or divisions, and could have a starting and ending date,
whereas a department would be a (normally) permanent section of just
one division and so forth up the tree.

If that is so, you might consider making a "Client" table where you can
store all the first kind of entity. It will have a ClientID field as
primary key, and a ParentID field that indicates the immediate parent
of this client. So, if the "client" is a division type, its ParentID
would be the ClientID of a record that is a company.

You would then have another table for Projects, and a table for Staff.
Another table might then have fields:
ClientID: foreign key to Client.ClientID (so can be a co, dept,
div, ...)
ProjectID: foreign key to Project.ProjectID
StaffID: foreign key to Staff.StaffID
WorkDate: date the work was done.
Each record says something like this: on August 1 (work date), Joe
Smith (staff) worked for the IT Department (client) on project 49
(whatever that is.)

If that copes with what you need, you would then have a form with 3
combos and a text box for the date. Chances are, that's not exactly
what you need, but hopefully it gets you thinking in a useful
direction.

"Tom" <no***@email.com> wrote in message
news:rY****************@newsread1.news.atl.earthli nk.net...
>I am looking for some ideas for how to design the layout of the form
>for data entry and to display the data for the following situation:
> There are many sales associates. A sales associate can work for
> multiple companies and work for multiple divisions within each
> company. Within each division he can work in multiple departments and
> within each department he can work with multiple groups. In each group
> he works on multiple projects. All the work areas of each sales
> associates needs to be input in the form and displayed in the form -
> Companies, Divisions, Departments, Groups and Projects.There are
> one-to-many relationships between company and division, division and
> dpartment, department and group and group and project.



Nov 13 '05 #11

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.