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Issues between A97 and Outlook 2003?

P: n/a
Within the next six months, our office is going to be converting it's
e-mail server from GroupWise over to Outlook 2003 & MS Exchange. I
have been using Dimitri Furman's (google him, he's out there) GroupWise
API code for years and have been quite happy with it. However, with
the conversion, I'm forced to ditch it for Outlook.

The I.T. department is still mired in red tape over the A97->A2K3
conversion, so I know I'll still be in A97. My question is: Are
they're any known/large issues with using the ancient A97 environment
to automate Outlook 2003?

I'm sure I can delve into the object library when I get my hands on it,
but I want to be certain I wanted to make sure I don't have too ugly of
a beast to contend with.

Thanks in advance,
Anthony.

Nov 13 '05 #1
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14 Replies


P: n/a
ac*******@railvan.com wrote:
Within the next six months, our office is going to be converting it's
e-mail server from GroupWise over to Outlook 2003 & MS Exchange. I
have been using Dimitri Furman's (google him, he's out there)
GroupWise API code for years and have been quite happy with it.
However, with the conversion, I'm forced to ditch it for Outlook.

The I.T. department is still mired in red tape over the A97->A2K3
conversion, so I know I'll still be in A97. My question is: Are
they're any known/large issues with using the ancient A97 environment
to automate Outlook 2003?

I'm sure I can delve into the object library when I get my hands on
it, but I want to be certain I wanted to make sure I don't have too
ugly of a beast to contend with.

Thanks in advance,
Anthony.


The code to automate Outlook from Access 97 will be exactly the same code you
would use to automate Outlook with any other version of Access. What you will
have fun with are the security features in Outlook 2003 that will pester the
crap out of your users. Once you do finally get Access up to 2003 though that
problem will be overshadowed by the security features in Access 2003 that will
pester them just as bad if not worse.

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
I've read from Allen Browne's warning list
(http://allenbrowne.com/ser-48.html) the Access issues, but what am I
looking at with Outlook? I'm guessing it's along the same lines of
Access warnings for using VB coding and the like, but what else?

Anthony.

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
ac*******@railvan.com wrote:
I've read from Allen Browne's warning list
(http://allenbrowne.com/ser-48.html) the Access issues, but what am I
looking at with Outlook? I'm guessing it's along the same lines of
Access warnings for using VB coding and the like, but what else?

Anthony.


Every time your app tries to do anything that requires accessing the global
address book the user will get a warning along the lines of...

------------------------------------------------------------
A program is trying to access the global address book.
Do you want to allow this?

[ Yes ] [ No ]
Allow for [n]\/ Minutes
------------------------------------------------------------

In addition anytime your app tries to send an Email they will get another
message...

------------------------------------------------------------
A program is trying to send an Email on your behalf.
Do you want to allow this?
[ Yes ] [ No ]
------------------------------------------------------------

The above has a 5 second pause before you can make a choice to prevent SendKeys
from being able to automatically make the choice.

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:05:14 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

There is a well-known registry fix for that.
There also is Redemption, a cool CDO-based tool that works around the
issue altogether. I dig that Dmitri author.

-Tom.

ac*******@railvan.com wrote:
I've read from Allen Browne's warning list
(http://allenbrowne.com/ser-48.html) the Access issues, but what am I
looking at with Outlook? I'm guessing it's along the same lines of
Access warnings for using VB coding and the like, but what else?

Anthony.


Every time your app tries to do anything that requires accessing the global
address book the user will get a warning along the lines of...

------------------------------------------------------------
A program is trying to access the global address book.
Do you want to allow this?

[ Yes ] [ No ]
Allow for [n]\/ Minutes
------------------------------------------------------------

In addition anytime your app tries to send an Email they will get another
message...

------------------------------------------------------------
A program is trying to send an Email on your behalf.
Do you want to allow this?
[ Yes ] [ No ]
------------------------------------------------------------

The above has a 5 second pause before you can make a choice to prevent SendKeys
from being able to automatically make the choice.


Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:05:14 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

There is a well-known registry fix for that.
There also is Redemption, a cool CDO-based tool that works around the
issue altogether. I dig that Dmitri author.

-Tom.


There is a well-known registry fix for what? The Outlook address book prompt?
My testing with Redemption indicated that it addressed the second messge, but
not the first. If there is a registry setting that addresses te first one I
have never heard of it. Can you provide a link?

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:48:22 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

This is the registry file I use:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Secu rity]
"CheckAdminSettings"=dword:00000001
It works in conjunction with Exchange. Here is an article with more
info on that:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...t/outcust.mspx

-Tom.

Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:05:14 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

There is a well-known registry fix for that.
There also is Redemption, a cool CDO-based tool that works around the
issue altogether. I dig that Dmitri author.

-Tom.


There is a well-known registry fix for what? The Outlook address book prompt?
My testing with Redemption indicated that it addressed the second messge, but
not the first. If there is a registry setting that addresses te first one I
have never heard of it. Can you provide a link?


Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:48:22 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

This is the registry file I use:

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Secu rity]
"CheckAdminSettings"=dword:00000001

It works in conjunction with Exchange. Here is an article with more
info on that:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...t/outcust.mspx

I added that key and it did nothing. If you mean that one also has to
change the security settings on the Exchange server then that is a different
kettle of fish. I have always known that the security stuff can be relaxed
if you can get the Exchange admins to change policy settings. The point is
that the client (thus an Access app) cannot do anything about these security
prompts (other than to avoid using Outlook/simple MAPI).

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Nov 13 '05 #8

P: n/a
I wasn't looking forward to the conversion before, but now the skies
are getting darker.

Tom: Thanks for the link to the KB article. We'll have to work with
the IT department on exactly which settings will need to be reduced.
There's a caveat there regarding not doing it to a large community, and
we'll have to see exactly how many people will need it done.

If anyone else has any other suggestions, please chime in. I'd like to
know whatever we might be up against.

Thanks,
Anthony.

Nov 13 '05 #9

P: n/a
There is partial relief in 2003, (not 2000 though) in that if you have some
code in th eOL app which passes an object to your code then you can work
back up to a pointer to the application object which then allows you to use
the other objects in the model without security warnings.
e.g. If in the NewMailEx event you called a dlll and pased a reference to
the mail object which had just been received then that dll can then reply or
forward or whatever without the security warnings.
--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access
"Rick Brandt" <ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:6W*****************@newssvr11.news.prodigy.co m...
Tom van Stiphout wrote:
On Wed, 04 May 2005 02:48:22 GMT, "Rick Brandt"
<ri*********@hotmail.com> wrote:

This is the registry file I use:

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Secu rity]
"CheckAdminSettings"=dword:00000001

It works in conjunction with Exchange. Here is an article with more
info on that:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...t/outcust.mspx
I added that key and it did nothing. If you mean that one also has to
change the security settings on the Exchange server then that is a different kettle of fish. I have always known that the security stuff can be relaxed if you can get the Exchange admins to change policy settings. The point is that the client (thus an Access app) cannot do anything about these security prompts (other than to avoid using Outlook/simple MAPI).

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com

Nov 13 '05 #10

P: n/a
If I understand you correctly, I don't think this is what we'll be
running into. It seems you're saying that there first has to be an
inbound email for the security to turn a blind eye to the
replied/forwarded outbound.

The procedure we've got using GroupWise is all outbound emails. It's
basically just two procedures AutoEMailSingle (one email addy passed)
and AutoEMailAll (a table name passed with multiple addresses).

My goal is to hopefully build/borrow code to duplicate the GW library
functionality, and then just swap one out from another.

Now, if I have enough time to do it...

Nov 13 '05 #11

P: n/a
You understand correctly, which is why I said there's only partial relief
<g>.
--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access
<ac*******@railvan.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegr oups.com...
If I understand you correctly, I don't think this is what we'll be
running into. It seems you're saying that there first has to be an
inbound email for the security to turn a blind eye to the
replied/forwarded outbound.

The procedure we've got using GroupWise is all outbound emails. It's
basically just two procedures AutoEMailSingle (one email addy passed)
and AutoEMailAll (a table name passed with multiple addresses).

My goal is to hopefully build/borrow code to duplicate the GW library
functionality, and then just swap one out from another.

Now, if I have enough time to do it...

Nov 13 '05 #12

P: n/a
On 3 May 2005 17:52:35 -0700, "ac*******@railvan.com" <ac*******@railvan.com>
wrote:
Within the next six months, our office is going to be converting it's
e-mail server from GroupWise over to Outlook 2003 & MS Exchange. I
have been using Dimitri Furman's (google him, he's out there) GroupWise
API code for years and have been quite happy with it. However, with
the conversion, I'm forced to ditch it for Outlook.

The I.T. department is still mired in red tape over the A97->A2K3
conversion, so I know I'll still be in A97. My question is: Are
they're any known/large issues with using the ancient A97 environment
to automate Outlook 2003?

I'm sure I can delve into the object library when I get my hands on it,
but I want to be certain I wanted to make sure I don't have too ugly of
a beast to contend with.

Thanks in advance,
Anthony.


If you can have Exchange server set up to allow SMTP forwarding from internal
IP addresses (or just certain internal IP addresses) or if there's an ISP SMTP
server you can reach, then you can also work around the problem by using a
free downloadable program called Blat.

Blat is simply a command-line tool for sending SMTP e-mail. The nice thing
about this solution is that it doesn't depend on what kind of e-mail server is
in use. I've used this solution in the past to send e-mails to system
administrators from scheduled maintenance processes, and it works great.

One note - it's best to pass all the arguments to the command line and not use
preconfigured settings, so the application is always in control of what SMTP
server address is used, etc.
Nov 13 '05 #13

P: n/a
Worst problem: IT department who's been using nothing but Novell
software for the entire time they've been working with this company
will be picking up Exchange and practically "winging it" for awhile.

Even the most simplistic of these settings is bound to get me a good
handful of raised eyebrows due to the security risks. (All Hail SOx!)

Thanks to all on this though!

Nov 13 '05 #14

P: n/a
On 9 May 2005 20:37:31 -0700, "ac*******@railvan.com" <ac*******@railvan.com>
wrote:
Worst problem: IT department who's been using nothing but Novell
software for the entire time they've been working with this company
will be picking up Exchange and practically "winging it" for awhile.

Even the most simplistic of these settings is bound to get me a good
handful of raised eyebrows due to the security risks. (All Hail SOx!)

Thanks to all on this though!


Allowing SMTP mail from internal IP addresses is a pretty trivial setting to
make and is commonly enabled to support users of e-mail clients besides
Outlook. You might find that IT already has it enabled.
Nov 13 '05 #15

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