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Convert Access 2 to Access 2000

I have been tasked with converting a legacy Access 2 system to Access
2000. This in itself is not the issue.

I have a copy of the Program, Data and SYSTEM.MDA file used by the
client. However, I can not gain access to the programs as I do not have
a copy of Access 2 to an know nothing about the access security model
to be able to gain access to the system.

When I try to open the PROGRAM file I get the following message - "You
don't have the necessary permission to use the PROGRAM.mdb object". etc
etc...

Could someone shed some light on how to upgrade to Access 2000
Thank You.

Nov 13 '05 #1
3 2163

"Nigel C" <ni************@hotmail.com> schreef in bericht news:11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegr oups.com...
I have been tasked with converting a legacy Access 2 system to Access
2000. This in itself is not the issue.

I have a copy of the Program, Data and SYSTEM.MDA file used by the
client. However, I can not gain access to the programs as I do not have
a copy of Access 2 to an know nothing about the access security model
to be able to gain access to the system.

When I try to open the PROGRAM file I get the following message - "You
don't have the necessary permission to use the PROGRAM.mdb object". etc
etc...

Could someone shed some light on how to upgrade to Access 2000
Thank You.


Try a shortcut like:
PathTo MSaccess.exe PathToProgram.mdb /wrkgrp PathToSystem.mda
(Use double quotes where needed)
You will have to login with a valid login but can convert from here I guess.
Good luck

Arno R
Nov 13 '05 #2
Thanks for your response. I have tried your suggestion but I keep
getting either an "Automation Error" if converting/opening in Access 97
or "System crash" if I use Access XP.

So although this seemed promising, it did not get me to the object
window in Access.

So I am still hunting for an answer.

Nov 13 '05 #3
"Nigel C" wrote
I have been tasked with converting
a legacy Access 2 system to Access
2000. This in itself is not the issue.

I have a copy of the Program, Data
and SYSTEM.MDA file used by the
client. However, I can not gain access
to the programs as I do not have
a copy of Access 2 to an know nothing
about the access security model
to be able to gain access to the system.

When I try to open the PROGRAM file
I get the following message - "You
don't have the necessary permission to
use the PROGRAM.mdb object". etc
etc...


If security has been applied, you do need appropriate permission to log in.
Can you find out if the database is being used and if the users log in with
a userid and password? If you can log in, no matter how limited your
permissions, you can easily copy all the objects except tables and data
(which are likely in your data.mdb, anyway) to an unsecured database.
There's probably an example somewhere on the Internet, but I don't have a
link or reference to a saved newsgroup post.

Use the Command Line parameters (about which, see Help on your version of
Access) to specify the Access.EXE that you want to use to open it, the file
you want to open, and the security workgroup file you want to use (in your
case, that SYSTEM.MDA). Later in the thread, you mention Access 97 and
Access 2000 -- either should be able to open an Access 2 database and
convert it. There are a few syntax changes that may have to be handled
manually.

The biggest problem is that Access 2.0 used 16-bit API Calls, and later
versions must use 32-bit API Calls, so any API calls used must be changed.
The good news is that many Access databases don't use any API calls in their
code.

If worse comes to worst, there are "password recovery" packages that you can
find on the net that will let you into almost any (uncorrupted) Access
database -- they range from free to inexpensive. "Password recovery" is a
euphemism for "security crack". Your only worry is that sales might have
gotten so slow that everybody removed their Access 2.0 versions...

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #4

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