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Use friendly Databse Tool for non-DBAs

P: n/a
Hello,

I was looking for databse tools that allow easy access to data for
users with minimal or no DB knowledge to perform meainstream functions
such as read/write/edit/delete data. Something like an editor perhaps,
that will also have user previledges before he/she starts accessing
databases.

Are there any off-the shelf products available that support MS Access?

Thanks.

Sid

Nov 13 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
So what is it you're looking for that Access itself doesn't provide?
<si******@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegro ups.com...
Hello,

I was looking for databse tools that allow easy access to data for
users with minimal or no DB knowledge to perform meainstream functions
such as read/write/edit/delete data. Something like an editor perhaps,
that will also have user previledges before he/she starts accessing
databases.

Are there any off-the shelf products available that support MS Access?

Thanks.

Sid

Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
si******@gmail.com wrote:
Hello,

I was looking for databse tools that allow easy access to data for
users with minimal or no DB knowledge to perform meainstream functions
such as read/write/edit/delete data. Something like an editor perhaps,
that will also have user previledges before he/she starts accessing
databases.

Are there any off-the shelf products available that support MS Access?

Thanks.

Sid

You might want to look at FileMaker Pro at http://www.filemaker.com/ or
Alpha5. There are some DB products that do much of the stuff for you.

I would think that you should be able to link to access databases with
these products but I can't say for certain.

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Salad" wrote
You might want to look at FileMaker
Pro at http://www.filemaker.com/ or
Alpha5. There are some DB products
that do much of the stuff for you.

I would think that you should be able
to link to access databases with
these products but I can't say for certain.


These, and Lotus Approach, often get good marks for usability by end users
(esp. the most recent FileMaker), but so does Access itself. None of them,
IMNSHO, provide a better way than Access itself for accessing Access/Jet
databases.

My suggestion is to get Access, and the Microsoft Press book, _Microsoft
Access Step by Step_, and use Access for Access.
Depending on the versions of products compared, Access has often been rated
"easiest to use" in comparative test articles.

But the summation often is that all of the products mentioned herein are
sufficiently easy to use that you "won't go wrong no matter which you pick".

It is when you get a bit beyond the novice-user stage that Access' excellent
connectivity features, and its development capabilities really shine, making
it the clear choice over the whole range of functionality.

In fact, if you have one competent developer, that person may be able, very
simply and at low investment of time and effort, to create an application to
do what you need the novices to do that is so straightforward and intuitive
that they don't even need to realize they are working with "a database".

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
Larry Linson wrote:
"Salad" wrote
> You might want to look at FileMaker
> Pro at http://www.filemaker.com/ or
> Alpha5. There are some DB products
> that do much of the stuff for you.
>
> I would think that you should be able
> to link to access databases with
> these products but I can't say for certain.


These, and Lotus Approach, often get good marks for usability by end users
(esp. the most recent FileMaker), but so does Access itself. None of them,
IMNSHO, provide a better way than Access itself for accessing Access/Jet
databases.

My suggestion is to get Access, and the Microsoft Press book, _Microsoft
Access Step by Step_, and use Access for Access.
Depending on the versions of products compared, Access has often been rated
"easiest to use" in comparative test articles.


I also think the "Visual" books, for a newbie, are very good. THe
Step-by-step is more "developer" oriented.

Nov 13 '05 #5

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