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access to sql

P: n/a
i'm building an aplication that in the end sopuse to run on SQL but i'm
building it on access.
do i am going to have alot of work when im going to change database?
Nov 13 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
"Sagi" <sa**@schieber.net> wrote in message
news:42******@news.bezeqint.net...
i'm building an aplication that in the end sopuse to run on SQL but i'm
building it on access.
do i am going to have alot of work when im going to change database?


Oh for heaven's sake. Develop in the DBMS you're going to use in production.
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
"Mike MacSween" wrote
Oh for heaven's sake. Develop in the
DBMS you're going to use in production.


MSDE (aka the Desktop Edition of Microsoft SQL Server) comes with Access, is
free, but supports a limited user audience and lacks the excellent, useful
administrative tools of SQL Server. However, the Developer Edition of
Microsoft SQL Server, licensed only for development use, not production, has
the nice administrative tools, and is very inexpensive. Either of these can
be run on the same machine on which you are developing the Access UI.

You can develop in Access/Jet and not have too many changes, later, provided
you are well aware of the different approaches needed for an Access client
application for a server DB. I do not recommend this unless you are very
experienced both in Access and in the server DB. But, if you are that
experienced, you will be better advised to use the Developer Edition of SQL
Server, or for other server DBs, a similar edition that will run on the same
machine as your Access client (and almost every server DB has an edition
that will... for some it is the identical server DB that you'll run on the
server in production mode).

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in message
news:Yudge.23200$hh6.13202@trnddc01...
"Mike MacSween" wrote
Oh for heaven's sake. Develop in the
DBMS you're going to use in production.


MSDE (aka the Desktop Edition of Microsoft SQL Server) comes with Access,
is
free, but supports a limited user audience and lacks the excellent, useful
administrative tools of SQL Server. However, the Developer Edition of
Microsoft SQL Server, licensed only for development use, not production,
has
the nice administrative tools, and is very inexpensive. Either of these
can
be run on the same machine on which you are developing the Access UI.


Sure. But using the MSDE isn't really 'developing in Access' is it? I meant
that if he wants the production version to be running under SQL Server (he
never actually said 'Server'!) then he shouldn't using a jet back end. The
MSDE _is_ SQL Server really, except with the limitations you rightly
mention.

Mike
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a

"Sagi" <sa**@schieber.net> wrote in message
news:42******@news.bezeqint.net...
i'm building an aplication that in the end sopuse to run on SQL but i'm
building it on access.
do i am going to have alot of work when im going to change database?


When you say 'run on SQL' do you mean the Microsoft product 'SQL Server'?
The acronym SQL stands for Structure Query Language, which is the standard
language for manipulating relational databases, and is implemented by most
vendors of database products (to a greater or lesser extent).

As Larry correctly points out, there is a slightly limited version of SQL
Server called the MSDE available with Access. It's limitations, at least in
terms of data volume and user audience, wouldn't prevent you developing
effectively in it. Though as Larry says, the extra tools, especially
Enterprise Manager, that you get with the Developers Edition of SQL Server
are very useful (do you get BOL with the MSDE, anybody know?).

There are 2 halves (or more!) to a database application. The database engine
and the client interface. In an 'Access only' system the client interface
would be developed in Access and the database engine would be Jet, which is
the database engine that comes with Access, and which Access clients work
with very well. Access sometimes appear to be one product, but you need to
understand right from the start that it is really 2 products.

In a SQL Server system SQL Server is the database engine and the client that
you use to interact with the database is up to you. Access makes a good
client to SQL Server, or an application developed in VB, or whatever you
like. Many database web sites use SQL Server as the database, and the
'client' is a web application, a set of .asp pages.

If know for certain that this thing will use SQL Server as the database
engine when it goes into production then you would well advised to develop
it in SQL Server/MSDE.

Mike
Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
When I installed MSDE off the A2K disc, MS was making available an updated
version of MSDE that had all the SQL development tools for the cost of
shipping ($10). Perhaps that's the Developer Edition you refer to.

MSDE (aka the Desktop Edition of Microsoft SQL Server) comes with Access,
is
free, but supports a limited user audience and lacks the excellent, useful
administrative tools of SQL Server. However, the Developer Edition of
Microsoft SQL Server, licensed only for development use, not production,
has
the nice administrative tools, and is very inexpensive. Either of these
can
be run on the same machine on which you are developing the Access UI.

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:sk**************@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
When I installed MSDE off the A2K disc, MS was making available an updated
version of MSDE that had all the SQL development tools for the cost of
shipping ($10). Perhaps that's the Developer Edition you refer to.


Ooo, nice. Microsoft has a wide variety of extremely good offers to try to
encourage people to develop for Windows et al. I can't really believe they
actually make money on the various MSDN subscriptions, academic version etc.
that they offer.

Mike
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
rkc
Mike MacSween wrote:>
(do you get BOL with the MSDE, anybody know?).


If not, BOL is a free download from the microftsoft site.
This url to an article about bol is shorter than the actual ms
url and will get you there.

http://www.databasejournal.com/featu...le.php/3309971
Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a

"Mike MacSween" wrote
Sure. But using the MSDE isn't really
'developing in Access' is it? I meant
that if he wants the production version
to be running under SQL Server (he
never actually said 'Server'!) then he
shouldn't using a jet back end. The
MSDE _is_ SQL Server really, except
with the limitations you rightly
mention.


I was agreeing with you that development, if possible, should use the
database engine that will be used in production, but didn't consider that
using the MSDE or SQL Server Developer was NOT "developing in Access". It is
only the database engine that is different. Most of the paying work that I
have done with Access was developing Access clients for use with server DBs.
And, since I opened Access to do my development work, and linked the server
tables via Jet with ODBC, I certainly considered that I was "developing in
Access".

I distinguish between client-server and multiuser front-and-back-end, though
there's not universal agreement on the terminology.

Access is, strictly speaking, the end-user interface and development tool,
and Jet is the database engine that is installed by default. It's clear that
Jet is going to be used by Access for some time to come, from what various
Microsoft personnel have said in the trade magazines.

I've heard rumors* that, from a management and personnel view, Jet may be
moved closer to Office and Access in the future, just because of system
architecture changes (COM vs .NET), but as far as I know it will still be a
database engine that is separable or usable for linking servers, just as it
is now.

* and my experience in years past with
corporations restructuring and transferring
functions would lead me to believe that
any such arrangement is impermanent, at
best. <G>

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
Yeah -- even the cost of SQL Server compared to Oracle is a big dip.

"Mike MacSween" <mi***************************@btinternet.com> wrote in
message news:42***********************@news.aaisp.net.uk.. .
"Neil" <no****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:sk**************@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink .net...
When I installed MSDE off the A2K disc, MS was making available an
updated version of MSDE that had all the SQL development tools for the
cost of shipping ($10). Perhaps that's the Developer Edition you refer
to.


Ooo, nice. Microsoft has a wide variety of extremely good offers to try to
encourage people to develop for Windows et al. I can't really believe they
actually make money on the various MSDN subscriptions, academic version
etc. that they offer.

Mike

Nov 13 '05 #10

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