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WTF?? No save of modules?

P: n/a
Well, I suppose it was only 20 minutes work, but it would have been nice if
I'd been prompted to save that new code module. After all, they ask you if
you want to save new forms, reports etc.
Nov 13 '05 #1
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13 Replies


P: n/a
Oh I see, you can close the code window. It's only when you come to actually
'Save' the project that you get the prompt. How strange.

"Mike MacSween" <mi***************************@btinternet.com> wrote in
message news:42***********************@news.aaisp.net.uk.. .
Well, I suppose it was only 20 minutes work, but it would have been nice
if I'd been prompted to save that new code module. After all, they ask you
if you want to save new forms, reports etc.

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
That's been the case since Access 2000 when they shared the Visual Basic
Environment (VBE) that the rest of Office used. Many prefer the older VBE
used by earlier versions of Access. Another instance of an "improved user
experience", I suppose. And, when you save, it saves everything, not just
the particular object on which you are working, aka the "monolithic save".

A consequence of this change is that if you are testing something, like API
calls, that crashes Access, you are likely to lose whatever VBA code you
have added or changed.

I speak from experience on this: it did not take a great many crashes to
"condition" me to manually save my code, without a prompt.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
"Mike MacSween" <mi***************************@btinternet.com> wrote in
message news:42***********************@news.aaisp.net.uk.. .
Oh I see, you can close the code window. It's only when you come to actually 'Save' the project that you get the prompt. How strange.

"Mike MacSween" <mi***************************@btinternet.com> wrote in
message news:42***********************@news.aaisp.net.uk.. .
Well, I suppose it was only 20 minutes work, but it would have been nice
if I'd been prompted to save that new code module. After all, they ask you if you want to save new forms, reports etc.


Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:brCwe.6639$Iv6.4971@trnddc03:
I speak from experience on this: it did not take a great many
crashes to "condition" me to manually save my code, without a
prompt.


I compile and save after almost every line of code.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
David W. Fenton wrote:
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:brCwe.6639$Iv6.4971@trnddc03:

I speak from experience on this: it did not take a great many
crashes to "condition" me to manually save my code, without a
prompt.

I compile and save after almost every line of code.


That's drastic.

--
[OO=00=OO]
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Trevor Best <no****@besty.org.uk> wrote in
news:42***********************@news.zen.co.uk:
David W. Fenton wrote:
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:brCwe.6639$Iv6.4971@trnddc03:
I speak from experience on this: it did not take a great many
crashes to "condition" me to manually save my code, without a
prompt.


I compile and save after almost every line of code.


That's drastic.


Experience has taught me to do so.

I exaggerate a bit, though.

It's more like "compile and save after every block of code,"
meaning, if I code a new subroutine, I compile and save before
testing it.

And I never leave the code window without compiling and saving,
unless I know that what I've typed so far is uncompilable or not
appropriate for saving.

I despise the Win2K+ VBE setup. For me, it's an extremely unfriendly
coding environment, and I've still not figured out why code always
seems to be running no matter what state I think the code is in.

This leads me to see it as a fundamentally flawed implementation.

And I have lots more problems with it than I do in A97. Just the
other day I was making changes to a class module while testing it,
and the changes just weren't flowing through as they should, even
when I destroyed and re-instantiated the instance I was using.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Trevor Best" <no****@besty.org.uk> wrote
I compile and save after almost
every line of code.
That's drastic.


Obviously, David's "tender years in the programming business" were not
spent, as were mine, in shops where lines of code were entered via a
keypunch and the punched card placed in the proper position in a deck or
tray of other cards, which deck or tray was then submitted to be run "in due
course of time" (usually no less than an hour later),

OR,

he's far better than I at breaking old habits. <GRIN>

I suspect the latter is true, whether or not the first is. <BG>

I put in a few hours over the years sitting at an IBM 026, 029, or their
more modern successors (what an advance: you punched in all the columns, and
could view and correct them before committing to punching the card). For the
younglings among us, those are all keypunch machines. And I always resented
the folks who laid out computer rooms with the local keypunch at the
farthest point from the card reader and operator console.

I generally type in all the lines I am going to change in one procedure and
then compile.

Larry
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
David W. Fenton wrote:

It's more like "compile and save after every block of code,"
meaning, if I code a new subroutine, I compile and save before
testing it.


That's a method I've used for years, even b4 Access. Mind you, some
languages you had no choice, e.g. in C you had to save and compile to
test it as there was no interpreter.
--
[OO=00=OO]
Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
Larry Linson wrote:
And I always resented
the folks who laid out computer rooms with the local keypunch at the
farthest point from the card reader and operator console.


That's because they wanted to trip you up along the way :-)

--
[OO=00=OO]
Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
Early form of RSI prevention?

Trevor Best wrote:
Larry Linson wrote:
And I always resented
the folks who laid out computer rooms with the local keypunch at the
farthest point from the card reader and operator console.

That's because they wanted to trip you up along the way :-)


--
Bas Cost Budde, Holland
http://www.heuveltop.nl/BasCB/msac_index.html
For human replies, replace the queue with a tea

Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a
Larry Linson wrote:
"Trevor Best" <no****@besty.org.uk> wrote
> > I compile and save after almost
> > every line of code.

> That's drastic.


Obviously, David's "tender years in the programming business" were not
spent, as were mine, in shops where lines of code were entered via a
keypunch and the punched card placed in the proper position in a deck or
tray of other cards, which deck or tray was then submitted to be run "in due
course of time" (usually no less than an hour later),

OR,

he's far better than I at breaking old habits. <GRIN>

I suspect the latter is true, whether or not the first is. <BG>


The latter translates as:

He's much younger than I am because he's able to learn new tricks,
which an old dog like me can't do :-).

Let me respond Trevor style:

Some people have a real tough time adapting.

Rough Translation:

You're older than dirt :-).

I try not to discount the advice derived from that many years of
experience easily. BTW, I compile between the two but closer to your
frequency. When I really feel confident that everything is staying
compilable I use your frequency.

Respectfully,

James A. Fortune

Nov 13 '05 #11

P: n/a
Trevor Best <no****@besty.org.uk> wrote in
news:42***********************@news.zen.co.uk:
David W. Fenton wrote:

It's more like "compile and save after every block of code,"
meaning, if I code a new subroutine, I compile and save before
testing it.


That's a method I've used for years, even b4 Access. Mind you,
some languages you had no choice, e.g. in C you had to save and
compile to test it as there was no interpreter.


Well, I don't mean to suggest that I'm not compulsive about it. I
compile/save almost as often as I breathe. Experience has taught me
I have to, or risk losing edits.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #12

P: n/a

<ji********@compumarc.com> wrote
Rough Translation:

You're older than dirt :-).


I announced that to my user group Access SIG on my sixtieth birthday.
Translation: I am now several years older'n dirt.

In fact, on vacation in Arizona's Red Rock country, I bought a T-shirt
saying "Older'n Dirt" -- all the dyeing was done with their local red dirt.

Have a good day, sonny...

Larry
Nov 13 '05 #13

P: n/a
Larry Linson wrote:
<ji********@compumarc.com> wrote
> Rough Translation:
>
> You're older than dirt :-).
>


I announced that to my user group Access SIG on my sixtieth birthday.
Translation: I am now several years older'n dirt.

In fact, on vacation in Arizona's Red Rock country, I bought a T-shirt
saying "Older'n Dirt" -- all the dyeing was done with their local red dirt.

Have a good day, sonny...


You're only as young as the woman you feel.

--
[OO=00=OO]
Nov 13 '05 #14

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