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say what???

P: n/a
>From Microsoft Office 2000/Visual Basic Programmer's Guide

Choosing ADO or DAO for Working with Access Databases
-------------------------------------------------------------------

"When you use the Recordset property to set the Recordset object of a
Form object to a Recordset object you created, if you set the Form
object to an ADO Recordset object, the data will be read-only. If you
want the data to be writable, you must set the Form object to a DAO
Recordset object."

Can anybody translate this into english please?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...sdatabases.asp

Nov 13 '05 #1
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"timster" <ti********@sd-partners.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
From Microsoft Office 2000/Visual Basic Programmer's Guide


Choosing ADO or DAO for Working with Access Databases
-------------------------------------------------------------------

"When you use the Recordset property to set the Recordset object of a
Form object to a Recordset object you created, if you set the Form
object to an ADO Recordset object, the data will be read-only. If you
want the data to be writable, you must set the Form object to a DAO
Recordset object."

Can anybody translate this into english please?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...sdatabases.asp


I would have guessed that if you don't understand it then it means you don't
need to. The only time this might affect you is if you write VBA code for
your forms and programmatically create a recordset which you assign to a
form - a technique which is probably not as common as setting the
recordsource property.
Anyway, there are two different object libraries for working with data - DAO
and ADO and both of these libraries contain a recordset object. In other
words you could create two different types of recordsets: a DAO.Recordset or
a ADO.Recordset. For a wide range of tasks, either type would do, but not
if you want it to be used as the recordset of an updateable form. In this
particular case, you have to use a DAO.Recordset since the ADO.Recordset
won't let you edit the data - a pretty serious disadvantage for ADO
recordsets.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Justin,
I finally understood it on the 5th time of reading!

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
Translation:

"When you set the Recordset property of a Form object
to a DAO Recordset you created, the data will be readonly.
If you want to modify the data, you must use an
ADO Recordset instead."

Regards,
Enrique

Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
<en***@online.no> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
Translation:

"When you set the Recordset property of a Form object
to a DAO Recordset you created, the data will be readonly.
If you want to modify the data, you must use an
ADO Recordset instead."

Regards,
Enrique


Whoa... that's not what it says.

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Justin Hoffman wrote:
"timster" <ti********@sd-partners.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
From Microsoft Office 2000/Visual Basic Programmer's Guide
Choosing ADO or DAO for Working with Access Databases
-------------------------------------------------------------------

"When you use the Recordset property to set the Recordset object of a Form object to a Recordset object you created, if you set the Form
object to an ADO Recordset object, the data will be read-only. If you want the data to be writable, you must set the Form object to a DAO
Recordset object."

Can anybody translate this into english please?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...sdatabases.asp
I would have guessed that if you don't understand it then it means you don't need to. The only time this might affect you is if you write VBA code for your forms and programmatically create a recordset which you assign to a form - a technique which is probably not as common as setting the
recordsource property.
Anyway, there are two different object libraries for working with data - DAO and ADO and both of these libraries contain a recordset object. In other words you could create two different types of recordsets: a DAO.Recordset or a ADO.Recordset. For a wide range of tasks, either type would do, but not if you want it to be used as the recordset of an updateable form. In this particular case, you have to use a DAO.Recordset since the ADO.Recordset won't let you edit the data - a pretty serious disadvantage for ADO
recordsets.

It would be except for one small thing:

It's not true.

ADO recordsets as form recordsets are editable in Access 2000. I know
this because I have done it.

And the myth that transactions cannot work with these is just that, a
myth. I know this because I have used them.

And yes, I have posted the code here in CDMA previously.

One of the first things one should learn about MS is that much of its
documentation is flawed.

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a

<ly******@yahoo.ca> wrote in message
news:11********************@g14g2000cwa.googlegrou ps.com...
Justin Hoffman wrote:
"timster" <ti********@sd-partners.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g47g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
> >From Microsoft Office 2000/Visual Basic Programmer's Guide
>
> Choosing ADO or DAO for Working with Access Databases
> -------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> "When you use the Recordset property to set the Recordset object of a > Form object to a Recordset object you created, if you set the Form
> object to an ADO Recordset object, the data will be read-only. If you > want the data to be writable, you must set the Form object to a DAO
> Recordset object."
>
> Can anybody translate this into english please?
>
>

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...sdatabases.asp

I would have guessed that if you don't understand it then it means

you don't
need to. The only time this might affect you is if you write VBA

code for
your forms and programmatically create a recordset which you assign

to a
form - a technique which is probably not as common as setting the
recordsource property.
Anyway, there are two different object libraries for working with

data - DAO
and ADO and both of these libraries contain a recordset object. In

other
words you could create two different types of recordsets: a

DAO.Recordset or
a ADO.Recordset. For a wide range of tasks, either type would do,

but not
if you want it to be used as the recordset of an updateable form. In

this
particular case, you have to use a DAO.Recordset since the

ADO.Recordset
won't let you edit the data - a pretty serious disadvantage for ADO
recordsets.

It would be except for one small thing:

It's not true.

ADO recordsets as form recordsets are editable in Access 2000. I know
this because I have done it.

And the myth that transactions cannot work with these is just that, a
myth. I know this because I have used them.

And yes, I have posted the code here in CDMA previously.

One of the first things one should learn about MS is that much of its
documentation is flawed.


Perhaps I should be more adventurous and check out some of these
undocumented features ... firstly this one, then I'll try overclocking my
processor to 3.8GHz adding extra cooling with a combination of vacuum
cleaner and fish tank spare parts.
Nov 13 '05 #7

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