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P: n/a
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that runs over
win server networks. There are now more and more users who would like to
take away a copy of app with them, work offline, and when they come back
expect the client copy to sync (both ways) with the server copy. Seems like
a reasonable requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make this
happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end to vb or
something like that? Anything else? How do other people do this?

Thanks

Regards
Nov 13 '05 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
John wrote:
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that runs over
win server networks. There are now more and more users who would like to
take away a copy of app with them, work offline, and when they come back
expect the client copy to sync (both ways) with the server copy. Seems like
a reasonable requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make this
happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end to vb or
something like that? Anything else? How do other people do this?


It's called replication. Read the Access help articles (under Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication
--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
I tried that but find it unreliable. Ideally I do not want to mess with the
backend db where the data is. That is why I am asking the sql server
question which I presume supports syncing natively and presumably reliably.

Thanks

Regards

"MGFoster" <me@privacy.com> wrote in message
news:cz******************@newsread3.news.pas.earth link.net...
John wrote:
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that runs over win server networks. There are now more and more users who would like to
take away a copy of app with them, work offline, and when they come back
expect the client copy to sync (both ways) with the server copy. Seems like a reasonable requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make this happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end to vb or something like that? Anything else? How do other people do this?


It's called replication. Read the Access help articles (under Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication
--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
"MGFoster" wrote
It's called replication. Read the
Access help articles (under Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication


And, just a reminder: Replication is not for the faint of heart. It can be
complex and "messy". There are a lot of people who post here who have done
it and made it work, so this (comp.databases.ms-access) is an excellent
resource if you decide to give it a try.

Michael Kaplan had some good information on Replication at his site
http://www.trigeminal.com. I would imagine it is still there and still
valid. As far as I know, there has been no change to the Replication
features in Access 2002 or 2003.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
SQL Server also has replication, but it is not automagic. It has to be
set up just as Access does (with GUIDs, scheduling [or not], etc.), but,
obviously, with differences.

Since SQL'r is considered a back-end I'm not sure what you mean by the
statement "I do not want to mess with the backend db." With all dbs
that support replication you'd have to do it for the back-end.
--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)

John wrote:
I tried that but find it unreliable. Ideally I do not want to mess with the
backend db where the data is. That is why I am asking the sql server
question which I presume supports syncing natively and presumably reliably.

Thanks

Regards

"MGFoster" <me@privacy.com> wrote in message
news:cz******************@newsread3.news.pas.earth link.net...
John wrote:
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that runs
over
win server networks. There are now more and more users who would like to
take away a copy of app with them, work offline, and when they come back
expect the client copy to sync (both ways) with the server copy. Seems
like
a reasonable requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make
this
happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end to vb
or
something like that? Anything else? How do other people do this?


It's called replication. Read the Access help articles (under Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication
--
MGFoster:::mgf00 <at> earthlink <decimal-point> net
Oakland, CA (USA)


Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
if 'work offline' means out of the office, maybe a web application to
your backend data would solve the problem...

MGFoster <me@privacy.com> wrote in message news:<cz******************@newsread3.news.pas.eart hlink.net>...
John wrote:
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that runs over
win server networks. There are now more and more users who would like to
take away a copy of app with them, work offline, and when they come back
expect the client copy to sync (both ways) with the server copy. Seems like
a reasonable requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make this
happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end to vb or
something like that? Anything else? How do other people do this?


It's called replication. Read the Access help articles (under Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication

Nov 13 '05 #6

P: n/a
MGFoster <me@privacy.com> wrote in
news:cz******************@newsread3.news.pas.earth link.net:
John wrote:
Hi

We have an access app (both front & back ends are in access) that
runs over win server networks. There are now more and more users
who would like to take away a copy of app with them, work
offline, and when they come back expect the client copy to sync
(both ways) with the server copy. Seems like a reasonable
requirement. The question is; what do I need to do to make this
happen? Do I need to switch the backend to sql server? Front end
to vb or something like that? Anything else? How do other people
do this?


It's called replication. Read the Access help articles (under
Contents):

Database Replication
Understanding Replication
... these articles & others under DB Replication


I'd strongly recommend against replication.

I know whereof I speak, as I've been doing replication since 1997,
and while I think it's a gloriously amazing technology for such an
inexpensive little product as Access, it's just way to hard to set
up and keep running without losing everything.

The solution: Windows Terminal Server. That way remote users and
home users can connect and run the app local to your LAN. It means
all administrative responsibilities are centralized and easily
handled in one place. It also means you don't have to have anything
installed on remote PCs except the Remote Desktop Client and
standard Internet access (though you should probably do the
connection across a VPN).

The only circumstance in which replication is still justified is
with people who travel and can't affordably connect to the Internet
to run the app at the mother ship on WTS. In that case, I set them
up so that they have to take some action to refresh a replica of the
data file on the laptop before leaving the office, then switch their
front end to use that replica, then have them synch with the main
data file upon return from travel.

All is done with DIRECT REPLICATION because it's all across the
office LAN. You don't even want to contemplate anything about
INDIRECT or INTERNET replication (i.e., synchronizing when the
laptop is out of the office), unless you already have lots of
experience with replication under your belt. I would not contemplate
or recommend either these days, as I just don't think the value is
there for the amount of work it takes to set up and keep it running.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in
news:6PY9e.80650$B12.52414@trnddc09:
Michael Kaplan had some good information on Replication at his
site http://www.trigeminal.com. I would imagine it is still there
and still valid. . ..
Another excellent resource is the newsgroup
microsoft.public.access.replication, which at one point was kind of
like the Tonight show with Johnny Carson, with Michael Kaplan being
our nightly host (i.e., when Michael was still hard at work on
replication projects, before he went into the internationalization
field, 1/2 or 2/3s of the answers in the group were by him).

If Michael Kaplan said it about replication, you can take it to the
bank -- he knows this stuff cold. He knows what is supported, what
the design goals were and how things have been implemented (and he
was also part of the development team, having designed the conflict
resolution wizard for A2K).
. . . As far as I know, there has been no change to the
Replication features in Access 2002 or 2003.


Not so far as I know. But keep in mind that I don't know what the
new file format versions do to the equation. I do know that Access
2000 could read but not edit a replicated Access 97 data file. Given
that A2K is now the default format for all the newer versions of
Access, my guess is that all of them have full read/write access to
replicated A2K files. But my expectation is that if you replicate an
A2K3 MDB, it would be readable/writable only by A2K3, and perhaps
likewise with A2K2-format used by A2K3.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Nov 13 '05 #8

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