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Access backup software

P: n/a

We have a database that is in use 24/7, and does not get backed up by our
network backup software because it is always open. Does anyone have
experience with backup software specifically designed for Access which claims
to back up open Access databases? (One example is something called Access
Database Autopilot.) The pessimist in me tends to distrust such things.

We currently are asking the end user in charge of this db to kick everyone
out of the db every evening, turn off an automated process which also hits
the db, then manually make a copy of the db.
Nov 13 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
the safest is to move your backend to SQL server / MSDE which has the
capability to do this type of backup to a disk file which you can then
store offsite, or burn on CD or ...

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Baz
"Sue W via AccessMonster.com" <fo***@AccessMonster.com> wrote in message
news:51***********@AccessMonster.com...

We have a database that is in use 24/7, and does not get backed up by our
network backup software because it is always open. Does anyone have
experience with backup software specifically designed for Access which claims to back up open Access databases? (One example is something called Access
Database Autopilot.) The pessimist in me tends to distrust such things.

We currently are asking the end user in charge of this db to kick everyone
out of the db every evening, turn off an automated process which also hits
the db, then manually make a copy of the db.


You can schedule a job using the Windows scheduler which copies the database
before the backup (just a simple file copy). The copy will not be open, and
hence will be backed up.

Some people will tell you there is a risk that if you copy an open database
then the copy could be corrupt. Doubtless they are theoretically correct,
but I have loads of experience with automatically backing up open databases
in this way, and I have never encountered a corrupt copy. To be on the safe
side, you could automatically make several copies, one after another. If
the chances of one copy being corrupt are small, then the chances of several
being corrupt are vanishing.
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a

Baz wrote:
Some people will tell you there is a risk that if you copy an open database
then the copy could be corrupt. Doubtless they are theoretically correct,
but I have loads of experience with automatically backing up open databases
in this way, and I have never encountered a corrupt copy. To be on the safe
side, you could automatically make several copies, one after another. If
the chances of one copy being corrupt are small, then the chances of several
being corrupt are vanishing.
Thanks, it sounds like it would be worth trying to copy the open database a
few times and seeing how consistently we get good copies!
le*********@natpro.com wrote:the safest is to move your backend to SQL server / MSDE which has the
capability to do this type of backup to a disk file which you can then
store offsite, or burn on CD or ...


Unfortunately, this is a vended software program that uses an Access backend
(still!), very much to our chagrin. Our database is 200mb and we aren't even
using half of what the program does; I can just imagine the problems other
companies with bigger db's are having using such large Access db's over a
network.
--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Baz
"Sue W via AccessMonster.com" <fo***@AccessMonster.com> wrote in message
news:52***********@AccessMonster.com...

Unfortunately, this is a vended software program that uses an Access backend (still!), very much to our chagrin. Our database is 200mb and we aren't even using half of what the program does; I can just imagine the problems other
companies with bigger db's are having using such large Access db's over a
network.
--
Message posted via http://www.accessmonster.com


200Mb is nothing, it's well within the capabilities of Access (assuming, of
course, that the design is good!). I would never advise upsizing to SQL
Server simply because a database had reached a mere 200Mb (although there
may be other compelling reasons).
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Many backup programs offer an "open file option" that takes a snapshot of
the files before doing the backup. If you are running WinXP or Windows 2003
Server, then Shadow Copy may be able to do this for you. You may want to ask
the Windows folks in the appropriate newsgroup for your version of Windows.

--
Wayne Morgan
MS Access MVP
"Sue W via AccessMonster.com" <fo***@AccessMonster.com> wrote in message
news:51***********@AccessMonster.com...

We have a database that is in use 24/7, and does not get backed up by our
network backup software because it is always open. Does anyone have
experience with backup software specifically designed for Access which
claims
to back up open Access databases? (One example is something called Access
Database Autopilot.) The pessimist in me tends to distrust such things.

We currently are asking the end user in charge of this db to kick everyone
out of the db every evening, turn off an automated process which also hits
the db, then manually make a copy of the db.

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
I have a similar problem with my customer db. I also COPY the open db to a
Temp location/name, compact the temp file (this should show any corruption
that may occurr) and then copy the compacted temp file to a final
destination. So far (~6mo) no corruption issues or problems. I've gone so
far as to to the backup automatically in the background and the operators
don't even have to stop any processes. I only inform them if there is an
error.

I'm using the File Copy routine from the Access Web written by Dev Ashish.
"Sue W via AccessMonster.com" <fo***@AccessMonster.com> wrote in message
news:51***********@AccessMonster.com...

We have a database that is in use 24/7, and does not get backed up by our
network backup software because it is always open. Does anyone have
experience with backup software specifically designed for Access which
claims
to back up open Access databases? (One example is something called Access
Database Autopilot.) The pessimist in me tends to distrust such things.

We currently are asking the end user in charge of this db to kick everyone
out of the db every evening, turn off an automated process which also hits
the db, then manually make a copy of the db.

Nov 13 '05 #7

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